This Week at the Movies, Part 1 (Sep. 5-7, 2014)

Our critics have been hard at work reviewing the latest films. Here is a look at what’s coming out this weekend (in select cities, check your local listings) and what else may be in theaters right now.

Opening: September 5-7, 2014

Wide (United States)

The Identical

Cole Smithey @ ColeSmithey.com

  • Excerpt: A shoo-in for a spot on any worst movies of 2014 list, this poorly constructed slice of propaganda, courtesy of the Messianic Jewish Alliance of America (MJAA), is so unintentionally campy you can’t help but laugh.

Frank Swietek @ One Guys Opinion

  • Excerpt: The basic premise is actually fairly interesting. Unfortunately, it’s been poorly worked out and clumsily executed.

Limited (United States)

But Always

James Marsh @ Twitch

  • Excerpt: Nicholas Tse proves he is better-suited to tough guy roles than romantic leads, but his inert performance here opposite Gao Yuanyuan is far from the only problem with Snow Zou’s shockingly cliched and unaware tragi-romance.

God Help the Girl

Nicholas Bell @ IONCINEMA.com

  • Excerpt: dull exercise of endless emotional exposition which desperately wants to infuse the musical sensibilities of Jacques Demy into the drab kitchen sink melodrama of teen angst in Glasgow.

Innocence

Nicholas Bell @ IONCINEMA.com

  • Excerpt: in a modern world where ancient covens still exist, one would wish that the supernatural world would be a bit more progressive—this virgin motif seems incredibly dated, even though Brougher is trying to make this an allegory about modern female adolescence, –

Frank Swietek @ One Guys Opinion

  • Excerpt: An extremely silly attempt at a young adult thriller that winds up laughable rather than scary.

Rocks in My Pockets

Frederic and Mary Ann Brussat @ SpiritualityandPractice.com

  • Excerpt: A wild and weird animated feature about a Latvian grandmother who passes on her depression to others in the family circle.

Wetlands

Cole Smithey @ ColeSmithey.com

  • Excerpt: Challenging and provocative, co-writer/director David Wnendt’s nervy adaptation of Charlotte Roche’s presumably unfilmable popular novel, breaks new cinematic ground.

2014 Films In Theaters Now In Select Areas

As Above / So Below

For member reviews of this film, follow this link

La Bare

Marina Antunes @ Row Three

Bicycling with Molière

Jamie S. Rich @ DVD Talk

  • Excerpt: A smart and insightful human drama, it builds its narrative on two aging actors bickering over a possible production of Moliere’s The Misanthrope. Fabrice Luchini and Lambert Wilson are superb in the main roles, creating complex characters who are always interesting to watch because they have plenty of interesting things to say.

Boyhood

For member reviews of this film, follow this link

The Calling

Marina Antunes @ Row Three

Canopy

Glenn Dunks @ Glenn Dunks

  • Excerpt: Canopy is a movie rich of its own world, an 80-minute work of filmmaking that rises above mere war or survival films and becomes something unique.

Code Black

For member reviews of this film, follow this link

The Congress

Frederic and Mary Ann Brussat @ SpiritualityandPractice.com

  • Excerpt: Intriguing story about what it would be like to live in a post-avatar world.

The Double

For member reviews of this film, follow this link

Gimme Shelter

For member reviews of this film, follow this link

The Grand Seduction

For member reviews of this film, follow this link

Guardians of the Galaxy

For member reviews of this film, follow this link

The Guest

Stefan Pape @ HeyUGuys

  • Excerpt: Adam Wingard pays homage to the horror genre, by adhering to the distinct conventionalities with a tongue firmly in his cheek.

The Hundred-Foot Journey

For member reviews of this film, follow this link

Ida

For member reviews of this film, follow this link

The Internet’s Own Boy: The Story of Aaron Swartz

For member reviews of this film, follow this link

Into the Storm

For member reviews of this film, follow this link

Jamie Marks Is Dead

Jeremy Kibler @ The Artful Critic

  • Excerpt: A somber, harshly grim supernatural twist on the coming-of-age tale, “Jamie Marks Is Dead” is never as fully realized as desired, but there is something about it that stirs in the mind.

Life After Beth

For member reviews of this film, follow this link

Life of Crime

For member reviews of this film, follow this link

Locke

For member reviews of this film, follow this link

Lucy

For member reviews of this film, follow this link

Magic in the Moonlight

For member reviews of this film, follow this link

Manakamana

Oktay Ege Kozak @ DVD Talk

A Master Builder

Laura Clifford @ Reeling Reviews

  • Excerpt: It’s a remarkable adaptation, Henrik Ibsen by way of Bob Fosse, a little “All That Jazz” influence in this permutation featuring modern dress and period manners and language, fitted out by a note perfect ensemble.

Memphis

Chris Barsanti @ Film Journal International

  • Excerpt: Tim Sutton’s gorgeously shot nomadic mood piece about a temperamental musician searching Memphis for God, inspiration, or both will bore most audiences but hypnotize a few looking for that magical symbiosis of Jim Jarmusch’s blank poetry and David Gordon Green’s early Southern Gothic.

The November Man

For member reviews of this film, follow this link

Pride

Darren Mooney @ the m0vie blog

  • Excerpt: A great deal of…

Sex Tape

For member reviews of this film, follow this link

Sin City: A Dame to Kill For

For member reviews of this film, follow this link

Starred Up

For member reviews of this film, follow this link

They Came Together

For member reviews of this film, follow this link

To Be Takei

Jerry Roberts @ Armchair Cinema

  • Excerpt: For those who only know Takei as Sulu, the documentary To Be Takei comes as sort of a cold water treatment. It is a history lesson, the fascinating story of a man who fought a personal battle on three fronts, as an Asian, as an actor, and as an activist for gay rights.

The Trip to Italy

For member reviews of this film, follow this link

Willow Creek

For member reviews of this film, follow this link

2013 Films In Theaters Now In Select Areas

I Am Divine

Gregory J. Smalley @ 366 Weird Movies

  • Excerpt: The reverential interviews and clips meet, but don’t exceed, your expectations for a documentary about Divine

2014 Films (Coming Soon)

Attila Marcel

Stefan Pape @ HeyUGuys

  • Excerpt: Rich in whimsicality – at times, a little overbearingly so – there is still a charm to this piece, and it’s grounded effectively by its moving narrative.

Casualties of the State

Bev Questad @ It’s Just Movies

  • Excerpt: If someone were in a position of potential, let’s say in the FBI, and had incontrovertible evidence of a blasphemous misuse of public funds, constitutional policy and military resources by select Cheney-like politicos, what would be the right thing to do?

L’enlèvement de Michel Houellebecq

Diego Salgado @ Guía del Ocio [Spanish]

Hal

Oktay Ege Kozak @ DVD Talk

Half-Brother

Bev Questad @ It’s Just Movies

  • Excerpt: Three bad things coincide and our protagonist has to find a way to move on. Though everyone has crises, it’s how they are survived that makes lives meaningful.

I Believe in Unicorns

Bev Questad @ It’s Just Movies

  • Excerpt: Many girls, blinded by love, lust and excitement, will let themselves be buried. In martyrdom women throughout time have accepted the pecking order, stayed with their man to “help” him, and swallowed their humiliation. But Davinia sees herself as smart – and what does “smart” do?

Raja Natwarlal

Kathy Gibson @ Access Bollywood

Second Opinion: Laetrile at Sloan-Kettering

Frederic and Mary Ann Brussat @ SpiritualityandPractice.com

  • Excerpt: Portrait of a thoughtful, articulate, and courageous whistle-blower.

Bev Questad @ It’s Just Movies

  • Excerpt: “Second Opinion,” a documentary about cancer research and laetrile at Sloan-Kettering, shows what happened when one person, Ralph Moss, lifted up the pharmaceutical rock and was honest about what he saw.

Song of the New Earth

Bev Questad @ It’s Just Movies

  • Excerpt: The foundation of Kenyon’s work is that “music and sound are both the language and architecture of the cosmos” and his message is about healing and survival.

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