Online Film Critics Society

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Reviews: Locke (2014)

lockeReviews for this film from our members:

  • Marco Albanese @ Stanze di Cinema [Italian]
    • Excerpt: On the road assoluto, notturno, silenzioso, senza approdo, se non quello dell’emozione.
  • [New – 4/30/15] | Rick Aragon @ Rick’s Cafe Texan
    • Excerpt: For me, the issue with Locke isn’t Tom Hardy. It’s the scenario.
  • Chris Barsanti @ PopMatters
    • Excerpt: Tom Hardy’s visceral performance in this one-man meltdown packs more drama than a half-dozen multi-character stories.
  • Frederic and Mary Ann Brussat @ SpiritualityandPractice.com
    • Excerpt: An intense, well-acted drama of one middle-aged man’s dark night of the soul where his choices come back to haunt him.
  • Kevin Carr @ 7M Pictures
    • Excerpt: What we get is an intimate portrayal of a man’s life as it implodes. And that is heartbreaking to watch.
  • Laura Clifford @ Reeling Reviews
    • Excerpt: Locke, with one man in a car for 85 minutes, is incredibly accomplished filmmaking.
  • Carlos del Río @ El rincón de Carlos del Río [Spanish]
    • Excerpt: Ya me estoy cansando de este tipo de películas caprichosas.
  • Jim Dixon @ Examiner.com
    • Excerpt: It would be tempting to call “Locke” a radio drama with nice photography, but Hardy is acting even when he isn’t talking. His face, his body language, his sweat and an occasional tear often do the talking for him. Perhaps best-known for the ferocious physicality of his roles in “Warrior” and “The Dark Knight Rises,” the chameleon-like actor is riveting here. The best movie acting often takes place behind the eyes, and this is particularly the case when a character is wrapped tight.
  • Mark Dujsik @ Mark Reviews Movies
    • Excerpt: The drama of the film is in Hardy’s face…
  • Candice Frederick @ Reel Talk
  • Roderick Heath @ This Island Rod
    • Excerpt: Writer-director Steven Knight here has tackled a daunting and ambitious dramatic mode that comes damn close to classical Greek tragedy.
  • MaryAnn Johanson @ FlickFilosopher.com
    • Excerpt: We say things like, “Oh, I’d watch that guy read the phone book,” and this is almost that. Except it really is absolutely riveting, and that’s no joke.
  • Jeremy Kibler @ The Artful Critic
    • Excerpt: The actor is a tour de force, to be sure, but while “Locke” has snatched up loads of critical acclaim, the rest of the film never feels as engrossing as Hardy’s performance.
  • Oktay Ege Kozak @ Oregon Herald
    • Excerpt: Locke is another example of the single actor, single location approach in features, which seem to be gaining steam recently. Like Buried, 127 Hours, Wrecked and even Phone Booth, the entire runtime takes place in one small location while the story revolves around a single character.
  • Donald Levit @ ReelTalk Movie Reviews
  • Carson Lund @ Are the Hills Going to March Off?
    • Excerpt: At its best, the film is quite despairing; it subtly ponders whether firm, diplomatic actions in the present can ever fully correct errors in the past.
  • Simon Miraudo @ Quickflix
  • Pat Mullen @ Cinemablographer
    • Excerpt: Features a concept that works much better with Robert Redford on a boat.
  • Jonathan Richards @ www.jonrichardsplace.com
    • Excerpt: How can a movie that keeps us locked in a car for its duration, alone with a single character and a supporting cast of disembodied voices, work so brilliantly? Shot in eight nights, on a budget under $2 million, Steven Knight’s film is a testimony to imagination and talent.
  • Sarah Ward @ Concrete Playground
Updated: July 7, 2015 — 7:33 pm

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