Classics & More on DVD (Nov. 24, 2020)

Here are our latest reviews of films on DVD.

Pre-2018 Film Reviews

The Anderson Tapes

Luiz Santiago @ Plano Crítico (1971) [Portuguese]

Attack of the 50 Foot Woman

Mark Leeper @ Mark Leeper’s Reviews (1958)

  • Excerpt: One of those films that has become a low-grade camp classic, though not as incompetent as some of the films of this period.

Family Business

Luiz Santiago @ Plano Crítico (1989) [Portuguese]

The Offence

Luiz Santiago @ Plano Crítico (1973) [Portuguese]

Saturday Night and Sunday Morning

Rick Aragon @ Rick’s Texan Reviews (1960)

Shalako

Luiz Santiago @ Plano Crítico (1968) [Portuguese]

Xala

Luiz Santiago @ Plano Crítico (1975) [Portuguese]

From Our Members’ Desks (Nov. 23, 2020)

OFCS members don’t just write film reviews. Here are several articles you might find interesting.

Best of Lists

5 Favorites Redux #55: Favorite Nicolas Cage Films

Wesley Lovell @ Cinema Sight

Awards Coverage

2020 Oscar Nominations Predictions: November

Wesley Lovell @ Cinema Sight

Enough With The Oscar Diversity Requirements. The Academy Needs To Change Its Mindset.

Candice Frederick @ Harper’s Bazaar

The Friday Face-Off, Losers Bracket Round One #14

Wesley Lovell @ Cinema Sight

Oscar Preview: Weekend of Nov. 13-15, 2020

Wesley Lovell @ Cinema Sight

Poll: Remaking Best Original Screenplay, 2000

Wesley Lovell @ Cinema Sight

Other Types of Articles

Continue reading From Our Members’ Desks (Nov. 23, 2020)

This Week at the Movies (Nov. 20, 2020)

Here are some reviews of films coming out at the theater this week as well as others that may be in theaters or newly on home video.

Opening: Nov. 20, 2020

Limited (United States)

Collective

Laura Clifford @ Reeling Reviews

  • Excerpt: This artfully unfolding documentary is part political thriller, part paean to investigative free press, the whole haunted by Tedy Ursuleanu…who has turned her severe burning and disfigurement into something like national conscience performance art

Embattled

Jared Mobarak @ The Film Stage

  • Excerpt: [The climactic fight is] where the fireworks are, but the true worth to Embattled is the path Jett takes to get there and the reasons for why he does.

Jiu Jitsu

Brent McKnight @ The Last Thing I See

  • Excerpt: A movie starring Nicolas Cage, Alain Moussi, Tony Jaa, Frank Grillo, JuJu Chan, Marie Avgeropoulos, and Rick Yune, about a group of elite fighters who must use martial arts to defeat an alien invader, directed by one of the masterminds behind the recent Kickboxer films. That’s probably enough information for viewers to decide whether or not to see Jiu Jitsu, a film that delivers precisely what one might expect.

Laura Clifford @ Reeling Reviews

  • Excerpt: Ahmed doesn’t engage in histrionics, instead giving a quiet, internal performance…The man we are left with (in a knockout of a final scene) is very changed from the one we first met.

Karl Delossantos @ Smash Cut Reviews

  • Excerpt: Sound of Metal is one of the best portrayals of deafness in film using smart sound design and a stellar performance by Riz Ahmed to communicate the experience. And while it loses steam as it makes its way to the finale the core message is powerful and poignant.

Sound of Metal

Josh Taylor @ The Forgetful Film Critic

  • Excerpt: It’s a simple setup – almost high-concept: the elevator pitch might be, “Metal drummer loses his hearing overnight and must face radically changing his life in order to adjust.” But the careful attention to detail and emotional complexity that first-time director Darius Marder and his co-screenwriter Abraham Marder put into the picture make Sound of Metal a deeply moving experience.

The Twentieth Century

Laura Clifford @ Reeling Reviews

  • Excerpt: …what happens in Winnipeg doesn’t stay in Winnipeg, here depicted…as a red light district of fetishism where King indulges his used boot fetish by buying one of Ruby’s to huff back at home as his oversized cactus ejaculates.

Charlie Juhl @ Citizen Charlie

  • Excerpt: A fever dream of German Expressionism propelling forth Canadian political chicanery. For the adventurous cinephile, this may be the most fun you have all year.

Jared Mobarak @ JaredMobarak.com

  • Excerpt: Rankin is upping the “Canadian-ness” of the piece with each aspect of his production, placing what’s already a very niche topic into very singular packaging.

Zappa

Jared Mobarak @ The Film Stage

  • Excerpt: An in-depth look at the man behind the mustache through his own words, those of his collaborators, and the art itself.

2020 Films In Theaters Now In Select Areas

Continue reading This Week at the Movies (Nov. 20, 2020)

Classics & More on DVD (Nov. 17, 2020)

Here are our latest reviews of films on DVD.

Pre-2018 Film Reviews

Kingsman: The Secret Service

Wesley Lovell @ Cinema Sight (2014)

Raintree County

Rick Aragon @ Rick’s Texan Reviews (1957)

Shalako

Luiz Santiago @ Plano Crítico (1968) [Portuguese]

From Our Members’ Desks (Nov. 16, 2020)

OFCS members don’t just write film reviews. Here are several articles you might find interesting.

Best of Lists

5 Favorites Redux #54: Favorite Diane Keaton Films

Wesley Lovell @ Cinema Sight

The Best Films of 2020 (So Far)

Candice Frederick @ Harper’s Bazaar

Interviews

The Dark and the Wicked Star Marin Ireland Has Her Own Survival Plan

Candice Frederick @ W Magazine

Kindred Star Tamara Lawrance Will Not Be Put Into a Box

Candice Frederick @ W Magazine

Festivals: General Coverage

Saint Louis International Film Festival 2020 Preview

Sarah Boslaugh @ TheArtsSTL

  • Excerpt: The 29thedition of SLIFF will be a little different, however: due to the COVID-19 pandemic, everything will be run online. Which is not entirely a bad thing–it’s true that you miss the fun of seeing a film on the big screen in a communal setting, to say nothing of choosing your snacks from the concession stand, but on the plus side you don’t have to deal with weather, parking, getting a babysitter, and in most cases scheduling.

Festivals: Individual Reviews

Continue reading From Our Members’ Desks (Nov. 16, 2020)

This Week at the Movies (Nov. 13, 2020)

Here are some reviews of films coming out at the theater this week as well as others that may be in theaters or newly on home video.

Opening: Nov. 13, 2020

Wide (United States)

Freaky

For member reviews of this film, follow this link

Limited (United States)

Ammonite

Laura Clifford @ Reeling Reviews

  • Excerpt: Winslet is extraordinary here, every year of unappreciated hard work writ across her expression, her mannish way of walking the gait of a laborer…Lee’s fashioned a wonderful what-if examination of a little known historical figure

The Climb

Laura Clifford @ Reeling Reviews

  • Excerpt: “The Climb” is not only funny and insightful, but full of cinematic invention, its scenes transitioning on everything from singing gravediggers to pole dancing karaoke to a tracking shot of a dog that takes us from Thanksgiving to Christmas.

Come Away

Charlie Juhl @ Citizen Charlie

  • Excerpt: I know most children’s stories are based on sinister myths which dribbled out of spooky German Brothers Grimm forests, but it’s perplexing to see both Neverland and Wonderland stand upon the shoulders of one family’s emotional meltdown.

Dreamland

Jared Mobarak @ The Film Stage

  • Excerpt: Dreamland isn’t Ain’t Them Bodies Saints, but it is an attractive deviation that skews younger with its coming-of-age nostalgia rising above the plot’s dramatic intrigue.

Fatman

Laura Clifford @ Reeling Reviews

  • Excerpt: There is a subgenre of Christmas movies that intersect with blackly comic horror…Nelms’ film is so off kilter, it doesn’t quite line up with those in either the horror or comedy departments, but should appeal to the same audience.

Wolfwalkers

Laura Clifford @ Reeling Reviews

  • Excerpt: Moore’s work is immediately identifiable…and this one is a beauty, its 17th century architecture comprised of geometric shapes, its forest magically rendered in swirling autumnal shades, its undulating wolf pack moving as one.

2020 Films In Theaters Now In Select Areas

Continue reading This Week at the Movies (Nov. 13, 2020)

Reviews: Freaky (2020)

Here are review links for this film submitted by our members:

  • Laura Clifford @ Reeling Reviews
    • Excerpt: Christopher Landon of the “Happy Death Day” series returns with a new gimmick up his sleeve and it’s a corker of a concept, one which gives us something we didn’t know we needed – Vince Vaughn getting his inner 17 year-old girl on.
  • [New] | Mike McGranaghan @ The Aisle Seat
    • Excerpt: Freaky is a total scream, in more than one sense of the word.
  • Brent McKnight @ The Last Thing I See
    • Excerpt: Not always 100% successful—the plot is easily predictable and contains zero surprises—it’s an effective, screwdriver-stabbing, corpse-sawing good time.
  • Jared Mobarak @ The Film Stage
    • Excerpt: Freaky’s success lies in its ability to create around [Vaughn’s] central performance and not simply rely upon its absurdity.

Reviews: Rebecca (2020)

Here are review links for this film submitted by our members:

Reviews: The Nest (2020)

Here are review links for this film submitted by our members:

  • Laura Clifford @ Reeling Reviews
    • Excerpt: Nine longs years after his 2011 debut “Martha Marcy May Marlene” writer/director Sean Durkin returns with another unsettling film whose surface belies what lies beneath.
  • [New] | James Jay Edwards @ The Big Smoke America
  • Jared Mobarak @ JaredMobarak.com
    • Excerpt: Durkin exposes the danger of the allure of 80s materialism that was propped up as the American Dream by spotlighting the destructive potential of its cracks.
  • Matt Oakes @
    • Excerpt: This well-acted follow-up feature from Sean Durkin is a ruminant deconstruction of ambition at the cost of a family’s emotional well-being. ‘The Nest’s measured pace and subtle themes may leave some viewers wondering at its meaning but those willing to emotionally engage with Durkin’s work may find themselves helplessly dwelling on exactly that.
  • Dennis Schwartz @ Dennis Schwartz Reviews
    • Excerpt: A curious and disturbing family drama.

Reviews: Lucky Grandma (2020)

Here are review links for this film submitted by our members:

  • Herman Dhaliwal @ Cinema Sanctum
    • Excerpt: A relatively standard formula is used to add details in character and environment that ring true of underrepresented experiences, and it does so with a sly sense of humor. It’s a promising directorial debut from Sasie Sealy that gives Tsai Chin an opportunity to really shine.
  • MaryAnn Johanson @ FlickFilosopher.com
    • Excerpt: Wild sass, gentle comedy, shivs of poignancy, and instantly vivid characters add up to a wonderful riff on mob movies as a Chinatown granny faces off against gangsters. Tsai Chin is an absolute hoot.
  • Charlie Juhl @ Citizen Charlie
    • Excerpt: Presenting itself as oddball and left field, Lucky Grandma is not as wry as it thinks it is. Boilerplate plot and the laborious way it unfolds offsets the authentic Chinatown setting leaving the audience with only indifference by the end.
  • Eddie Pasa @ DC Filmdom
  • [New] | Andrew Wyatt @ The Lens

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