All posts by Governing Committee

Reviews: Borat Subsequent Moviefilm (2020)

Here are review links for this film submitted by our members:

  • [New] | Andrea Chase @ KillerMovieReviews.com
    • Excerpt: A Rabelaisian excursion into the absurd.
  • Laura Clifford @ Reeling Reviews
    • Excerpt: …while Mikael Pence is never reached, plenty of CPAC attendees barely glance at Cohen beneath his full KKK regalia and Rudy Giuliani, who thought he’d escaped being made a mockery of, is now being investigated for his (really disgusting) behavior…
  • [New] | Herman Dhaliwal @ Cinema Sanctum
    • Excerpt: Not as impactful as the first, but still incredibly funny. Maria Bakalova steals the show, delivering a brilliant and committed performance that led to some of the funniest moments.
  • [New] | Mark Hobin @ Fast Film Reviews
    • Excerpt: A lot has changed since the first movie. More of the same isn’t enough.
  • MaryAnn Johanson @ FlickFilosopher.com
    • Excerpt: A work of breathtaking audacity. This is as perilous as comedy gets, and it’s very, very funny, often shockingly so. Sacha Baron Cohen’s scathing cultural strikes land like extinction-level asteroids.
  • [New] | Simon Miraudo @ Student Edge
    • Excerpt: Bad news: there’s a pandemic on. Good news: Borat’s back. It’s the trade no one would make, but it’s the one we’re living with.
  • [New] | Matt Oakes @
    • Excerpt: Sacha Baron Cohen brings Borat back from the grave to confront 2020 America in ‘Borat Subsequent Moviefilm’. The result is decidedly less iconic (and relies too heavily on scripted rather than unscripted material) but succeeds in delivering gut-busting laughs and Cohen’s brand of shock and awe comedy, while also moving the dial on what Cohen’s particular style of shockumentary is able to offer. Newcomer Maria Bakalova is a treasure.

Reviews: Love and Monsters (2020)

Here are review links for this film submitted by our members:

  • Herman Dhaliwal @ Cinema Sanctum
    • Excerpt: There’s a lot of fun to be had with this, from its humor to its engaging action sequences to the very charming and vulnerable lead performance from Dylan O’Brien.
  • MaryAnn Johanson @ FlickFilosopher.com
    • Excerpt: This pleasantly silly-sad apocalypse, melancholy with a dash of optimism, smashes clichés and finds fresh angles on the familiar. Dylan O’Brien has a self-deprecating charm; there’s a great dog, too.
  • Mike McGranaghan @ The Aisle Seat
    • Excerpt: Love and Monsters is the perfect movie if you can’t decide whether you want a romantic-comedy or a horror flick.
  • Jared Mobarak @ The Film Stage
    • Excerpt: Love and Monsters proves itself a pretty well rounded adventure for both its target audience and those older looking for a bit of escape that’s still firmly rooted in reality.
  • [New] | Dennis Schwartz @ Dennis Schwartz Reviews
    • Excerpt: It’s silly but with some depth thrown in.

Reviews: Synchronic (2020)

Here are review links for this film submitted by our members:

  • [New] | Herman Dhaliwal @ Cinema Sanctum
    • Excerpt: I wouldn’t consider it to be one of the better efforts of Justin Benson and Aaron Moorhead, but it still showcases a lot of the skill and creativity that made them such exciting filmmakers in the first place.
  • Brent McKnight @ The Last Thing I See
    • Excerpt: Ambitious and weird and unlike anything you’re likely to encounter anytime soon.
  • Jared Mobarak @ The Film Stage
    • Excerpt: Where I could forget the genre element in [previous films] to latch onto the people therein, the opposite proves true here. While still objectively enough, I [did want] more.
  • [New] | Matt Oakes @
    • Excerpt: Sci-fi indie filmmakers Justin Benson and Aaron Moorhead have done it again with the trippy, drug-fueled time travel experiment ‘Synchronic’, which benefits from a strong leading man and an arresting balance of body horror and temporal experimentation.
  • Eddi Pasa @ DC Filmdom
    • Excerpt: Synchronic is one of the best films of the year, another corker of a sci-fi thriller from writing/directing duo Aaron Moorhead and Justin Benson.
  • [New] | Dennis Schwartz @ Dennis Schwartz Reviews
    • Excerpt: Superficial.
  • Gregory J. Smalley @ 366 Weird Movies
    • Excerpt: The characters are likable, their situations dramatic and relatable, and they’re all set up for a speculative blast that will blow the hinges off. The problem is that when the sci-fi twist arrives, it’s basic and contrived, and not weird enough to compensate for its unbelievability.

Classics & More on DVD (Oct. 27, 2020)

Here are our latest reviews of films on DVD.

Pre-2018 Film Reviews

The Boys in the Band

Luiz Santiago @ Plano Crítico (1970) [Portuguese]

The Little Girl Who Sold the Sun

Luiz Santiago @ Plano Crítico (1999) [Portuguese]

Making the Boys

Luiz Santiago @ Plano Crítico (2011) [Portuguese]

Memories of Murder

Mike McGranaghan @ The Aisle Seat (2003)

  • Excerpt: Like Parasite, it’s one of those stories that sucks you right in, then proceeds to surprise you on a regular basis.

Open Grave

Wesley Lovell @ Cinema Sight (2013)

From Our Members’ Desks (Oct. 26, 2020)

OFCS members don’t just write film reviews. Here are several articles you might find interesting.

Best of Lists

5 Favorites Redux #50: Favorite Horror Films, Part 2

Wesley Lovell @ Cinema Sight

Interviews

Aaron Sorkin on “The Trial of the Chicago 7”

Nell Minow @ Medium

  • Excerpt: “In my head, the film organized itself into three stories that would be told at once: the courtroom drama, the evolution of what was supposed to be a peaceful protest into a riot, a violent clash with the police and the National Guard, and the third story, one that wasn’t in any of the books or the trial transcript, and that I would only be able to get from Tom, was the relationship between Tom and Abbie , two guys on the same side who can’t stand each other, who each think the other is doing harm to the movement, but in the end they come to respect each other..”

Radha Blank’s Lockdown Breakout Film Doubles as Her Own Origin Tale

Candice Frederick @ Harper’s Bazaar

The Studio Wanted Cameron Diaz’: Salma Hayek On The Role That Changed Her Life

Candice Frederick @ Elle

Festivals: Individual Reviews

[Nightstream] Short Films: Coil / The Nurturing

C.H. Newell @ Father Son Holy Gore

  • Excerpt: Two short films from Nightstream: one about the dread of anxiety, the other about returning to childhood figuratively and literally.

[Nightstream] Short Films: Gutterwitch / Weirdo / Landgraves

C.H. Newell @ Father Son Holy Gore

  • Excerpt: Three films from Nightstream: one about modern witchcraft, one about bullying, and another about the potential danger of macabre art.

[Nightstream] Short Films: Thorns / Jeff Drives You / At the Edge of Night / Susie

C.H. Newell @ Father Son Holy Gore

  • Excerpt: Three films from Nightstream, each about important LGBTQ2IA issues.

Dinner in America

C.H. Newell @ Father Son Holy Gore

  • Excerpt: Dinner in America takes a look at imperfect people rejected by a capitalist U.S. society that values only those who fit a perfect mould.

Jazzberry

C.H. Newell @ Father Son Holy Gore

  • Excerpt: There are very few films like Jazzberry. It has all the absurd satirical spirit of something like Brazil crossed with the artistry and surreal strangeness of Matthew Barney’s Cremaster Cycle.

NewFest 2020 Report 1

Sarah Boslaugh @ TheArtsSTL

Awards Coverage

Continue reading From Our Members’ Desks (Oct. 26, 2020)

This Week at the Movies (Oct. 23, 2020)

Here are some reviews of films coming out at the theater this week as well as others that may be in theaters or newly on home video.

Opening: Oct. 23, 2020

Wide (United States)

None

Limited (United States)

Synchronic

Brent McKnight @ The Last Thing I See

  • Excerpt: Ambitious and weird and unlike anything you’re likely to encounter anytime soon.

Eddi Pasa @ DC Filmdom

  • Excerpt: Synchronic is one of the best films of the year, another corker of a sci-fi thriller from writing/directing duo Aaron Moorhead and Justin Benson.

Gregory J. Smalley @ 366 Weird Movies

  • Excerpt: The characters are likable, their situations dramatic and relatable, and they’re all set up for a speculative blast that will blow the hinges off. The problem is that when the sci-fi twist arrives, it’s basic and contrived, and not weird enough to compensate for its unbelievability.

2020 Films In Theaters Now In Select Areas

Continue reading This Week at the Movies (Oct. 23, 2020)

Reviews: The Trial of the Chicago 7 (2020)

Here are review links for this film submitted by our members:

  • Laura Clifford @ Reeling Reviews
    • Excerpt: This momentous cultural event from the end of the turbulent 60’s is apt to floor those unfamiliar with the case given the uncanny similarities with events today… The film features a dynamic, sprawling ensemble, one of the best of the year.
  • [New] | Herman Dhaliwal @ Cinema Sanctum
    • Excerpt: For better and for worse, all of Aaron Sorkin’s idiosyncrasies on full display. It is elegant, energetic, and entertaining, but I also found the film and its messaging to be hollow.
  • [New] | Mark Hobin @ Fast Film Reviews
    • Excerpt: No argument that Aaron Sorkin is great at writing courtroom dramas, but the jury is still out on his skills as a director.
  • [New] | Mike McGranaghan @ The Aisle Seat
    • Excerpt: Even if a couple of the characters get short shrift, the film’s examination of the impact of protest is both fascinating and eerily timely.
  • Jared Mobarak @ JaredMobarak.com
    • Excerpt: It’s a project tailor-made for Aaron Sorkin [that] was surely catnip to write. No wonder its 129-minute runtime flies by like nothing.
  • [New] | Matt Oakes @
    • Excerpt: ‘The Trial of the Chicago 7’ showcases both Aaron Sorkin’s great skill and his great shortcomings. Telling the true story of a rambunctious American kangaroo court trial, Sorkin’s script is as precise and laser-honed as one would expect but his developing skill as a director still keeps audiences arm’s reach from the emotional core of the material.
  • [New] | Josh Taylor @ www.forgetfulfilmcritic.com
    • Excerpt: Aaron Sorkin’s sophomore effort in the director’s chair – after 2017’s Molly’s Game – is just as compelling, erudite, and masterful as his first. The Trial of the Chicago 7 is one of the best movies of the year so far.

Classics & More on DVD (Oct. 20, 2020)

Here are our latest reviews of films on DVD.

Pre-2018 Film Reviews

Room

Wesley Lovell @ Cinema Sight (2015)

From Our Members’ Desks (Oct. 19, 2020)

OFCS members don’t just write film reviews. Here are several articles you might find interesting.

Best of Lists

5 Favorites Redux #50: Favorite Horror Films, Part 1

Wesley Lovell @ Cinema Sight

Festivals: Individual Reviews

Anything for Jackson

C.H. Newell @ Father Son Holy Gore

  • Excerpt: Anything for Jackson uses its main characters to explore the Gothic side of ageing, and flips the idea of family on its head with Satan.

Bloody Hell

C.H. Newell @ Father Son Holy Gore

  • Excerpt: Grierson’s film is a must-see that’ll crack some up, gross some out, and make many others think.

Honeydew

Jeremy Kibler @ The Artful Critic

  • Excerpt: As sharply edited and unsettling as “Honeydew” is, the final result is about as pleasant as eating lemons dipped in milk.

An Unquiet Grave

C.H. Newell @ Father Son Holy Gore

  • Excerpt: An Unquiet Grave is a deeply emotional view of grief, and wonderfully macabre.

Awards Coverage

The Friday Face-Off, Losers Bracket Round One #9

Wesley Lovell @ Cinema Sight

Poll: Remaking Best Costume Design, 2015

Wesley Lovell @ Cinema Sight

Video Essays, Video Reviews, Vlogs & More

The Wolf of Snow Hollow

Scott Phillips @ www.wrbl.com

Reviews of Short Films

Continue reading From Our Members’ Desks (Oct. 19, 2020)

This Week at the Movies (Oct. 16, 2020)

Here are some reviews of films coming out at the theater this week as well as others that may be in theaters or newly on home video.

Opening: Oct. 16, 2020

Wide (United States)

Honest Thief

For member reviews of this film, follow this link

Limited (United States)

Martin Eden

Laura Clifford @ Reeling Reviews

  • Excerpt: What keeps us engaged is Marinelli’s commitment, the film’s old world romance as conveyed by cinematographers Alessandro Abate and Francesco Di Giacomo and the period trappings of an unspecified era as realized by a bygone one.

Shithouse

Laura Clifford @ Reeling Reviews

  • Excerpt: The film sometimes almost lapses into ‘Sundance twee,’ but Raiff comes across as so emotionally honest in his performance that as a filmmaker he manages to stay grounded.

2020 Films In Theaters Now In Select Areas

Continue reading This Week at the Movies (Oct. 16, 2020)