This Week at the Movies (Nov. 8, 2019)

Here are some reviews of films coming out at the theater this week as well as others that may be in theaters or newly on home video.

Opening: Nov. 8, 2019

Wide (United States)

Doctor Sleep

For member reviews of this film, follow this link

Midway

For member reviews of this film, follow this link

Limited (United States)

Honey Boy

Aaron Neuwirth @ We Live Entertainment

  • Excerpt: This is a story by Shia LeBeouf, and as a work of dramatic therapy, it’s quite engaging.

2019 Films In Theaters Now In Select Areas

The Addams Family

For member reviews of this film, follow this link

The Dead Don’t Die

For member reviews of this film, follow this link

Dolemite Is My Name

For member reviews of this film, follow this link

Gemini Man

For member reviews of this film, follow this link

Harriet

For member reviews of this film, follow this link

The Irishman

For member reviews of this film, follow this link

Jojo Rabbit

For member reviews of this film, follow this link

The Lighthouse

For member reviews of this film, follow this link

Motherless Brooklyn

For member reviews of this film, follow this link

Pain and Glory

For member reviews of this film, follow this link

Parasite

For member reviews of this film, follow this link

Terminator: Dark Fate

For member reviews of this film, follow this link

Adopt a Highway

Frederic and Mary Ann Brussat @ Spirituality & Practice

  • Excerpt: Touching story of a socially awkward ex-con who discovers the value of giving and receiving.

Adopt a Highway

Shelagh Rowan-Legg @ ScreenAnarchy

  • Excerpt: Hawke’s performance, as well as great music by Jason Isbell, are compelling enough to carry it through. Marshall-Green shows some directing talent (and hopefully will have a stronger script next time), with a (unsurprisingly) sharp eye for actors in the frame and letting them breathe and move in the story.

Atlantics

Alan Mattli @ Maximum Cinema [German]

  • Excerpt: A subtly atmospheric postcolonial ghost story about love, capitalism, and the long shadow of colonialism.

El Camino: A Breaking Bad Movie

Jared Mobarak @ JaredMobarak.com

  • Excerpt: It’s fun to see these characters again and be back in this world, but “Better Call Saul” does exactly that in a substantive manner. El Camino is saddled with a hollow center.

For Sama

Charlie Juhl @ Citizen Charlie

  • Excerpt: A gut-wrenching masterpiece – a first person cinematic conscience of what the world is willing to tolerate in Syria.

The Irishman

Laura Clifford @ Reeling Reviews

  • Excerpt: : …both classic Scorsese and a departure, a mob film featuring music evocative of the time yet no Rolling Stones…youthful ambition now aged remorse, De Niro his lead for the ninth time while Pacino is cast for the first…a triumph.

The Irishman

Simon Miraudo @ Student Edge

  • Excerpt: Few films can justify a length longer than 90 minutes, but even at three-and-a-half hours, Martin Scorsese’s melancholy mob movie The Irishman still feels lean, and very mean.

The Irishman

Aaron Neuwirth @ We Live Entertainment

  • Excerpt: The results are masterful, a testament to the abilities of a filmmaker who hasn’t slowed down, doing all that’s needed to not only stay relevant but make other filmmakers try harder.

Jallikattu

Tusshar Sasi @ Filmy Sasi

  • Excerpt: Indian cinema’s unofficial ambassador of chaotic, testosterone-filled narratives and non-vegetarian food, Lijo Jose Pellissery’s ‘Jallikattu’ is a gory kaleidoscope to Kerala’s rural society that is richly in sync with its innate way of life.

The Kill Team

Frederic and Mary Ann Brussat @ Spirituality & Practice

  • Excerpt: A chilling and ethically powerful true story that asks why civilian murders keep happening in wars.

The King

Betty Jo Tucker @ ReelTalk Movie Reviews

  • Excerpt: Timothée Chalamet is fine as the King. But playing the Dauphin of France, Robert Pattinson inhabits that character with every nerve in his body.

Knives Out

Matt Oakes @

  • Excerpt: Those wanting a taste of throwback whodunnit murder mystery will find much to enjoy within Rian Johnson’s star-studded ‘Knives Out’, just know that you very well might figure it all out before the detectives do.

The Laundromat

Frederic and Mary Ann Brussat @ Spirituality & Practice

  • Excerpt: How to turn the tables on the super rich.

Light from Light

Frederic and Mary Ann Brussat @ Spirituality & Practice

  • Excerpt: An unusual, almost meditative film that reverences the mysteries of death, grief, and loneliness.

Marriage Story

Eddie Pasa @ DC Filmdom

Mountaintop

Frederic and Mary Ann Brussat @ Spirituality & Practice

  • Excerpt: A documentary about the recording of the Colorado album by Neil Young with the band Crazy Horse.

Murderous Trance

Jonathan Richards @ santafenewmexican.com

  • Excerpt: It’s a plot that reeks of artifice, of ’30s B-movie camp. The saving grace? It’s based on a true story, the bizarre “hypnosis murders” that captured headlines in Copenhagen in the early 1950s.

Pain and Glory

Tusshar Sasi @ Filmy Sasi

  • Excerpt: With his latest feature Pain and Glory, Pedro Almodóvar reiterates his mastery in making the viewers immerse in his stories and emerge with their eyes drenched, even when the characters refuse to cry. Acing the central part with life-like conviction is Antonio Banderas whose vulnerable eyes and fidgety body language catapult the film to realms of greatness.

Primal

Laura Clifford @ Reeling Reviews

  • Excerpt: This is a slapdash affair from television movie writer Richard Leder that cops from everything from “The Silence of the Lambs” to “Snakes on a Plane…” the story is such a patchwork of other genre films it makes the act of watching seem like going through the motions.

Primal

Brent McKnight @ The Last Thing I See

  • Excerpt: This movie has Nicolas Cage hunting a CGI jaguar and a political assassin on a boat. He also has a parrot sidekick that he hates. Make of that information what you will.

Queen of Hearts

Frederic and Mary Ann Brussat @ Spirituality & Practice

  • Excerpt: A portrait of an angry married woman who makes some questionable choices.

The Rabbi Goes West

Laura Clifford @ Reeling Reviews

  • Excerpt: By the end of “The Rabbi Goes West,” you may feel quite differently about the exuberant rabbi you met at the beginning.

Los Reyes

Jonathan Richards @ santafenewmexican.com

  • Excerpt: There’s love and canine laughter; there’s happiness and there’s heartbreak.

Saudi Women’s Driving School

Frederic and Mary Ann Brussat @ Spirituality & Practice

Serendipity

Bradley Gibson @ Film Threat

  • Excerpt: When New York artist Prune Nourry was diagnosed with breast cancer, she decided to document the experience…

Sorry We Missed You

Alan Mattli @ Maximum Cinema [German]

  • Excerpt: Sorry We Missed You, in all its didacticism, uncompromising bleakness, and seething rage, is right up there with the most caustic of Ken Loach’s Thatcherite dystopias.

Sorry We Missed You

Dennis Schwartz @ Dennis Schwartz Reviews

  • Excerpt: The bleak drama asks why things have to be so harsh in the workplace.

Tu me Manques

James Wegg @ JWR

  • Excerpt: A singular achievement

Zeroville

Jonathan Richards @ santafenewmexican.com

  • Excerpt: Franco gets carried away with his own genius and winds up with a bit of a mess — it’s not an unlikable mess, and it has a real passion for the movies. But as Montgomery Clift (Dave Franco) tells Vikar, “Just because you love something doesn’t mean it loves you back.”

2018 Films

The Riot Act

Mark Leeper @ SFcrowsnest

  • Excerpt: While the writing could have used more work, the production designer makes a small budget work double time; the look and feel of 1901 and 1903 Arkansas feels authentic to me…

2017 Films

Sicilian Ghost Story

Gregory J. Smalley @ 366 Weird Movies

  • Excerpt: The two young leads do an admirable job. The movie’s overall tone is low-key, elegiac, and more than a little depressing.

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