This Week at the Movies (Nov. 6, 2020)

Here are some reviews of films coming out at the theater this week as well as others that may be in theaters or newly on home video.

Opening: Nov. 6, 2020

Wide (United States)

Let Him Go

For member reviews of this film, follow this link

Limited (United States)

The Dark and the Wicked

Laura Clifford @ Reeling Reviews

  • Excerpt: I’d go so far as to say Bertino’s is the better film [than “Relic”]…if it were not for his literal last second indulgence in a jump scare which undermines his theme of the bravery called upon by love.

The Dark and the Wicked

Herman Dhaliwal @ Cinema Sanctum

  • Excerpt: Despite some derivative theming, the film has enough unsettling imagery and oppresively atmospheric filmmaking to leave an impression.

The Dark and the Wicked

Brent McKnight @ The Last Thing I See

  • Excerpt: A creepy, visceral horror tale that sticks around in a deep, hidden place.

Kindred

Mike McGranaghan @ The Aisle Seat

  • Excerpt: Kindred is an uncommonly effective horror movie because 99% of the things that happen in it are completely realistic.

Koko-Di Koko-Da

Brent McKnight @ The Last Thing I See

  • Excerpt: Think ‘Groundhog Day’ but twisted, vicious, and heartbreaking.

2020 Films In Theaters Now In Select Areas

Synchronic

For member reviews of this film, follow this link

Tenet

For member reviews of this film, follow this link

Being Mortal

Luiz Santiago @ Plano Crítico [Portuguese]

City Hall

Laura Clifford @ Reeling Reviews

  • Excerpt: Wiseman has called his latest documentary ‘anti-Trump,’ because his subjects believe in democratic norms and indeed, it is a love letter to a functioning government of the people, for the people and by the people.

Come Play

Sarah Gopaul @ Digital Journal

  • Excerpt: There are obviously scenes that require CGI, but it adds a layer of frightening magic to know the creature exists in an FX workshop somewhere… Although people may not fear a monstrous story taking over their screens, they may now just feel the briefest moment of fear when taking a selfie in a dark room.

The Come Play

Matt Oakes @

  • Excerpt: A Halloween scare-fest this is not, but it’s also not totally rotten. ‘Come Play’ features a solid-enough turn from Gillian Jacobs as a mom struggling to connect with her son on the autism spectrum but the total lack of scares and generic plotting makes this disposal studio horror movie junk.

Come Play

Dennis Schwartz @ Dennis Schwartz Reviews

  • Excerpt: Gives us a meaningful story about how damning loneliness can be to the vulnerable.

Dick Johnson Is Dead

Josh Taylor @ The Forgetful Film Critic

  • Excerpt: Director Kirsten Johnson’s heartfelt, moving new documentary, Dick Johnson Is Dead, takes ninety minutes – culled from years of shooting for the picture – to make an uneasy, gallows humor sort of peace with the finality of death. It is a love letter from a daughter to a father, and vice versa.

The Exit of the Trains

Luiz Santiago @ Plano Crítico [Portuguese]

Glauber, Claro

Luiz Santiago @ Plano Crítico [Portuguese]

His House

Herman Dhaliwal @ Cinema Sanctum

  • Excerpt: His House is a tight and haunting directorial debut from Remi Weekes. It cleverly blend horrors of the real world and of the supernatural.

His House

Mark Hobin @ Fast Film Reviews

  • Excerpt: An interesting twist on a haunted house tale.

Holidate

Nell Minow @ rogerebert.com

  • Excerpt: Holidate has nothing to say about anything. Basically, if Hallmark movies like “The Mistletoe Promise” and Netflix hits like “The Kissing Booth” are out in the world looking as beautiful as Dorian Gray, “Holidate” is the portrait hidden away in the attic getting more scrofulous by the minute.

The Life Ahead

Laura Clifford @ Reeling Reviews

  • Excerpt: …at 86 years of age, Loren returns in an Italian version of the role last played on screen by Simone Signoret in the 1977 French Oscar and Cesar winning “Madame Rosa” and does her son proud with a subtle and moving performance.

Martin Eden

Dennis Schwartz @ Dennis Schwartz Reviews

  • Excerpt: Fascinating literary adaptation.

New Order

Luiz Santiago @ Plano Crítico [Portuguese]

Nomad: In the Footsteps of Bruce Chatwin

Laura Clifford @ Reeling Reviews

  • Excerpt: In following some of the strands of Chatwin’s life, we actually learn just as much about Herzog.

The Nose or Conspiracy of Mavericks

Luiz Santiago @ Plano Crítico [Portuguese]

Our Lady of the Nile

Luiz Santiago @ Plano Crítico [Portuguese]

Over the Moon

Herman Dhaliwal @ Cinema Sanctum

  • Excerpt: I was very captivated by Over The Moon; not just by its bold, colorful, and imaginative environments and characters, but also by the emotions that drove the story along.

Over the Moon

Mark Hobin @ Fast Film Reviews

  • Excerpt: This animated tale is eclipsed by better films.

Papicha

Sarah Boslaugh @ TheArtsSTL

  • Excerpt: Beautiful cinematography by Léo Lefèvre underlines Nedjima’s creativity, in particular her eye for color in the fabrics she selects (and sometimes dyes herself), and the costumes by Catherine Cosme will convince you that Nedjima truly has a talent for fashion design.

Swimming Out Till the Sea Turns Blue

Luiz Santiago @ Plano Crítico [Portuguese]

This Is Not a Burial, It’s a Resurrection

Luiz Santiago @ Plano Crítico [Portuguese]

Welcome to Chechnya

Luiz Santiago @ Plano Crítico [Portuguese]

2019 Films

The Names of the Flowers

Luiz Santiago @ Plano Crítico [Portuguese]

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