This Week at the Movies (Jun. 25, 2021)

Here are some reviews of films coming out at the theater this week as well as others that may be in theaters or newly on home video.

Opening: Jun. 25, 2021

Wide (United States)

F9

For member reviews of this film, follow this link

Limited (United States)

I Carry You With Me

Laura Clifford @ Reeling Reviews

  • Excerpt: Intimately shot by cinematographer Juan Pablo Ramírez, who finds magic in natural light and artfully obscured compositions, the time shifting film makes a strong statement about U.S. immigration through a personal lens of sacrifice and oppression.

Too Late

Shelagh Rowan-Legg @ ScreenAnarchy

Werewolves Within

Laura Clifford @ Reeling Reviews

  • Excerpt: …offers a few laughs and nothing like a real scare, but it sure proves Sam Richardson can anchor a film and that nice guys don’t always finish last.

Brent McKnight @ The Last Thing I See

  • Excerpt: A taut whodunnit, a quirky collection of characters, a few monsters, and a couple standout performances, and Werewolves Within should satisfy horror fans, amateur sleuths, and those looking for a laugh in equal measure.

Aaron Neuwirth @ We Live Entertainment

  • Excerpt: Hey, did director Josh Ruben just sneakily deliver the best video game-to-movie adaptation?

Matt Oakes @

  • Excerpt: Josh Ruben continues to make a name for himself in the horror-comedy game with his adaptation of ‘Werewolves Within’, which employs a supremely-affable ensemble cast, a goofy premise, and plenty of directorial gags to monstrously-amusing effect. Continue to keep a close eye on this guy, he’s apt to transform into a big-timer one of these lunar rotations.

Zola

Laura Clifford @ Reeling Reviews

  • Excerpt: it is a huge disappointment that given her hand in writing the screenplay (along with playwright Jeremy O. Harris and director Janicza Bravo (“Lemon”)), Zola’s voice has been largely lost, the film losing its fizz after the initial rush of new friendship.

2021 Films In Theaters Now In Select Areas

Chaos Walking

For member reviews of this film, follow this link

The Courier

For member reviews of this film, follow this link

Godzilla vs. Kong

For member reviews of this film, follow this link

The Hitman’s Wife’s Bodyguard

For member reviews of this film, follow this link

In the Heights

For member reviews of this film, follow this link

Luca

For member reviews of this film, follow this link

12 Mighty Orphans

Sarah Boslaugh @ The Arts STL

  • Excerpt: The film’s lessons are not only delivered, they’re repeated and underlined to the point where even the most uncritical fan will beg for mercy.

12 Mighty Orphans

Nell Minow @ Movie Mom

Ainbo: Spirit of the Amazon

Sebastian Zavala @ Cinencuentro [Spanish]

  • Excerpt: You can tell that it was made by people who are passionate about their work and this story in general, which helps to make up for some of its most notable shortcomings.

Ali & Ratu Ratu Queens aka Ali & The Queens

Bavner Donaldo @ Cinejour [Indonesian]

All the Streets are Silent: The Convergence of Hip Hop and Skateboarding (1987-1997)

Brent McKnight @ The Last Thing I See

  • Excerpt: Fans of hip hop and skateboarding-particularly from this ten-year stretch-will find much to love. For others, mileage may vary, though the filmmakers still craft a compelling, at times bittersweet portrait of a specific time and place.

Catch the Fair One

Matt Oakes @

  • Excerpt: A vicious saga of exploitation and vengeance, ‘Catch the Fair One’ is a blood-splattered and grounded thriller that suffers from being oppressively bleak even as it directs focus towards an important and under-discussed topic.

Censor

C.H. Newell @ Father Son Holy Gore

  • Excerpt: What I personally take away from Censor most of all is that trauma can warp the way a person sees the world, sometimes to the detriment of their better sense and at the expense of social freedoms.

Clean

Matt Oakes @

  • Excerpt: Adrien Brody was involved on nearly every level in the conceptualization and realization of brooding revenge-thriller ‘Clean’ but with its ugly aesthetics, empty grittiness, and ridiculously hacky story of a garbage man named Clean “taking out the trash”, you really have to wonder why. Being unintentionally funny at least makes it watchable but otherwise, yikes.

A Crime on the Bayou

Laura Clifford @ Reeling Reviews

  • Excerpt: While the title of her documentary suggests a lurid true crime story, what we get instead is the eye-opening account of how one brave black man’s refusal to accept guilt where there was none…made its way up to the U.S. Supreme Court…

A Crime on the Bayou

MaryAnn Johanson @ FlickFilosopher.com

  • Excerpt: A delicately elegant documentary tale of an inconsequential moment that illustrates how abominably Black Americans have been treated in their own country, and of the friendship that grew from it.

Fatherhood

Nell Minow @ Movie Mom

Fatherhood

Betty Jo Tucker @ ReelTalk Movie Reviews

  • Excerpt: If you love movies from the heart, you can’t beat this one.

Gaia

Andrew Wyatt @ The Lens

LFG

Charlie Juhl @ Citizen Charlie

  • Excerpt: The biggest difference between the U.S. Men’s & Women’s Soccer Team is not the skeletal structure nor unequal pay – it’s that the women actually win

LFG

Lee Jutton @ Film Inquiry

  • Excerpt: This isn’t a deep investigation into the particulars of the USWNT’s case, more a robust summary with a healthy dose of rah-rah feminism. But as a portrait of one of the higher-profile fights to close the gender pay gap, it gets the job done with gusto.

The Novice

Matt Oakes @

  • Excerpt: A thrilling character study about an obsessive athlete and her self-destructive drive, Lauren Hadaway’s ‘The Novice’ explosively flips the sports drama on its head.

The Reason I Jump

MaryAnn Johanson @ FlickFilosopher.com

  • Excerpt: An extraordinary cinematic experience that immerses us into the personal landscapes of profoundly autistic, nonverbal young people. The empathy it engenders is deeply felt and enormously eye-opening.

Rise Again: Tulsa and the Red Summer

Andrea Chase @

  • Excerpt: Never strident, never glib, this is a compelling film that is unflinching in what it wants to say about the past and the present.

Rise Again: Tulsa and the Red Summer

MaryAnn Johanson @ FlickFilosopher.com

  • Excerpt: A straightforward yet shrewdly incisive work of journalism, a cutting history of white America’s backlash against Black progress. This is history that is not yet past, and must be reckoned with.

School’s Out Forever

Eddie Pasa @ DC Filmdom

The Sparks Brothers

Laura Clifford @ Reeling Reviews

  • Excerpt: Wright’s labor of love may be guilty of a fan’s over indulgence, but his subjects will charm the pants off of you, make you laugh and amaze with their creativity and sheer endurance.

Sweet Thing

Laura Clifford @ Reeling Reviews

  • Excerpt: …if this one doesn’t make a star of [Rockwell’s] eldest, Lana, the right people aren’t paying attention.

Ultrasound

Matt Oakes @

  • Excerpt: From the very first frame, the mysterious science-fiction midnighter from Rob Schroeder sets out to dazzle and bewilder audiences with a magic trick of a film. Smart and captivating, ‘Ultrasound’ comes fastened to committed performances from a game cast and a perplexing plot that leads to a resoundingly clever conclusion.

Wild Men

Matt Oakes @

  • Excerpt: Starkly funny and wholly original, the sensational Danish dark comedy ‘Wild Men’ sees a forty-something father in the midst of a midlife crisis wander into the wilderness to unwittingly befriend a drug smuggler and run from the police. An outstanding cast of characters and sparkling writing makes this one Tribeca’s best debuts.

2020 Films

Monster Hunter

For member reviews of this film, follow this link

Tenet

For member reviews of this film, follow this link

Train to Busan Presents: Peninsula

For member reviews of this film, follow this link

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