2020 Individual Film Links

For a film to get its own page on the main 2020 links page, it must receive at least 5 link submissions from our members with few exceptions. Here is a list of all films that haven’t quite reached that threshold yet. When it does, it will be moved to the main page and removed from this page.

2040

MaryAnn Johanson @ FlickFilosopher.com

  • Excerpt: A dash of eco-optimism to counter global-warming doom and gloom. Gameau is an enormously engaging fact-based dreamer offering a much-needed mindset refresh and proactive actions we can engage in now.

Nell Minow @ rogerebert.com

  • Excerpt: The biggest risk in fighting climate change is an overwhelming sense of helplessness. “2040” points a practical, achievable path toward solutions, but its most important contribution is a sense that change is possible.

#Alive

Emmanuel Báez @ Cinéfiloz [Spanish]

  • Excerpt: ‘#Vivo’ es una película de zombies #mediocre

Herman Dhaliwal @ Cinema Sanctum

  • Excerpt: #Alive’s two leads provide a lovable set of characters that are easy to root for. While it doesn’t break the mold of the zombie movie, nor does it dig into the social commentary inherit to the genre, but what makes it engaging is the willingness of filmmakers to take a more subdued and deeply human approach.

#UNFIT: The Psychology of Donald Trump

MaryAnn Johanson @ FlickFilosopher.com

  • Excerpt: Mental-health professionals, bound by ethics to point out danger, discuss how President Donald Trump is uniquely dangerous, a literal menace to society. Nay, not “discuss”: they are screaming it.

James Wegg @ JWR

  • Excerpt: “We have a duty to warn”

The 11th Green

Bev Questad @ itsjustmovies.com

  • Excerpt: Warning: though there are many pluses, like watching Burke be Barack and contemplating the competing roles of ambition and basic human nature, the plot of “11th Green,” a golf reference, is so intricate and complex that it might take two views.

1BR

Laura Clifford @ Reeling Reviews

  • Excerpt: a rarity for the genre – a horror film that is genuinely horrifying…Marmor’s film not only goes to unexpected places, it does so by mixing such disparate elements as Scientology, Polanski’s ‘Rosemary’s Baby’ and ‘The Tenant,’ and the black site torture chambers of the Iraq War all set to 60’s pop like ‘Angel of the Morning.’

Brent McKnight @ The Last Thing I See
Jared Mobarak @ JaredMobarak.com

  • Excerpt: [Sarah will] have to reconcile the uncertainty of life amongst the general population with the certainty of existence alongside those of like-minded ideals.

365 Dni

Joao Pinto @ Portal Cinema [Portuguese]

The 40-Year-Old Version

Candice Frederick @ The Wrap

9to5: The Story of a Movement

Chris Barsanti @ The Playlist

  • Excerpt: Bognar and Reichert tell the story with great sympathy while placing it in the context of wider social changes.

Abe

Frederic and Mary Ann Brussat @ SpiritualityandPractice.com

  • Excerpt: A spiritually inspiring story about how a young man tries to bring his diverse family together through food.

Mark Hobin @ Fast Film Reviews

  • Excerpt: Junior chef Abe is a bundle of fervent innocence. Unfortunately his mom and dad are demoralizing killjoys.

About a Teacher

Beverly Questad @ It’s Just Movies

  • Excerpt: The ending will cause tears, but the film itself is a glorious testament to what really did happen in a New York high school.

Adverse

Joao Pinto @ Portal Cinema [Portuguese]

  • Excerpt: Welcome back Mickey Rourke!

Airplane Mode

Betty Jo Tucker @ ReelTalk Movie Reviews

  • Excerpt: AIRPLANE MODE reminds us there is real life outside of social media. Not a bad message for our digitalized age.

Alice

Jared Mobarak @ The Film Stage

  • Excerpt: To watch Piponnier weigh that abhorrent truth is to witness the internal struggle every woman who’s experienced this type of coerced acquiescence faces.

All Hail the Popcorn King

Mark Leeper @ Mark Leeper’s Reviews

  • Excerpt: A study of the surrealist writer Joe R. Lansdale; his coterie of twisted but loyal fans makes for a fun film.

All the Bright Places

Candice Frederick @ New York Times
Betty Jo Tucker @ ReelTalk Movie Reviews

  • Excerpt: This outstanding teenage tearjerker impressed me with its honesty, compassion, and sensitive performances by Elle Fanning and Justice Smith, who project amazing chemistry together on screen.

All Together Now

Herman Dhaliwal @ Cinema Sanctum

  • Excerpt: The film is deeply moving and Brett Haley’s affection for his characters shines through. It cements Auli?i Cravalho as a major talent who is more than just a great singing voice.

Betty Jo Tucker @ ReelTalk Movie Reviews

  • Excerpt: When the movie ended, my husband said he wants to see a sequel. I agree, for one movie about the great Amber Appleton is not enough.

An American Pickle

Laura Clifford @ Reeling Reviews

  • Excerpt: One wishes “An American Pickle’s” script had been tuned a bit more tightly, but Seth Rogen’s man from the shtetl may just have you craving pickles with a chaser of seltzer.

Mark Hobin @ Fast Film Reviews

  • Excerpt: Seth Rogen’s ability to play two different people is indeed convincing but the rest of this account isn’t very interesting or funny.

The Andorra Hustle

Bev Questad @ itsjustmovies.com

  • Excerpt: To be honest, there are so many factors, evasions, lies, circumstances, possible bribes, and competing interests, that I cannot fully understand or explain the convoluted plot of “The Andorra Hustle.”

Anelka: Missunderstood

João Pinto @ Portal Cinema [Portuguese]

Arkansas

Herman Dhaliwal @ Cinema Sanctum

  • Excerpt: It’s a fairly simple and modest crime film that doesn’t overstay its welcome.

Jared Mobarak @ The Film Stage

  • Excerpt: Arkansas is thus a series of trust exercises between idiots, the fearful, and the [over-confident]. Hemsworth and Duke are therefore the perfect team: brawny and scrawny.

Artemis Fowl

Mark Hobin @ Fast Film Reviews

  • Excerpt: Easily one of the worst movies of the year. Given the state of film in 2020, that’s really saying something.

MaryAnn Johanson @ FlickFilosopher.com

  • Excerpt: A disaster of a kids’ fantasy caper; feels like it’s making up the plot as it goes. A mishmash of manufactured wonder: characters barely sketched, action seemingly setting up future Disney World rides.

Mike McGranaghan @ The Aisle Seat

  • Excerpt: Destined to bore children and adults alike.

Assassin 33 A.D.

Gregory J. Smalley @ 366 Weird Movies

  • Excerpt: Donnie Darko’ meets ‘The Passion of the Christ’ done on the kind of budget usually reserved for an episode of ‘The 700 Club.’

Athlete A

Nell Minow @ rogerebert.com

  • Excerpt: One former gymnast says, “The line between tough coaching and abuse gets blurred.” This may be what it takes to win gold at the Olympics, but is it worth the cost?

Ava

Rich Cline @ Shadows on the Wall

  • Excerpt: Director Tate Taylor can’t resist a nonstop barrage of cliches as the story slickly flits through a series of glamorous international locations

Aviva

Laura Clifford @ Reeling Reviews

  • Excerpt: …a glorious, sensual, compelling dive into a romantic relationship expressed with dance and gender fluidity…a stunningly original work of art, directed with the same awareness of movement by Yakin as evinced by his dancers.

Axone

Herman Dhaliwal @ Cinema Sanctum

  • Excerpt: Axone is a very important film, but what helps it is that is never feels like an important film while you’re watching it, and exploring everyday life in India from a unique perspective.

Baaghi 3

Kathy Gibson @ Access Bollywood

Babyteeth

Chris Barsanti @ Slant
Laura Clifford @ Reeling Reviews

  • Excerpt: First time feature director Shannon Murphy turns an Australian stage play (adapted by its author Rita Kalnejais) into a dramedy about embracing life with strong subtexts about psychiatry versus art therapy and prescribed versus recreational drug abuse.

Mark Hobin @ Fast Film Reviews

  • Excerpt: An unconventional coming of age drama featuring an outstanding performance from Eliza Scanlen.

Jared Mobarak @ JaredMobarak.com

  • Excerpt: It’s a messy existence that mirrors the unpredictability of life and yet the filmmakers never chastise their characters or moralize their actions.

Bacurau

Laura Clifford @ Reeling Reviews

  • Excerpt: While Blumhouse provided popcorn with their “The Hunt,” cowriter/directors Kleber Mendonça Filho (“Neighboring Sounds”) and his “Aquarius” production designer Juliano Dornelles offer a three star Michelin meal with this Cannes 2019 Jury Prize winner.

Herman Dhaliwal @ Cinema Sanctum

  • Excerpt: It’s a passionate film that does a good job at balancing the socio-political themes and the action. Its filmmaking is strong enough to leave an impression no matter where you’re from.

Gregory J. Smalley @ 366 Weird Movies

  • Excerpt: Bacurau’ is not only a quality film, it’s a good way to support small (and big) businesses in a dry season.

Ronald wilkinson @ ItsJustMovies.com

  • Excerpt: As the life flows out the holes in the water truck you might wish you, too, had drank the Kool-Aid.

Bad Education

Mark Hobin @ Fast Film Reviews

  • Excerpt: Monetary fraud and the subsequent cover-up could have been dry material but it’s presented with a healthy dose of levity. This is quite a feat because there’s nothing inherently funny about what happened.

MaryAnn Johanson @ FlickFilosopher.com

  • Excerpt: A laugh-until-you-cry dramedy burlesque, brilliantly structured and horrifically compelling, about the endless grift that passes for an economy in America. Hugh Jackman is at the peak of his powers.

Jared Mobarak @ The Film Stage

  • Excerpt: Bad Education is a roller coaster ride from start to finish as the surface sheen of success is peeled back to reveal the proverbial bodies buried to achieve it.

Betty Jo Tucker @ ReelTalk Movie Reviews

  • Excerpt: BAD EDUCATION isn’t a bad movie. But it left me with an emptiness I can’t explain.

Banana Split

Laura Clifford @ Reeling Reviews

  • Excerpt: A little more experience behind the camera would afford that extra bit of polish, but that’s a mere quibble given the film’s strong cast and energetic filmmaking. “Banana Split” is a refreshing treat.

Mike McGranaghan @ The Aisle Seat

  • Excerpt: A teen comedy that combines the emotional honesty of an ’80s John Hughes flick with a very modern social media-influenced sensibility.

Frank Ochieng @ Flick Feast

  • Excerpt: …[an] unconventionally perceptive and engaging coming-of-age female friendship/romancer. Inherently touching and liberating, Banana Split an endearing account of cemented youthful female relations

The Banker

Ron Wilkinson @ itsjustmovies.com

  • Excerpt: An entertaining story about a good hearted scam that did the right thing.

Be Water

Dennis Schwartz @ Dennis Schwartz Reviews

  • Excerpt: Yet another documentary on the Hong Kong superstar Bruce Lee.

The Beach House

Herman Dhaliwal @ Cinema Sanctum

  • Excerpt: It’s just a bit too minimal of a genre exercise, and while it does it well, it doesn’t do a lot to create a lasting impression. That of course doesn’t diminish the good work put in by filmmaker Jeffrey A. Brown and star Liana Liberato.

James Jay Edwards @ The Big Smoke America
Beverly Questad @ The Film Stage

  • Excerpt: While it remains a success, what that apocalyptic world says about our own is heady enough to have facilitated dealing with [the characters’] personal drama too.

Dennis Schwartz @ Dennis Schwartz Reviews

  • Excerpt: It fails in the third act to deliver much excitement after its solid set-up.

Beanpole

Laura Clifford @ Reeling Reviews

  • Excerpt: “Beanpole’s” most distinctive element is its use of color, Sergey Ivanov’s production design limiting its spectrum to the brilliant greens symbolizing life, rich golden ochers and muted reds.

Jonathan Richards @ santafenewmexican.com

  • Excerpt: The film explores death, blackmail, betrayal, catastrophic injury, illness, and women’s struggle to survive as second-class citizens in the course and aftermath of war. These are the grim veins mined in a powerful film that will compel your attention even as you fight the urge to turn away.

Rene Sanchez @ Cine Sin Fronteras [Spanish]

  • Excerpt: Beanpole es un crudo y complejo drama que observa el costo de la guerra a través de la afligida mirada de un par de mujeres que buscan rehacer su vida y encontrar un poco de esperanza en medio de la tragedia.

Ron Wilkinson @ itsjustmovies.com

  • Excerpt: An explosive look at the horrors of war grounded by great performances from every person on the screen.

Beats

Laura Clifford @ Reeling Reviews

  • Excerpt: Brian Welsh’s timely film celebrates civil disobedience through a coming-of-age lens at a time when authoritarianism is on the rise and the youngest generation is at the forefront of the human rights battle… The moving, central heartbeat of “Beats” is how Welsh lets us see Spanner through Johnno’s eyes.

Herman Dhaliwal @ Cinema Sanctum

  • Excerpt: I was quite charmed and affected by it. It has a very big heart, one that beats as hard and loud as the music itself.

Brent McKnight @ The Last Thing I See

  • Excerpt: Beats captures the highs and lows, the simultaneous hope and desolation, and, most of all, the wild, anarchic freedom of youth and having no idea what you’re doing, but plowing full speed ahead, consequences be damned.

James Wegg @ JWR

  • Excerpt: “Sometimes, we’ve all just gotta jump”!

Becoming

MaryAnn Johanson @ FlickFilosopher.com

  • Excerpt: Verges on an ad for Michelle Obama’s memoir, but a sincerely warm one. We glimpse a woman authentically funny, self-aware, down-to-earth. Like spending time with a friend you didn’t realize you had.

James Jay Edwards @ The Big Smoke America
Brent McKnight @ The Last Thing I See

  • Excerpt: Even stuck in quarantine, there’s still been a steady stream of horror movies to check out. ‘Behind You’ is also a movie.

Eddie Pasa @ DC Filmdom

  • Excerpt: Please note: we are switching site hosts. Sorry for the technical difficulties.

Benjamin

Herman Dhaliwal @ Cinema Sanctum

  • Excerpt: Benjamin is a film that wears its heart on its sleeve, and while it may seem like another quirky, unassuming indie on the surface, but underneath all that is something that is really thoughtful, introspective, and unafraid of leaving certain questions unanswered.

Beyond the Horizon

Alan Mattli @ Maximum Cinema [German]

  • Excerpt: Winner of the 2020 Best Swiss Film award, “Beyond the Horizon” is an uneven but emotionally satisfying coming-of-age drama.

Beyond the Visible: Hilma af Klint

MaryAnn Johanson @ FlickFilosopher.com

  • Excerpt: Wonder and mystery dwells in the work of forgotten abstract pioneer Hilma af Klint. Sarcasm and side-eye for the male- and money-dominated fine-art establishment dwells in this superb doc about her.

Bhangra Paa Le

Kathy Gibson @ Access Bollywood

Big Time Adolescence

Karl Delossantos @ Smash Cut Reviews
Herman Dhaliwal @ Cinema Sanctum

  • Excerpt: It might be covering familiar thematic ground, but the emotions and relationships still ring true. Pete Davidson leaves a strong, impactful impression.

Jared Mobarak @ JaredMobarak.com

  • Excerpt: Even when things go haywire and lean heavily onto the humor of each situation, the film refuses to lose its dramatic edge. There are stakes to what is happening.

Frank Ochieng @ Flick Feast

  • Excerpt: Unfairly, Big Time Adolescence suffers from the standard formula of routine coming-of-age comedies that follow the predictable pattern of snarky amusement and surfacing angst.

Black Is King

Josh Taylor @ www.forgetfulfilmcritic.com

  • Excerpt: As a middle-aged white guy, I’m certainly no expert on the myriad references to African culture contained within Black is King, but I know they’re there, and Beyoncé frames them in such a way that makes me thirsty to know more. Chief among my interests is the film’s ties to Afrofuturism.

Black Water: Abyss

Mike McGranaghan @ The Aisle Seat

  • Excerpt: A decent B-movie experience.

Brent McKnight @ The Last Thing I See

  • Excerpt: Never tries to be much beyond a slice of B-movie man-versus-nature terror, but it does what it does effectively and efficiently, providing tension, scares, and gnashing crocodile teeth

Blackbird

MaryAnn Johanson @ FlickFilosopher.com

  • Excerpt: The to-die-for cast can’t quite save this melodrama from its trite obviousness, in which rage and grief are matters of tasteful, upscale lifestyle. But they at least they make it passingly watchable.

Jared Mobarak @ The Film Stage

  • Excerpt: As sweet as it is devastating, we feel the swirl of emotions and relate to the resonant push and pull between love asking for time and knowing there’s none left.

Betty Jo Tucker @ ReelTalk Movie Reviews

  • Excerpt: We forget about Susan Sarandon the movie star as we watch her character struggling with simple things such as getting out of bed in the morning or going up and down a staircase. And we see the love deep within those big eyes as she interacts with her loved ones during her last weekend with them.

Blessed Child

Josh Taylor @ www.forgetfulfilmcritic.com

  • Excerpt: I finished Blessed Child feeling like I only knew half of Cara Jones’s story when it came to her escaping the cult in which she was raised. She does, however, document with a raw openness and vulnerability her desperate attempt to keep her family even as she walks away from the religion that they still hold dear.

Blood and Money

Betty Jo Tucker @ ReelTalk Movie Reviews

  • Excerpt: Tom Berenger endows the lead character with a world-weary persona that moved me in every scene of this excellent snowy thriller.

Blood Hunters

Brent McKnight @ The Last Thing I See

  • Excerpt: When you hire people for your movie who know how to fight a funny thing happens, the fights look good. Too bad that’s all ‘Blood Hunters’ has going for it.

Blood Machines

Jared Mobarak @ The Film Stage

  • Excerpt: That it’s all shot with an obvious male gaze can often undermine [its feminist] themes too, but it is gorgeous just the same.

Blood on Her Name

Brent McKnight @ The Last Thing I See

  • Excerpt: A strong lead performance, smooth pace, dour visual aesthetic, and intriguing subversions of established expectations offer up a solid slice of hard-luck small town neo-noir.

Jared Mobarak @ The Film Stage

  • Excerpt: The film is only 80-minutes, but it’s not until the end that things really start moving because that’s when the time to act overcomes the desire to think.

C.H. Newell @ Father Son Holy Gore

  • Excerpt: Blood On Her Name efficiently tells a cracking story while simultaneously tackling issues of gender and morality, both of which are ever present and more than occasionally problematic in the (neo)noir genre.

Shelagh Rowan-Legg @ ScreenAnarchy

  • Excerpt: Blood on Her Name shows not only how most of us could never cope with a terrible crime, but how those already under the thumb of the system can likely never escape it.

Blood Quantum

Herman Dhaliwal @ Cinema Sanctum

  • Excerpt: Blood Quantum is a relatively bare bones zombie flick with undercooked drama that doesn’t totally do justice to its rich ideas. However, it contains enough excitement and action to satisfy fans of the genre.

Bloody Nose, Empty Pockets

Chris Barsanti @ The Playlist
Laura Clifford @ Reeling Reviews

  • Excerpt: Spending twenty-four hours with a bunch of bar flies has never been this mesmerizing, this profound, this funny and sad…an outstanding example of what can be done with a tiny budget, innovative filmmakers and a well assembled ensemble.

Body Cam

Mark Harris @ Black Horror Movies

The Booksellers

Jared Mobarak @ JaredMobarak.com

  • Excerpt: The stories told are equally fascinating and entertaining with each interviewee letting his/her eccentricities and sense of humor shine through.

Born to Play

Bev Questad @ itsjustmovies.com

  • Excerpt: Lieberman builds suspense in the lead-up to each game, but she also promotes respect, support and interest in the phenomenal world of women football players.

Brahms: The Boy II

Mark Hobin @ Fast Film Reviews

  • Excerpt: No spoilers, but this review contains a more creative plot twist than the movie itself.

Frank Ochieng @ Flick Feast

  • Excerpt: Clearly, naughty Brahms from 2016’s The Boy needed more of a supernatural spanking than he does a needless follow-up in a dull and creepy cornball sequel…the belabored subpar chills that aimlessly wallow in manufactured weirdness and waste.

Breaking Fast

Rick Aragon @ Rick’s Texan Reviews

Browse

Eddie Pasa @ DC Filmdom

Buffaloed

Herman Dhaliwal @ Cinema Sanctum

  • Excerpt: It’s an exhilarating ride that centers itself on a fascinating and effortlessly compelling character, brilliantly portrayed by Zoey Deutch. The messaging and structure is largely familiar, but the story still remains timely.

Mike McGranaghan @ The Aisle Seat

  • Excerpt: Zoey Deutch gives a great performance in a movie that deftly mixes comedy with social commentary.

Jared Mobarak @ JaredMobarak.com

  • Excerpt: Leave it to an actual Buffalonian to write a screenplay set in the city without one mention or frame of snow.

Frank Ochieng @ Flick Feast

  • Excerpt: Wexler’s bubbly blue-collar comedy Buffaloed is a wacky Valentine ode to the chilly upstate New York-based enclave. An unconventional character study that wants to reach for every nuanced nugget it sends out.

Bulbbul

Herman Dhaliwal @ Cinema Sanctum

  • Excerpt: While Bulbbul is perhaps not scary in the traditional sense, it is scary in how it digs into the realities that women deal with. It’s an enthralling and visually stunning fable from start to finish.

Bull

Jared Mobarak @ The Film Stage

  • Excerpt: Instead of sending her leads down a road that’ll change their circumstances, Silverstein provides each a crucial confidante to silently endure the unavoidable pain with them.

Beverly Questad @ It’s Just Movies

  • Excerpt: Annie Silverstein, an award-winning filmmaker from the get-go, is the director, teaming up with her husband, Johnny McAllister, to write this new kind of screenplay where the actors seem to be simply playing themselves.

Ronald wilkinson @ itsjustmovies.com

  • Excerpt: Everybody loses and gets old. It is how one loses and gets old that counts.

Burden

Frederic and Mary Ann Brussat @ Spirituality & Practice

  • Excerpt: True story about a black Christian minister who practices love, forgiveness, and reconciliation by befriending a Ku Klux Klan member.

Laura Clifford @ Reeling Reviews

  • Excerpt: If only Heckler hadn’t weighted Mike’s attraction to Judy over the Reverend’s hard won influence, he could have made an end run on the oft-lamented ‘white savior movie’ with his black hero, but while the film has its flaws, it works more often than not, buoyed by good performances.

Frank Ochieng @ Flick Feast

  • Excerpt: …a compelling but seemingly trite tension tale. Redemption expositions are cozy and thought-provoking in concept but nicely wrapped feel-good fables such as Burden seem to be holding back the realness of its provoked outrage.

The Burnt Orange Heresy

Laura Clifford @ Reeling Reviews

  • Excerpt: Debicki and Sutherland enjoy a beautiful give and take while Jagger enjoys a sympathy for the devil…But one begins to wonder if Bang is simply being typecast as shallow art world figures or if the actor himself is merely glib.

Laura Clifford @ Reeling Reviews

  • Excerpt: Debicki and Sutherland enjoy a beautiful give and take while Jagger enjoys a sympathy for the devil…But one begins to wonder if Bang is simply being typecast as shallow art world figures or if the actor himself is merely glib.

Charlie Juhl @ Citizen Charlie

  • Excerpt: Do the powerful own a monopoly on truth? The optimists out there may be vexed with director Giuseppe Capotondi’s answer to that question.

Mike McGranaghan @ The Aisle Seat

  • Excerpt: The film offers one hypnotic twist after another.

Camp Cold Brook

Ron Wilkinson @ itsjustmovies.com

  • Excerpt: Come to camp but skip the swim lessons.

Capital in the Twenty-First Century

Laura Clifford @ Reeling Reviews

  • Excerpt: Perhaps one of the most compelling aspects of Pemberton’s documentary is a psychological study that was done with hundreds of Monopoly players…

MaryAnn Johanson @ FlickFilosopher.com

  • Excerpt: Attention, social justice warriors. French economist Thomas Piketty’s howl-of-rage academic treatise is now a hugely engaging documentary, eye-opening and brutally entertaining. Man the barricades!

Josh Taylor @ www.forgetfulfilmcritic.com

  • Excerpt: Capital in the Twenty-First Century is a brilliant translation of Piketty’s ideas to a visual medium. It is required viewing for anyone who wants to understand how things came to be this way and how we can change our situation for the better.

Capone

Herman Dhaliwal @ Cinema Sanctum

  • Excerpt: I’m not totally convinced that Capone adds up to all that much, but there is not a single dull moment. It’s a relentlessly nasty, weird, bewildering, and immensely entertaining experience from start to finish.

Jared Mobarak @ The Film Stage

  • Excerpt: A “Twilight Zone” riff on the “This is Your Life” template wherein the subject is transported through a Jacob’s Ladder-esque hole towards oblivion.

Cargo

Herman Dhaliwal @ Cinema Sanctum

  • Excerpt: There is a lot to love about how Arati Kadav marries mythology and science fiction. It’s a dynamic and imaginative debut that is tryly unlike anything you’ll find in Indian cinema today.

Kathy Gibson @ Access Bollywood

Celebration

Sarah Boslaugh @ TheArtsSTL

  • Excerpt: It doesn’t take long to fathom the reasons Bergé did not want this film released, and, personal issues aside, it’s one of the more unusual fashion documentaries ever made.

Centigrade

Laura Clifford @ Reeling Reviews

  • Excerpt: Walsh and his two actors make the most out of their singular location, one which may have been easy on the budget but which surely posed technical and artistic challengers. They’ve risen to them.

Mike McGranaghan @ The Aisle Seat

  • Excerpt: I mean it as a total compliment to say Centigrade will drive you nuts.

Dennis Schwartz @ Dennis Schwartz Reviews

  • Excerpt: The low-budget film is enhanced by its fine technical work, but stalled by its cold story that never quite warms up.

Chemical Hearts

Rich Cline @ Shadows on the Wall

  • Excerpt: There’s a darkly intriguing tone to this thoughtful teen drama. Although it’s rather mopey and naggingly disconnected from reality, like most films based on young-adult novels

James Jay Edwards @ The Big Smoke America

Chhapaak

Kathy Gibson @ Access Bollywood
Tusshar Sasi @ Filmy Sasi

  • Excerpt: Meghna Gulzar ‘s film exposes how men empowered by patriarchy nip women off their dreams by throwing acid on them. Deepika Padukone and Vikrant Massey are wonderful in this sensitive, deeply disturbing film.

Una Chica Invisible

Joao Pinto @ Portal Cinema [Portuguese]

Children of the Sea

Allyson Johnson @ TheYoungFolks.com

Choked: Paisa Bolta Hai

Herman Dhaliwal @ Cinema Sanctum

  • Excerpt: It is ultimately a minor addition to Anurag Kashyap’s filmography, but it’s still evocative, thoughtful, sly, and features a great lead performance from Saiyami Kher.

Circus of Books

Karl Delossantos @ Smash Cut Reviews

  • Excerpt: Where the Circus of Books lacks focus, it makes up for in pure heart and a touching personal story that gives hope to a community.

City Dreamers

Laura Clifford @ Reeling Reviews

  • Excerpt: celebrates four vibrant octo and nonagenarians recounting their upbringing, education and careers all framed by the various cities that shaped them and those that felt their influence.

Clementine

Jared Mobarak @ The Film Stage

  • Excerpt: Clementine never relinquishes its quiet drama to [possible suspense]. The focus remains on Karen, Lana, and their futures away from their respective manipulators.

Clover

Jared Mobarak @ The Film Stage

  • Excerpt: Things do get extra silly by the end, but the blackly comedic tone is consistent enough to allow for such a wild turn of events to feel at home nonetheless.

Coastal Elites

Rich Cline @ Shadows on the Wall

  • Excerpt: It zeroes in on politics, with only tangential references to Covid-19 or Black Lives Matter. Which makes it somewhat shouty

The Collini Case

Laura Clifford @ Reeling Reviews

  • Excerpt: Beautifully photographed by Jakub Bejnarowicz (Netflix’s ‘Perfume’) in widescreen with a color palette of green, blue and blond, the film is gripping from start to its shattering finish.

Eddie Pasa @ DC Filmdom

The Columnist

Brent McKnight @ The Last Thing I See

  • Excerpt: Uses biting humor to create a scathing indictment of the way we treat each other in this Very-Online world in which we live and examine the real-world toll of the seemingly empty words we so often throw into the social media void with little consideration.

Come As You Are

Laura Clifford @ Reeling Reviews

  • Excerpt: …feels surprisingly fresh, favoring the warmth and humor derived from real friendship and romance over the more obvious sexual hijinx one might expect.

Candice Frederick @ The Wrap
James Wegg @ JWR

  • Excerpt: Can you walk in my shoes (or chair)?

Ron Wilkinson @ itsjustmovies.com

  • Excerpt: http://itsjustmovies.com/review-come-as-you-are/

Come Away

Kyle Anderson @ Nerdist

Come to Daddy

Laura Clifford @ Reeling Reviews

  • Excerpt: …while the film can be wedged into the horror genre, it’s more of a darkly comedic psychological thriller which, unfortunately, devolves into an ultra violent gross-out spectacle, almost entirely losing the father-son reunion story at its heart.

Frank Ochieng @ Flick Feast

  • Excerpt: Thoroughly cringy and calculating, the calling card for Come to Daddy will make gagging to the peculiar whims of this welcoming warped B-movie blister a fine goosebump gem to consider with passing cynicism.

Corpus Christi

Laura Clifford @ Reeling Reviews

  • Excerpt: Shooting in beautifully composed 2.39 : 1 widescreen, director of photography Piotr Sobocinski Jr. favors the greens of rebirth accented by Madonna hued blues…Bielenia is perfectly cast, his cinematic face capable of appearing both demonic and angelic, the actor intensely committed.

MaryAnn Johanson @ FlickFilosopher.com

  • Excerpt: This profoundly empathetic tale of an unlikely spiritual leader is a condemnation of the dogmatism and narrowmindedness of the Catholic Church and a provocative exploration of guilt and redemption.

Coup 53

Laura Clifford @ Reeling Reviews

  • Excerpt: It unspools like a political thriller, but its real world consequences are dead serious.

Crawlers

Mark Harris @ Black Horror Movies

The Crimes That Bind

Joao Pinto @ Portal Cinema [Portuguese]

Cryptopia

Bavner Donaldo @ CINEJOUR [Indonesian]

Cryptopia: Bitcoin, Blockchains and the Future of the Internet

Andrea Chase @ KillerMovieReviews.com

  • Excerpt: It takes us on a rollicking journey through the history of Bitcoin: its detractors, its disciples, and its philosophers.

Cuties

Emmanuel Báez @ Cinéfiloz [Spanish]

  • Excerpt: ‘Cuties’ desafía a la reflexión sobre la influencia del mundo digital en las niñas

Herman Dhaliwal @ Cinema Sanctum

  • Excerpt: Maïmouna Doucouré handles the material in a way that is artful, sensitive, yet bold and purposeful. While not flawless, it rings true and explores an aspect of growing up that has often been ignored.

The Dalai Lama: Scientist

Dennis Schwartz @ Dennis Schwartz Reviews

  • Excerpt: Gets into interesting subject matter.

Darkness Falls

Eddie Pasa @ DC Filmdom

Darkness in Tenement 45

Joao Pinto @ Portal Cinema [Portuguese]

  • Excerpt: It has some problems, but has some good ideas.

David Byrne’s American Utopia

Jared Mobarak @ JaredMobarak.com

  • Excerpt: I just can’t say that the finished product is essential beyond its purpose of transferring a once-in-a-lifetime experience to the masses.

Dead Dicks

Gregory J. Smalley @ 366 Weird Movies

  • Excerpt: …warts and all, ‘Dead Dicks’ is worth a watch to those who find the premise or the mental illness theme compelling. It lags in the middle with a bit too much dialogue, but it starts the third act with two twists that come in quick succession, and ends on a strong note.

The Death of Dick Long

Gregory J. Smalley @ 366 Weird Movies

  • Excerpt: …around the midway point, ‘Dick Long’ takes its outrageous premise and, unexpectedly, wrings serious drama out of it.

The Decline

João Pinto @ Portal Cinema [Portuguese and English]

The Deeper You Dig

Laura Clifford @ Reeling Reviews

  • Excerpt: a stylish looking, well acted film that examines the strong bond between a mother and daughter both before and after death with plenty of creep factor for genre buffs.

Brent McKnight @ The Last Thing I See

  • Excerpt: Lots of families have favorite shared activities, but not many mother/father/daughter units make unsettling indie horror about guilt and grief.

Defending Jacob

Federico Furzan @ Cinelipsis [Spanish]

Denise Ho: Becoming the Song

James Wegg @

  • Excerpt: “Keeping silent is more terrifying”

Desert One

Sarah Boslaugh @

  • Excerpt: Desert One will give you an appreciation for how complex a problem Carter faced, and how easily, in real life, things can go wrong.

Laura Clifford @ Reeling Reviews

  • Excerpt: a compelling, fully fledged historical document of a doomed rescue mission. Kopple’s intent to honor these men’s bravery comes through loud and clear.

Bev Questad @ itsjustmovies.com

  • Excerpt: Barbara Kopple’s film on the 1979 attempt to rescue Americans captured inside the American Embassy in Iran is important for two reasons. First, it is a record of significance in American history. Second, it is a primer on all the things that could possibly go wrong in a sure-thing rescue mission.

The Devil All the Time

Emmanuel Báez @ Cinéfiloz [Spanish]

  • Excerpt: ‘El Diablo a Todas Horas’ es un relato de maldad y corrupción que no adquiere fuerza por un guion débil

Laura Clifford @ Reeling Reviews

  • Excerpt: …such an over the top piece of southern fried Gothic it is difficult to tell whether [Campos] intended his faithful retelling as drama or black comedy…a problem of tone and perhaps overreach that Campos never gets his arms around

Rich Cline @ Shadows on the Wall

  • Excerpt: Watching it is like binging a grisly rural crime miniseries with so many intriguing characters and plot-strands that we’re not quite sure where to look

Mark Hobin @ Fast Film Reviews

  • Excerpt: Murder as many people you like in a movie and nobody bats an eye, but kill a dog and you’ve gone too far. You have been warned.

Diablo Rojo PTY

Brent McKnight @ The Last Thing I See

  • Excerpt: A strange, dark, witch-infested descent into hell.

Disappearance at Clifton Hill

Mark Hobin @ Fast Film Reviews

  • Excerpt: Music and mood are among the movie’s few, albeit considerable, strengths.

Shelagh Rowan-Legg @ ScreenAnarchy

  • Excerpt: Disappearance at Clifton Hill gives us a good thriller that (like most good thrillers) asks more questions that it answers, and shows us characters both stuck in place, going in circles, and struggling to get out.

Gregory J. Smalley @ 366 Weird Movies

  • Excerpt: Full of psychological unease rather than jump scares, Clifton Hill plays well within its budget. Superior writing elevates it from merely a ‘modest thriller’ to a ‘modest-but-clever thriller.’

Ron Wilkinson @ itsjustmovies.com

  • Excerpt: The energy of Niagara Falls segues into a carnival of cheap tricks in this methodical thriller.

Disclosure

MaryAnn Johanson @ FlickFilosopher.com

  • Excerpt: Terrific doc unpacks trans representation in Hollywood, unspoken attitudes about gender, sexuality, and race that most people, trans and cis, may never have clocked before… ideas that affect us all.

Divos!

Eddie Pasa @ DC Filmdom

  • Excerpt: Divos! is a punchy charmer and rejoices in petty awkwardness, manically (or maniacally?) driven with the extreme motivation of those folks you knew in high school who took the yearly plays way too seriously.

The Dog Doc

Frederic and Mary Ann Brussat @ Spirituality & Practice

  • Excerpt: An information-rich documentary about a compassionate and holistic approach to dog care.

Jared Mobarak @ JaredMobarak.com

  • Excerpt: Meehl’s documentary proves a crucial piece to the puzzle [of legitimizing alternative treatments] beyond merely focusing on one man or one clinic with complete idolatry.

James Wegg @ JWR

  • Excerpt: “Send us your hopeless”

Dreamland

Jared Mobarak @ JaredMobarak.com

  • Excerpt: It often feels devoid of both rhyme and reason. That’s what makes it so divisive—you either embrace the ride or revolt against it.

Driven

Eddie Pasa @ DC Filmdom

  • Excerpt: This microbudget cross between Collateral, Clerks, and The First Power revels in simultaneously making peace with and having fun with its limitations.

Ronald wilkinson @ ItsJustMovies.com

  • Excerpt: A stand up comedy routine delivered while driving an Uber car is still a stand up routine.

Driven to Abstraction

Rick Aragon @ Rick’s Texan Reviews

Driveways

Laura Clifford @ Reeling Reviews

  • Excerpt: this isn’t just another one of those ‘old person/young person transformational friendship movies,’ instead a more thoughtful rumination on assessing our pasts and forging new paths told with great sensitivity and a very strong sense of place.

Herman Dhaliwal @ Cinema Sanctum

  • Excerpt: Andrew Ahn is deeply confident in his ability to get across an immeasurable sense of humanity and warmth through a fairly minimal setup and relaxed plotting.

Jared Mobarak @ JaredMobarak.com

  • Excerpt: So while Driveways may have a simple narrative, [it holds] a profound weight [to become] a distillation of what it means to be alive, fallible, and willing to be better.

Beverly Questad @ It’s Just Movies

  • Excerpt: In one of the last performances before his death on April 15, 2020, Brian Dennehy brought a simple little film to glory. Cast as a retired old fogey named Del, who has lived in the neighborhood since he married about 50 years ago, Dennehy makes this film glow.

Earth

Bev Questad @ itsjustmovies.com

  • Excerpt: But when you watch the full movie it is hard to stay awake. The film team has forgotten the lives of their men and what was significant in their video captures. Long times are spent with a still camera focused on bare, dusty, repetitive earth moving.

The Eight Hundred

Rich Cline @ Shadows on the Wall

  • Excerpt: The film ends up as a rousing historical spectacle rather than an involving journey. Still, there’s never a dull moment over the long running time.

Ellie & Abbie (& Ellie’s Dead Aunt)

Glenn Dunks @ ScreenHub

  • Excerpt: But beneath its paranormal fluffiness, there lies something stirring in its fusing of queer generations. LGBTIQ+ folk remain self-educators of their shared history, with stories of Stonewall, Oxford Street and beyond certainly not taught in the classroom by teachers and textbooks.

Endless

Mike McGranaghan @ The Aisle Seat

  • Excerpt: Endless is not a particularly good movie, but it does offer more evidence to back up my belief that Alexandra Shipp has what it takes to be a major star.

Enola Holmes

Charlie Juhl @ Citizen Charlie

  • Excerpt: Unconnected with the larger Sherlock world, Enola relies more on idiosyncratic quirks and twitchy editing at the expense of a more quixotic mystery to solve.

Entwined

Andrew Wyatt @ The Lens

Epicentro

Bev Questad @ itsjustmovies.com

  • Excerpt: But Hubert Sauper, one of the most famous and most respected documentarians in the world, has been identified as creating a new form of cinema coined “cinema du lien” – the cinema of contact.

Escape From Pretoria

Herman Dhaliwal @ Cinema Sanctum

  • Excerpt: While I wished Escape From Pretoria dived deeper into the politics of its era and broader socio-political context, it still delivers a rock solid prison break movie that never loses touch of the humanity behind the characters.

Eurovision Song Contest: The Story of Fire Saga

Laura Clifford @ Reeling Reviews

  • Excerpt: Along with his ‘Funny or Die’ writing colleague Andrew Steele, Ferrell aces several inspired running jokes including one paying homage to “Elf.”

Mark Hobin @ Fast Film Reviews

  • Excerpt: The songs (like “Volcano Man”) are sublime. The story not so much.

Simon Miraudo @ Student Edge

  • Excerpt: Eurovision was cancelled in 2020 because of COVID-19. So, sure, let Will Ferrell and Rachel McAdams host their own.

Betty Jo Tucker @ ReelTalk Movie Reviews

  • Excerpt: Across the screen fun music bursts — enough to quench many fans thirsts. Hooray for comedies like this; it put me in a state of bliss!

Even When I Fall

MaryAnn Johanson @ FlickFilosopher.com

  • Excerpt: An incredibly inspiring story about two young women who come back from dehumanizing experiences to advocate for change. A film of great grace, dignity, beauty, and power.

Exit Plan

Jared Mobarak @ The Film Stage

  • Excerpt: The whole shifts gears [to] become more about the hotel than the man we’ve invested in. You can’t just make the MacGuffin important at the eleventh hour and expect us to care.

Extro

Laura Clifford @ Reeling Reviews

  • Excerpt: an affectionate and amusing send-up of the Japanese film industry …a sweet and funny homage to the big dreamers whose importance to the film industry is often overlooked.

The F***-It List

João Pinto @ Portal Cinema [Portuguese]

Faith Based

Mike McGranaghan @ The Aisle Seat

  • Excerpt: Simply mocking stuff like God’s Not Dead would be shooting fish in a barrel. Instead, the film goes for something deeper and more poignant.

A Fall from Grace

Candice Frederick @ New York Times

Family Romance, LLC

Laura Clifford @ Reeling Reviews

  • Excerpt: It becomes clear that while some of Family Romance’s fakery and lies are harmless, those which deceive the recipient or are delivered to clients who get lost in illusions result in serious ethical and moral concerns.

MaryAnn Johanson @ FlickFilosopher.com

  • Excerpt: A marvelously strange and perplexing meta meditation on human connection and ritual, on fact and fiction, on emotional truth. An existential cinematic rabbit hole as only Werner Herzog can deliver.

The Family Tree

James Wegg @ JWR

  • Excerpt: Different kinds of love

Fantasy Island

Frank Ochieng @ Flick Feast

  • Excerpt: What’s next? Perhaps Love Boat with sea-sick passengers? How about Hotel with extra pushy guests? Or maybe Finders of Lost Loves with alarming divorce rates? [A] whimsical waste of a pointless reboot.

Fatal Affair

Betty Jo Tucker @ ReelTalk Movie Reviews

  • Excerpt: Though repetition dampens the chills, FATAL AFFAIR boasts a few thrills. Too many cuts to ocean waves., yet acting almost this film saves.

Fatima

Mike McGranaghan @ The Aisle Seat

  • Excerpt: Full of compelling ideas about the mystery of faith.

Dennis Schwartz @ Dennis Schwartz Reviews

  • Excerpt: The reverential film will not change the minds of either believers or doubters.

Feels Good Man

Jared Mobarak @ JaredMobarak.com

  • Excerpt: This is a densely packed film that both entertains via Furie’s empathetic quest to redeem his creation and educates with a very necessary lesson in meme culture and online behavior.

Josh Taylor @ www.forgetfulfilmcritic.com

  • Excerpt: First time director Arthur Jones covers a lot of ground in Feels Good Man. His film is an engrossing look at the power of the internet to shape the world that lies beyond the screen.

The Fight

Laura Clifford @ Reeling Reviews

  • Excerpt: …it is almost traumatic to be reminded of just how long and how often we have been battered with assaults upon justice and equal rights. Yet overall, the documentary slants toward hope.

Mike McGranaghan @ The Aisle Seat

  • Excerpt: Don’t miss one of 2020’s most indispensable documentaries.

Jared Mobarak @ The Film Stage

  • Excerpt: Does the decision to sprinkle those tough debates into a much friendlier profile that targets an audience already on the ACLU’s side make the end result a “puff piece”? No.

Film About a Father Who

Jared Mobarak @ The Film Stage

  • Excerpt: This film isn’t therefore about righting wrongs, but exposing facts Ira kept locked away. Lynne Sachs captures it with immense compassion.

Fisherman’s Friends

Laura Clifford @ Reeling Reviews

  • Excerpt: Writers…employ the much-used “Local Hero” template for their fictionalized true story and yet director Chris Foggin, blessed with a strong cast, keeps the twee at bay with genuine good heart and strong characterizations.

Herman Dhaliwal @ Cinema Sanctum

  • Excerpt: Despite its faults, I was ultimately very charmed by the film. The sheer likability of the cast and lovely music makes the most out of a familiar formula.

Jared Mobarak @ The Film Stage

  • Excerpt: [The cast has] willingly embraced the clichés to honor a story brimming with the kind of hope we need currently and it’s worth following their lead.

The Flood

James Wegg @ JWR

  • Excerpt: One of the most telling lines of the production comes from Haile’s lips: “I’ve always been unwanted.”

Followed

Laura Clifford @ Reeling Reviews

  • Excerpt: …like “Paranormal Activity” crossed with Ty West’s “Innkeepers” with writer Todd Klick adding a psychological twist… This one’s claim of having been based on true events is also more valid than most.

C.H. Newell @ Father Son Holy Gore

  • Excerpt: An unlikeable protagonist and messy story take away from a film that otherwise has compelling things to say about true crime entertainment and social media influencers.

Forbidden Fruit: The Golden Age of the Exploitation Film vols 1-3

Sarah Boslaugh @ TheArtsSTL

  • Excerpt: Given the very real problems that we’re facing today, it’s positively comforting to visit a world where, it seems, people had to work overtime to invent things to be upset about.

Force of Nature

Nell Minow @ rogerebert.com

  • Excerpt: Even a script written by algorithm would make more sense than “Force of Nature,” a dumb dud of a movie that relies on the most preposterous of coincidences and the most exhausted of premises (in both senses of the word).

Fried Barry

Brent McKnight @ The Last Thing I See

  • Excerpt: In the end, I’m not entirely sure what to make of South African oddity Fried Barry. Leaping boundaries of horror, science fiction, and gritty realism, among others, it’s certainly a wild, chaotic, immersive ride.

Game of Death

Eddie Pasa @ DC Filmdom

  • Excerpt: The COVID-19 pandemic has allowed some lesser-known, low-budget films to step into the spotlight. Game of Death should have *stayed* lesser-known.

The Garden Left Behind

Rich Cline @ Shadows on the Wall

  • Excerpt: Intimate and skilfully observed, this low-key drama has a vivid emotional undercurrent right from the start as it follows a young woman who has to argue about why she wants to be herself, fight for her right to live in peace and face a major physical and emotional transition.

Get Duked!

Brent McKnight @ The Last Thing I See

  • Excerpt: It’s a shame most people won’t have the opportunity to watch this with a crowd. It’s the kind of raucous, unruly comedy that would slay with a rowdy late-night audience.

Jared Mobarak @ The Film Stage

  • Excerpt: Doff may have thrown in a kitchen sink of clichés, but he knows exactly how to marry them together. The result is an endearingly uproarious affair.

Ghost Stories

Kathy Gibson @ Access Bollywood

Ghost Tropic

Laura Clifford @ Reeling Reviews

  • Excerpt: This beautiful film from coeditor/writer/director Bas Devos is a paean to a city under cover of night and the little seen people who populate it.

Ghosts of War

Jared Mobarak @ The Film Stage

  • Excerpt: While [the supernatural] does effectively give meaning to what occurs, it also undermines the potency of knowing the grief these soldiers experience comes from within.

Go Back to China

Frederic and Mary Ann Brussat @ Spirituality & Practice

  • Excerpt: An entertaining story about a rich girl discovering that family matters.

The Go-Go’s

Mike McGranaghan @ The Aisle Seat

  • Excerpt: One of the best rock docs of recent years. A distinct attempt is made to cinematically capture the vibe that made the group so beloved.

Goldie

Andrew Wyatt @ The Lens

A Good Woman Is Hard to Find

Laura Clifford @ Reeling Reviews

  • Excerpt: …a terrifically entertaining genre film laced with witty black humor and featuring an uncommonly good performance in a role demanding much of its lead Sarah Bolger.

Ron Wilkinson @ itsjustmovies.com

  • Excerpt: A routine revenge flick packs a bigger message along with the grisly action.

Gordon Lightfoot: If You Could Read My Mind

Laura Clifford @ Reeling Reviews

  • Excerpt: Editor Alex Shuper seamlessly cuts together vintage and contemporary performances of the same song, a device that showcases just how good Lightfoot still is at eighty.

The Grand Grandmaster

Richard Gray @ The Reel Bits

  • Excerpt: A mild parody of martial arts master epics is all over the place tonally, but its charismatic cast and some broad comedy is designed to appeal to a wide audience.

The Grizzlies

Frederic and Mary Ann Brussat @ SpiritualityandPractice.com

  • Excerpt: Inspiring true story of an Inuit lacrosse team who transform themselves and their community.

The Grudge

Herman Dhaliwal @ Cinema Sanctum

  • Excerpt: Nicolas Pesce has crafted a deeply unpleasant experience, but that largely works to the film’s advantage, as long as you’re willing to ride the film’s bleak wavelength..

Mike McGranaghan @ The Aisle Seat

  • Excerpt: The Grudge is an excellent reminder that the worst sin a horror movie can commit is to be boring.

Eddie Pasa @ DC Filmdom

Guest of Honour

Andrew Wyatt @ The Lens

Guilty

Betty Jo Tucker @ ReelTalk Movie Reviews

  • Excerpt: GUILTY reminds us how important it is to listen when sexual assault charges are made instead of automatically blaming and/or shaming the accuser.

Gunjan Saxena: The Kargil Girl

Kathy Gibson @ Access Bollywood

Guns Akimbo

Sarah Gopaul @ Digital Journal

  • Excerpt: Restricted to 95 minutes, the film doesn’t try to do more than the bizarre premise promises, which is an off-the-wall shoot ‘em up featuring a reluctant and ill-qualified hero.

Simon Miraudo @ Student Edge

  • Excerpt: It takes a flick like Guns Akimbo to make you stop and appreciate the craftsmanship and nuance of a motion picture like Crank.

Gutterbug

Federico Furzan @ Cinelipsis

  • Excerpt: Bug is a homeless junkie whose life has no meaning, until he meets a girl the day of his 21st birthday when he also decides to find his way home.

H Is for Happiness

MaryAnn Johanson @ FlickFilosopher.com

  • Excerpt: Offbeat portrait of an unconventional girl is all over the place, sometimes detouring into the cringeworthy, as it tries to depict the emotional familial confusion its tween protagonist is navigating.

Karl Delossantos @ Smash Cut Reviews

  • Excerpt: The Half of it is a melancholy, but an ultimately joyful, exploration of growing up and exploring your identity told through a thoughtful, meditative, and heartwarming story.

Herman Dhaliwal @ Cinema Sanctum

  • Excerpt: I was charmed by the characters, found myself invested in their quiet and internal journeys of self-discovery. Alice Wu’s filmmaking here is confident, warm, and totally in tune with the feelings of the characters and their sense of longing.

Dennis Schwartz @ Dennis Schwartz Reviews

  • Excerpt: Well-conceived and superbly written quirky coming-of-age story.

Hamilton

Laura Clifford @ Reeling Reviews

  • Excerpt: You’d be hard pressed to find a better way to enjoy the July 4th holiday.

Mark Hobin @ Fast Film Reviews

  • Excerpt: Rarely has a filmed stage play ever felt so immediate, vibrant, and vital.

Mike McGranaghan @ The Aisle Seat

  • Excerpt: An immersive experience that made me feel like I was sitting on the stage, with everything unfolding around me.

Eddie Pasa @ DC Filmdom

  • Excerpt: Almost exactly five years after its Broadway premiere, this sparkling, energetic, every-bit-worth-the-wait film has been given to the public on the Disney+ platform.

Hammer

Jared Mobarak @ The Film Stage

  • Excerpt: At only 82-minutes, Hammer contains very little that isn’t meticulously drawn by Sparkes as relevant to the whole—[most] occurring on the edge between rage and forgiveness.

Andrew Wyatt @ The Lens

Happy Happy Joy Joy

Kyle Anderson @ Nerdist

Happy Happy Joy Joy: The Ren & Stimpy Story

Laura Clifford @ Reeling Reviews

  • Excerpt: https://www.reelingreviews.com/reviews/happy-happy-joy-joy-the-…a whiplash of a documentary, celebratory and damning in its fascinating history of an animation you will be amazed ever made it into children’s programming.ren-stimpy-story/

Happy Happy Joy Joy: The Story of Ren & Stimpy

Mike McGranaghan @ The Aisle Seat

  • Excerpt: Happy Happy Joy Joy really delves into the good, the bad, and the ugly of what it takes to create a show that breaks all the rules.

Har Kisse Ke Hisse: Kaamyaab

Herman Dhaliwal @ Cinema Sanctum

  • Excerpt: Kaamyaab has its fair share of flaws, but what brings it together is Sanjay Mishra’s performance. He brings a great sense of history, subtlety, and warmth to his performance that makes the film’s lighthearted and occasionally broad approach resonate.

Have a Good Trip: Adventures in Psychedelics

Josh Taylor @ www.forgetfulfilmcritic.com

  • Excerpt: To use the parlance of someone you might score psychedelic mushrooms from at a Grateful Dead tribute band concert: Don’t let any negative vibes near your aura while you watch it, man, or you’ll, like, be in for a real bad time.

Here We Are: Notes for Living on Planet Earth

Frederic and Mary Ann Brussat @ SpiritualityandPractice.com

  • Excerpt: A wonder-filled animated film about the enchantments of the natural world seen through the eyes of a young boy.

Homewrecker

Eddie Pasa @ DC Filmdom

  • Excerpt: There is no question: Homewrecker is the most uncomfortable movie you’ll ever see.

Hong Kong Moments

Richard Gray @ The Reel Bits

  • Excerpt: Writer and documentarian Zhou Bing follows seven Hongkongers in this timely and important snapshot of a critical moment in the history of Hong Kong.

Hope Gap

James Jay Edwards @ The Big Smoke America
Jared Mobarak @ The Film Stage

  • Excerpt: Hope Gap excels in these personal revelations that hinge upon the actors’ performances and the sorrow of pain endured complemented by the recognition of pain wrought.

Horror Noire

Glenn Dunks @ The Film Experience

  • Excerpt: How great it is then to see two new documentaries Scream, Queen! My Nightmare on Elm Street and Horror Noire: A History of Black Horror focusing on these elements and offering glimpses into the complicated realm of what it is like to be a viewer and a creator in these spaces…

Horse Girl

Herman Dhaliwal @ Cinema Sanctum

  • Excerpt: there is a lot to admire. It’s well made, and Brie does a wonderful job in bringing her character to life, but the film loses focus as it goes along.

Gregory J. Smalley @ 366 Weird Movies

  • Excerpt: …clearly a passion project for [Brie]… This makes it all the more tragic that, despite her fervent portrayal, the story isn’t as gripping as it might have been.

Host

Emmanuel Báez @ Cinéfiloz [Spanish]
Herman Dhaliwal @ Cinema Sanctum

  • Excerpt: It might not age gracefully, but that doesn’t mean it won’t hold up as an entertaining curiosity. Moving as fast as it does, it is easy to get sucked up in all the chaos, keeping you engaged in the narrative, even when it dabbles into familiar territory.

James Jay Edwards @ The Big Smoke America
C.H. Newell @ Father Son Holy Gore

  • Excerpt: Host is a lean, mean digital Gothic chiller best watched with the lights on.

House of Hummingbird

Mary Ann and Frederic Brussat @ Spirituality & Practice

  • Excerpt: A coming-of-age story filled with small moments of spiritual wisdom, including a practice for times of sadness.

Herman Dhaliwal @ Cinema Sanctum

  • Excerpt: Bora Kim tackles familiar ideas in a way that is incredibly empathetic, warm, and tender. A deeply moving portrayal a girl’s loneliness and longing for something better at a moment of significant change.

Andrew Wyatt @ The Lens

Human Capital

Frederic and Mary Ann Brussat @ Spirituality & Practice

  • Excerpt: A morality play about economic inequality.

Ronald wilkinson @ itsjustmovies.com

  • Excerpt: At times too complicated for its own good, the screenplay juggles stories and perspectives as superb performances carry the day.

Human Nature

Sarah Boslaugh @ TheArtsSTL

  • Excerpt: In a time when scientific expertise is regularly denigrated (witness the bungled American response to the COVID-19 outbreak, and the disrespect meted out to people who actually know what they’re talking about in this regard), Human Nature explains why the work of science is important, and how our lives are better for it.

Brent McKnight @ The Last Thing I See

  • Excerpt: What is CRISPR? It’s a revolutionary new development in genetic manipulation, one that has epic, sprawling, far-reaching implications across numerous fields, and it just might terrify you..

Bev Questad @ It’s Just Movies

  • Excerpt: The magic was here all along, and now, more than ever, it is ready to be used to eradicate congenital disorders, save coral reefs and possibly even help adaptation to climate change.

Josh Taylor @ www.forgetfulfilmcritic.com

  • Excerpt: Human Nature is a thought-provoking film that is by turns wondrous and terrifying. It’s a sobering look at both the promise and the peril we face as we enter an age of being able to alter who we are on a genetic level.

I Am Human

Frederic and Mary Ann Brussat @ Spirituality & Practice

  • Excerpt: An engaging and thought-provoking documentary about cutting-edge brain science.

I Am Woman

Rich Cline @ Shadows on the Wall

  • Excerpt: Energetic and engaging, this biopic about singer Helen Reddy carefully highlights the larger issues that drove her career and inspired her bigger hits, even as it sidelines major elements of her life

Mike McGranaghan @ The Aisle Seat

  • Excerpt: A reasonably entertaining film for people who remember Helen Reddy and the way her signature song inspired millions of American woman in their fight for equality.

I Still Believe

Dan Lybarger @ Arkansas Democrat-Gazette

  • Excerpt: If you find Nicholas Sparks’ work too subtle and intellectually engaging, you might appreciate this film.

Immigration Nation

Dennis Schwartz @ Dennis Schwartz Reviews

  • Excerpt: In this relevant film, we have the rare opportunity of being witnesses to history.

Impetigore

Jared Mobarak @ The Film Stage

  • Excerpt: To say [too much] would ruin some of the surprises that Anwar has in store since duplicity runs very deep throughout the mythology he has created.

Impractical Jokers: The Movie

Frank Ochieng @ Flick Feast

  • Excerpt: Ultimately, this cruel impractical joke is on all of us…is about as amusing as sitting on a whoppie cushion filled with chocolate filling.

Infamous

Herman Dhaliwal @ Cinema Sanctum

  • Excerpt: The film is made with style, and Bella Thorne is a compelling lead, but the story is far too hollow and formulaic.

Inherit the Viper

Herman Dhaliwal @ Cinema Sanctum

  • Excerpt: While the film might not say a whole lot about the opioid crisis, the performances and strong direction keeps the story engaging and the suspense exciting.

Inheritance

Laura Clifford @ Reeling Reviews

  • Excerpt: The equivalent of a cheesy airport thriller, “Inheritance” gives Simon Pegg an opportunity to play outside his usual lines, but neophyte Matthew Kennedy’s script serves red herrings and abandoned trails as it sets us up for a big reveal that skids seriously off the rails.

MaryAnn Johanson @ FlickFilosopher.com

  • Excerpt: Nothing works in this ludicrous thriller, which fails to compel us with its roster of monstrous characters. Lily Collins is woefully miscast; Patrick Warburton and Simon Pegg are criminally wasted.

Jared Mobarak @ The Film Stage

  • Excerpt: Inheritance might have benefited from its third act being a tad subtler, but I get the allure of throwing away nuance for splashy suspense.

Eddie Pasa @ DC Filmdom

Inmate #1: The Rise of Danny Trejo

Laura Clifford @ Reeling Reviews

  • Excerpt: The smartest thing cowriter/director Brett Harvey is largely give the narrative reins of his documentary over to its charismatic subject… If you love the man as an actor, you’ll love him even more as himself.

Jared Mobarak @ JaredMobarak.com

  • Excerpt: Whether or not Trejo has actually paid his debt to society for the ills of his youth isn’t for us to judge anyway. All we can know is that he’s never stopped making amends.

Ironbark

Kyle Anderson @ Nerdist

J’Accuse

Paulo Portugal @ Insider [Portuguese]

James vs. His Future Self

Eddie Pasa @ DC Filmdom

Jawaani Jaaneman

Tusshar Sasi @ Filmy Sasi

  • Excerpt: This Nitin Kakkar film creates a new universe for fun Bollywood cinema centred on parenting headlined by one of 2000s’ most charming romantic stars. Welcome back Saif Ali Khan & cheers to the charming debutante, Alaya F.

The Jesus Rolls

Sarah Gopaul @ Digital Journal

  • Excerpt: The narrative is built on dialogue as characters with different backgrounds collide in this crazy adventure of sex and crime.

Jezebel

Herman Dhaliwal @ Cinema Sanctum

  • Excerpt: Aside from moments that could’ve been expanded upon, I was very fond of what Numa Perrier did with Jezebel. It’s an achingly human film that shines a light on the kinds of experiences films don’t often cover, and it does it in a way that is raw, honest, and surprisingly hopeful.

Joan of Arc

Laura Clifford @ Reeling Reviews

  • Excerpt: Both sections of the film have a unique tone, the young Joan of Arc of serious and spiritual intent, those who debate her frequently appearing as if they’ve wandered in from a Monty Python film.

Beverly Questad @ It’s Just Movies

  • Excerpt: Basically, “Joan of Arc” is an unusual presentation. It’s as if Dumont has deliberately broken every rule of good story-telling in cinema.

Andrew Wyatt @ The Lens

John Henry

Laura Clifford @ Reeling Reviews

  • Excerpt: While the film’s narrative is shaky at best, Forbes exhibits quite a bit of style with an obviously low budget, making him a filmmaker to watch.

Frank Ochieng @ Flick Feast

  • Excerpt: [a] half-baked, hedonistic inner city revenge thriller…registers with all the generic luster of a rusty sledgehammer. John Henry is hammered but not the preferred way you would expect

Judy & Punch

Jared Mobarak @ JaredMobarak.com

  • Excerpt: Judy & Punch succeeds in large part because of how it mixes [farcical comedy and poignant social commentary] together to increase the potency of their respective impact.

James Wegg @ JWR

  • Excerpt: “That’s the way to do it”

Jurassic Thunder

Bradley Gibson @ Film Threat

  • Excerpt: The promotional description of Jurassic Thunder makes it sound like a standard low budget B movie. I’m here to tell you, oh my brothers and sisters, that paltry collection of soft words doesn’t get close to doing justice to the stratospheric heights of ridiculousness in this film where the madness begins with badly animated T-Rex’s with frickin’ machine guns strapped to their frickin’ heads.

Kajillionaire

Laura Clifford @ Reeling Reviews

  • Excerpt: Watch as [Evan Rachel Wood] walks behind Jenkins and Winger like an Emirati wife, head down but fingers flying towards any pay phone coin return that crosses her path, her entire body language like a magician’s misdirection.

Charlie Juhl @ Citizen Charlie

  • Excerpt: Miranda July makes her most accessible film yet about the most inaccessible of characters

Mike McGranaghan @ The Aisle Seat

  • Excerpt: The movie makes you laugh and breaks your heart at the same time.

Matt Oakes @

  • Excerpt: Miranda July’s oddball opus ‘Kajillionaire’ uses quirk to speak to the distancing of humanity from itself, creating a weirdly tender and wholly otherworldly dramedy that’s lit up by great performances.

Kate Nash: Underestimate the Girl

Jared Mobarak @ JaredMobarak.com

  • Excerpt: These are Nash’s anthems to the underestimated and this journey is proof that evolution through reinvention only makes you stronger.

Killed My Wife

James Jay Edwards @ The Big Smoke America
Eddie Pasa @ DC Filmdom

The Killing of Two Lovers

Richard Gray @ The Reel Bits

  • Excerpt: An intimate and often tense portrait of a family in trouble.

Lake Michigan Monster

Jared Mobarak @ JaredMobarak.com

  • Excerpt: The film itself is the joke: a great-looking labor of love that chooses silliness and puerility over austere seriousness. If nothing else, you have to admire its conviction.

Lake of Death

James Jay Edwards @ The Big Smoke America

Last Call

Andrea Chase @ KillerMovieReviews.com

  • Excerpt: A quietly wrenching precis on loneliness and the need to connect in the 21st-century

Jared Mobarak @ JaredMobarak.com

  • Excerpt: Where one-take dramas often lose their propulsive drive, this is a tight 77-minutes composed of a continuous fight or flight adrenaline rush whether dialogue is spoken or not.

The Last Full Measure

Jared Mobarak @ The Film Stage

  • Excerpt: [While] some of its melodrama [proves] disingenuous, it remains effective and affecting. There are some truly profound moments of authenticity that hit harder than [expected].

The Last Thing He Wanted

Joao Pinto @ Portal Cinema [Portuguese]

  • Excerpt: Terrible…What a miss oportunity!

Rene Sanchez @ Cine Sin Fronteras [Spanish]

The Last Tree

Mary Ann and Frederic Brussat @ Spirituality & Practice

  • Excerpt: A compelling coming-of-age drama about a Nigerian immigrant in London.

MaryAnn Johanson @ FlickFilosopher.com

  • Excerpt: An astonishingly beautiful coming-of-age story of startling specificity and intense intimacy, yet universal in its compassionate depiction of a child’s perspective dawning on mature self-awareness.

Latte & the Magic Waterstone

Betty Jo Tucker @ ReelTalk Movie Reviews

  • Excerpt: Unlike so many animated films, this one makes no effort to appeal to grown-ups. And that was just fine for my inner six-year-old.

Like a Boss

Candice Frederick @ The Wrap
Courtney Howard @ FreshFiction.tv

  • Excerpt: Despite its sweet sentiments about female friendship, its connect-the-dots formula, mixed messages and stale characters and conflicts overwhelm, making this a messterpiece.

MaryAnn Johanson @ FlickFilosopher.com

  • Excerpt: This instantly forgettable fluff lazily relies on too many unfunny slapstick and grossout tangents. But real humor blossoms in the terrific performances and in a fast, funny, and surprising feminism.

Frank Ochieng @ Flick Feast

  • Excerpt: [A] flat and flimsy premise deserving of an immediate pink slip. The monotonous Like a Boss drags out its cockeyed comedic conflict with all the originality and imagination of cherry-colored lip gloss.

Little America

Frederic and Mary Ann Brussat @ Spirituality & Practice

  • Excerpt: A joyous collection of portraits of immigrant experiences inspired by true stories.

Live from the Space Stage: A Halyx Story

James Jay Edwards @ The Big Smoke America

La Llorona

Herman Dhaliwal @ Cinema Sanctum

  • Excerpt: Strong performances and a haunting atmosphere work in sync with Jayro Bustamante’s efforts in modernizing the folklore. It might not satisfy every horror fan because of its restrained nature, but it has a lot to say.

Lonely Encounter

Bavner Donaldo @ Cinejour [Indonesian]

Look at Me

João Pinto @ Portal Cinema [Portuguese and English]

  • Excerpt: It recently premiered at Tribeca (online) and it was one of the most interesting shorts on the program!

Lost Girls

Herman Dhaliwal @ Cinema Sanctum

  • Excerpt: There’s a lot of care placed in the way the film approaches the way we talk about cases like this, and the way they are often dismissed and ignored, and by the end of it, you can’t help but feel just as frustrated as our characters.

MaryAnn Johanson @ FlickFilosopher.com

  • Excerpt: Based-on-fact drama puts the focus where it rarely is onscreen: on women who are victims of male violence. Yet a terrific central performance and an abundance of empathy cannot overcome its clichés.

Joao Pinto @ Portal Cinema [Portuguese]

  • Excerpt: Amy Ryan showcases her talent in a film that will make you want to know more about the Long Island serial killer.

Betty Jo Tucker @ ReelTalk Movie Reviews

  • Excerpt: “Lost Girls,” a dark and true movie – as scary as a film can be. But this story should’ve been told as documentary, pure gold.

Lost in America

Candice Frederick @ The Wrap

Love Aaj Kal

Tusshar Sasi @ Filmy Sasi

  • Excerpt: Love Aaj Kal’ is a profound signal that the Imtiaz Ali brand of cinema ought to evolve. Because there is very little to feel in a banal love story made worse by lead actors who barely know their craft.

Love Guaranteed

Rich Cline @ Shadows on the Wall

  • Excerpt: The beautiful cast and settings, plus the easy mechanics of the genre, make it irresistibly charming, even when it takes a shameless trip into gloopy sentimentality

Love Wedding Repeat

João Pinto @ Portal Cinema [Portuguese and English]

The Lovebirds

Mark Hobin @ Fast Film Reviews

  • Excerpt: There aren’t enough laughs to justify sitting through this 87-minute movie. I know, that seems short….but it feels long.

MaryAnn Johanson @ FlickFilosopher.com

  • Excerpt: The hugely appealing Issa Rae and Kumail Nanjiani share terrific comic and romantic chemistry and work their everywoman and -man charm to the max. Go-to goofy escapism for, say, a pandemic lockdown.

Joao Pinto @ Portal Cinema [Portuguese]
Betty Jo Tucker @ ReelTalk Movie Reviews

  • Excerpt: Surprisingly, this movie’s romance angle ends up being just icing on a very tasty cake. It’s funny, suspenseful and a joy to watch.

Lucky Grandma

Herman Dhaliwal @ Cinema Sanctum

  • Excerpt: A relatively standard formula is used to add details in character and environment that ring true of underrepresented experiences, and it does so with a sly sense of humor. It’s a promising directorial debut from Sasie Sealy that gives Tsai Chin an opportunity to really shine.

MaryAnn Johanson @ FlickFilosopher.com

  • Excerpt: Wild sass, gentle comedy, shivs of poignancy, and instantly vivid characters add up to a wonderful riff on mob movies as a Chinatown granny faces off against gangsters. Tsai Chin is an absolute hoot.

Charlie Juhl @ Citizen Charlie

  • Excerpt: Presenting itself as oddball and left field, Lucky Grandma is not as wry as it thinks it is. Boilerplate plot and the laborious way it unfolds offsets the authentic Chinatown setting leaving the audience with only indifference by the end.

Eddie Pasa @ DC Filmdom

Made in Italy

Mark Hobin @ Fast Film Reviews

  • Excerpt: I enjoyed the landscapes.

Malang

Tusshar Sasi @ Filmy Sasi

  • Excerpt: It feels like an extended music album visualized through Vikas Sivaraman’s indulgent lenses. Problems arise when ‘Malang’ tries to be a feature film as there is only so much one can do with a dull screenplay & lifeless characters.

Malasana 32

Joao Pinto @ Portal Cinema [Portuguese]

The Man Standing Next

Richard Gray @ The Reel Bits

  • Excerpt: A slickly produced snapshot of a moment in time that remains divisive to this day. An excellent cast and beautiful photography lift this above the average bear.

The Man Who Was Sherlock Holmes

Sarah Boslaugh @ TheArtsSTL

  • Excerpt: The screenplay by Robert A Stemmie and Karl Hartl both plays the game—assumes Holmes and Watson are real persons living in the real world, or at least sets the story in a world where the characters believe that—and acknowledges that they are fictional creations.

Marona’s Fantastic Tale

Laura Clifford @ Reeling Reviews

  • Excerpt: the animators bring her into existence with a lap of her mother’s tongue, using it like a paintbrush… This beautiful story is animated with uniquely surreal visuals

Measure for Measure

Rich Cline @ Shadows on the Wall

  • Excerpt: Shakespeare’s dialog and plot have been reimagined, which is a bit gimmicky. But the film is packed with snappy wordplay, sharp attitudes and dark currents of emotion

Military Wives

MaryAnn Johanson @ FlickFilosopher.com

  • Excerpt: So aggressively precisely what you think it is that there’s almost no point in seeing it. Flattens a true story into generic pap that isn’t even that successfully, authentically feel-good, either.

Jared Mobarak @ The Film Stage

  • Excerpt: Thomas and Horgan beautifully ensure that this story remains about grief’s many forms: past, present, and potential. Success is no match for catharsis.

Miracle in Cell Nº 7

João Pinto @ Portal Cinema [Portuguese and English]

Miracle in Cell No. 7

Mark Hobin @ Fast Film Reviews

  • Excerpt: A heretofore unknown subtitled movie from Turkey became a Top 10 hit on Netflix. Will wonders never cease?

Misbehaviour

Rich Cline @ Shadows on the Wall

  • Excerpt: With vivid characters and pointed situations, the film keeps the audience entertained while reminding us that the battle for equality is still being fought

Mark Hobin @ Fast Film Reviews

  • Excerpt: Is this a celebration or denunciation of beauty pageants? I’m confused but I do know that actress Gugu Mbatha-Raw is an absolute delight.

Les Miserables

Simon Miraudo @ Student Edge

  • Excerpt: With vision of riots fuelled by racist police forces and shootings of unarmed Black citizens among 2020’s most prominent images, Les Misérables is as timely as it is depressingly timeless.

The Mojo Manifesto: The Life and Times of Mojo Nixon

Bradley Gibson @ Film Threat

  • Excerpt: Freedom Records & Films’ documentary about Mojo Nixon started production in 2012, and, at the time, it was scheduled to release a couple of years later. There’s no indication why it took so long, but the fruit of director Matt Eskey’s labors, The Mojo Manifesto: The Life and Times of Mojo Nixon, is well worth the long wait.

The Mole Agent

Laura Clifford @ Reeling Reviews

  • Excerpt: [Alberdi’s] biggest boon is Sergio, the newly widowed man Romulo hires, whose kindness and attractive gentlemanly appearance makes him a big hit with the predominantly female residents of San Francisco.

Monsoon

Rich Cline @ Shadows on the Wall

  • Excerpt: Director Hong Khaou continues on from the delicate beauty of Lilting with this gentle, finely crafted exploration of personal history and identity

Mope

Herman Dhaliwal @ Cinema Sanctum

  • Excerpt: As a film, it’s solid, but full of frustrations and missed opportunities, but as a debut, I think it shows promise for Heyne as a filmmaker, and our two leads put in good work.

Mosquito

Paulo Portugal @ [Portuguese]

Mr. Jones

Herman Dhaliwal @ Cinema Sanctum

  • Excerpt: Despite a compelling narrative and absorbing period details and setting, the film is too rushed to make the necessary impact.

Jared Mobarak @ JaredMobarak.com

  • Excerpt: Rather than merely seek to expose its titular character as a selfless hero, the film also looks to make visible the strings pulled by opportunists we thought we could trust.

Betty Jo Tucker @ ReelTalk Movie Reviews

  • Excerpt: MR. JONES may be hard to see, but check out this smart history. Challenging film? Oh yes indeed — probably one we need to heed.

Mrs. Serial Killer

Betty Jo Tucker @ ReelTalk Movie Reviews

  • Excerpt: Despite this thriller’s serious theme and downer images, I enjoyed its clever camera tricks, and the parody attitude of certain scenes appealed to me.

Murder Death Koreatown

Gregory J. Smalley @ 366 Weird Movies

  • Excerpt: Your enjoyment of ‘Murder Death Koreatown’ will be linked to your tolerance for watching feature-length shot-on-cellphone vlogs…If you’re willing to overlook the budgetary issues, however, ‘Murder Death Koreatown’ is a solid watch—and if you rate it on a dollars spent to entertainment value curve, it’s off the chart.

My Darling Vivian

Bradley Gibson @ Film Threat

  • Excerpt: In 1951 Johnny Cash met Vivian Liberto at a skating rink in San Antonio when she was a Catholic schoolgirl, and he was an airman in the U.S. Air Force. He was immediately besotted with her, and after he shipped out to Germany, they exchanged thousands of love letters. When he returned in 1954, they were married, and shortly after that, she was pregnant with the first of four daughters.

My Little Sister

Alan Mattli @ Maximum Cinema [German]

  • Excerpt: My Little Sister is a solid enough drama, but it feels like a French or German arthouse film from 2011, illustrating just how out of step Swiss cinema is with the rest of the world.

My Spy

MaryAnn Johanson @ FlickFilosopher.com

  • Excerpt: A “family” comedy about nuclear terrorism, the incompetent CIA agent on the case, and his 9-year-old sidekick. Desperately unfunny, thoroughly misjudged. We are in the worst and the dumbest timeline.

Charlie Juhl @ Citizen Charlie

  • Excerpt: Fires and misses to be this generation’s Kindergarten Cop. My Spy will neither torture parents nor become their kid’s new favorite movie, but it will distract everyone long enough to not make it seem like a waste of time.

Mike McGranaghan @

  • Excerpt: My Spy is little more than a compendium of lazy “tough guy is softened up by a cute kid” cliches that’s too violent for young children, and too childish for fans of action movies.

Aaron Neuwirth @ We Live Entertainment

  • Excerpt: Even in a trite film such as this, Bautista’s comic timing proves to be worthwhile to some degree.

Natalie Wood: What Remains Behind

Herman Dhaliwal @ Cinema Sanctum

  • Excerpt: For those already familiar with her life and work, there isn’t much new to this. However, the doc makes the case that she leaves a strong body of work behind that will stand the test of time that better defines her legacy than her tragic, untimely death.

Beverly Questad @ It’s Just Movies

  • Excerpt: Myths are busted, secrets are told, romances are accounted for, and friends testify about her values and character. How each of her three children remembers her is revealed.

The Nest

Laura Clifford @ Reeling Reviews

  • Excerpt: Nine longs years after his 2011 debut “Martha Marcy May Marlene” writer/director Sean Durkin returns with another unsettling film whose surface belies what lies beneath.

Matt Oakes @

  • Excerpt: This well-acted follow-up feature from Sean Durkin is a ruminant deconstruction of ambition at the cost of a family’s emotional well-being. ‘The Nest’s measured pace and subtle themes may leave some viewers wondering at its meaning but those willing to emotionally engage with Durkin’s work may find themselves helplessly dwelling on exactly that.

Dennis Schwartz @ Dennis Schwartz Reviews

  • Excerpt: A curious and disturbing family drama.

The New Mutants

Rich Cline @ Shadows on the Wall

  • Excerpt: There’s a clever idea here, combining teen-angst drama with horror on the fringe of the X-Men universe. But the film is relentlessly superficial, never dipping beneath the surface of its pungent issues

Matt Oakes @

  • Excerpt: ‘The New Mutants’ is a classic case of wasted potential, Josh Boone’s vision of a darker horror-genre superhero movie not fulfilled so much as it is merely suggested. The cast and special effects are serviceable (if muddy at times) but the whole thing feels small and ultimately pointless rather than just self-contained. RIP X-Men.

The Night House

Kyle Anderson @ Nerdist

No Small Matter

Mary Ann and Frederic Brussat @ Spirituality & Practice

  • Excerpt: An eye-opening documentary about the great benefits of early childhood education for children and the society at large.

Bev Questad @ itsjustmovies.com

  • Excerpt: “No Small Matter” gives many strong arguments, including data from early brain studies at the University of Washington, that prove early childhood education is the most important investment America can make for a strong, stable, successful country.

Nomadland

Allyson Johnson @ TheYoungFolks.com
Jared Mobarak @ JaredMobarak.com

  • Excerpt: A family is formed by way of a philosophy. New friendships are therefore a delicate process of boundaries and understanding. Zhao doesn’t compromise that truth.

Offering to the Storm

João Pinto @ Portal Cinema [Portuguese]

An Officer and a Spy

Alan Mattli @ Facing the Bitter Truth [German]

  • Excerpt: Any semblance of thematic depth and emotional complexity is lost amid Polanski’s self-righteous, superficial self-referentiality.

Diego Salgado @ Guía del Ocio [Spanish]

Olympic Dreams

MaryAnn Johanson @ FlickFilosopher.com

  • Excerpt: Guerilla filmmaking is at its most charming in this melancholy romance set — and improvised and shot on the fly — in the 2018 Pyeongchang Olympic Village. Delightful and delicately observed.

Charlie Juhl @ Citizen Charlie

  • Excerpt: This Olympic setting does not require machine guns, hostages, and explosions – far from it – but Olympic Dreams is a case of background eclipsing plot and characters.

Mike McGranaghan @ The Aisle Seat

  • Excerpt: It’s a shame that such unprecedented access to the Olympic Village was squandered on a paper-thin story that goes nowhere and accomplishes nothing.

Jared Mobarak @ The Film Stage

  • Excerpt: Olympic Dreams [is] a heartfelt and introspective journey that delves within the human psyche caught in stasis [to remind us] that we’re more than our achievements or failures.

On the Record

Candice Frederick @ The Wrap

The One and Only Ivan

Laura Clifford @ Reeling Reviews

  • Excerpt: If Stella’s ‘Not all humans are bad. They can surprise you,’ wilts under the slavery allegory, it fits right in with the animal rights concept that “Ivan” will imprint on children.

Rich Cline @ Shadows on the Wall

  • Excerpt: Thankfully, there’s a witty edge to the dialog that keeps things from becoming too syrupy. And it also helps that effects work is grounded and realistic

Herman Dhaliwal @ Cinema Sanctum

  • Excerpt: As a parable about the harms of animal captivity, The One And Only Ivan is fairly simplistic. However, it’s easy to get sucked into the story because of its charming characters.

Mike McGranaghan @ The Aisle Seat

  • Excerpt: Disney hasn’t produced such a bizarre animal-related feature since 1995’s Operation Dumbo Drop.

One Night in Miami

Allyson Johnson @ TheYoungFolks.com

Only

Marina Antunes @ Quiet Earth

Ordinary Love

Laura Clifford @ Reeling Reviews

  • Excerpt: With screenwriter Owen McCafferty fictionalizing his own experience, directors Lisa Barros D’Sa and Glenn Leyburn (“Cherrybomb”) provide a clean, modern aesthetic to their Belfast backdrop for Lesley Manville and Liam Neeson to render “Ordinary Love” extraordinary.

MaryAnn Johanson @ FlickFilosopher.com

  • Excerpt: A Cancer Movie but not a horror story. Funny, moving, hopeful; an intimate portrait of a couple who know how to support each other and why that matters. Oh, and it’s also a love letter to the NHS.

Nell Minow @ rogerebert.com

  • Excerpt: Manville gives a performance of heartbreaking delicacy and courage.

Jared Mobarak @ JaredMobarak.com

  • Excerpt: Tremors of anger and annoyance run just below the surface [because] not even the purest love can evade humanity’s inherently [fear-driven] messiness.

The Other Lamb

Mike McGranaghan @

  • Excerpt: A smart, provocative chiller with a strong perspective.

Jared Mobarak @ JaredMobarak.com

  • Excerpt: Szumowska utilizes the beautiful, almost otherworldly environment where she’s set McMullen’s script to visualize Selah’s coming-of-age journey towards the reality of her predicament.

Ronald wilkinson @ itsjustmovies.com

  • Excerpt: If you ever thought joining a zombie cult would be fun, think again.

Andrew Wyatt @ The Lens

Out Stealing Horses

Laura Clifford @ Reeling Reviews

  • Excerpt: an affecting coming of age tale about how an affair affects two boys in different families. Unfortunately the adaptation…has excised enough of the story that the film is narratively disjointed…

Jared Mobarak @ The Film Stage

  • Excerpt: A melancholy permeates every frame of Moland’s film and can be felt with every note of Kaspar Kaae’s gorgeous score.

The Outpost

Laura Clifford @ Reeling Reviews

  • Excerpt: Director Rod Lurie (“The Contender”), a West Point graduate and veteran, pays homage to Bravo Troop 3-61, who would be outnumbered by a factor of over four to one in a position best described as ‘fish in a barrel’ in one of the worst battles of the Afghan War.

Charlie Juhl @ Citizen Charlie

  • Excerpt: The Outpost feels like a war movie classic while simultaneously employing innovative ideas. The visceral performances are unique and combined with the absurdity of COP Keating’s situation, it will leave you with a lasting impression.

Mike McGranaghan @ The Aisle Seat

  • Excerpt: The Outpost is one of the very best war movies of recent years.

Dennis Schwartz @ Dennis Schwartz Reviews

  • Excerpt: It’s a good realistic war drama if you want to see how the war in Afghanistan is going.

The Owners

Mike McGranaghan @ The Aisle Seat

  • Excerpt: A picture that keeps you guessing.

C.H. Newell @ Father Son Holy Gore

  • Excerpt: The Owners is eerie and exciting in equal measure. All the thrills and the horror compliment the story’s themes, bringing out terror based in issues of class, family, and masculinity.

Betty Jo Tucker @ ReelTalk Movie Reviews

  • Excerpt: Not for scaredy cats, no siree. Almost too frightening for me!

Pahokee

Jared Mobarak @ The Film Stage

  • Excerpt: When so many places in America are known for slashing budgets and ignoring public education, Pahokee arrives as an inspirational exception.

The Painted Bird

Laura Clifford @ Reeling Reviews

  • Excerpt: Writer/director Václav Marhoul’s faithful adaptation of Jerzy Kosinski’s controversial 1965 novel…, a book that once read is never forgotten, is a stunning achievement for those willing to navigate the opposite of escapism.

Ronald wilkinson @ ItsJustMovies.com

  • Excerpt: Vividly scripted and filmed, the horrors are all the worse for being so close to the present day.

The Painter and the Thief

Laura Clifford @ Reeling Reviews

  • Excerpt: : the enjoyment of Ree’s film lies in turning initial impressions on their head, unfolding revelations better left for the audience to discover… an unlikely tale of human connection where risk delivers many rewards.

Jared Mobarak @ The Film Stage

  • Excerpt: Their newfound friendship strips them down to their raw humanity in a way that allows them to see each other like no one has ever seen them.

The Pale Door

Laura Clifford @ Reeling Reviews

  • Excerpt: …director Aaron B. Koontz (“Camera Obscura”) would have had to devise a way to shoot flares out of the screen to engage my interest… The best thing about the film is the Edgar Allan Poe stanza which introduces it, a delusional misrepresentation of what follows.

Herman Dhaliwal @ Cinema Sanctum

  • Excerpt: It has moments that are inspired and haunting and entertaining, and the the gore effects are fantastic as well. However, it loses momentum awfully quick, and its limitations becomes very obvious.

Panga

Tusshar Sasi @ Filmy Sasi

  • Excerpt: Be it with Bhopal’s lazy vibe or the homey living spaces, Ashwiny Iyer ‘s ‘Panga’ explores middle-class Indian life with great flair. Kangana Ranaut is wonderful whereas Jassie Gill, Richa Chadha and Neena Gupta lend solid support.

Parallax

Dennis Schwartz @ Dennis Schwartz Reviews

  • Excerpt: The pacing is sluggish.

El Plan

Diego Salgado @ Guía del Ocio [Spanish]

Planet of the Humans

Frederic and Mary Ann Brussat @ SpiritualityandPractice.com

  • Excerpt: A delusion-shattering documentary on how the environmental and green energy movements have been taken over by capitalists.

MaryAnn Johanson @ FlickFilosopher.com

  • Excerpt: From the warnings of the 1950s to the 21st-century corporate takeover of green energy, a grim look at humanity’s fate as the planet heats up. Is there any hope? This feels like only half the story.

Ron Wilkinson @ itsjustmovies.com

  • Excerpt: Launched in time for Earth Day, the message is lost in the medium.

The Platform

Herman Dhaliwal @ Cinema Sanctum

  • Excerpt: It is a film that wants to make its message clear, and it will use any cinematic means necessary to get that point through. It’s full of engaging and thrilling filmmaking.

MaryAnn Johanson @ FlickFilosopher.com

  • Excerpt: This sci-fi dreadfest immerses you into a shocking mystery, punches you in the gut, then grips you with a wisdom that transcends its obviousness, daring you to deny that its open savagery is our own.

Jared Mobarak @ JaredMobarak.com

  • Excerpt: [Relies] on excellent cast willing to unearth the humor of futility while also succumbing to its depths of despair [as it coaxes] out the kinetic energy of its static spaces.

Porno

Brent McKnight @ The Last Thing I See

  • Excerpt: If you lament the lack of sex demons and genital torture in current horror cinema, have I got something for you…

Jared Mobarak @ JaredMobarak.com

  • Excerpt: Rather than be interested in dissecting its genres, it seeks to utilize those tropes to its advantage. And that’s okay.

The Postcard Killings

Herman Dhaliwal @ Cinema Sanctum

  • Excerpt: It’s a compelling enough thriller for the moment you watch it, but isn’t gonna last very long in your mind after you see it. Jeffrey Dean Morgan’s performance is what makes it all connect and work.

James Jay Edwards @ The Big Smoke America
Dennis Schwartz @ Dennis Schwartz Movie Reviews

  • Excerpt: A grizzly serial killer thriller that’s not too exciting on film even if it might have been in the book.

James Wegg @ JWR

  • Excerpt: The art in murders

Premature

Karl Delossantos @
Charlie Juhl @ Citizen Charlie

  • Excerpt: Zora Howard is hypnotic to watch in Rashaad Ernesto Green’s exploration of a first deep-dive relationship. The Harlem setting and real-world atmosphere spark Premature’s earnest tone and establishes an authenticity not usually felt in the romantic drama genre.

The Prey

Herman Dhaliwal @ Cinema Sanctum

  • Excerpt: The Prey doesn’t necessarily break a whole lot of new ground, both as an action movie and as a riff on The Most Dangerous Game. However, it’s made with skill and a great sense of building tension.

Brent McKnight @ The Last Thing I See

  • Excerpt: Worth a look for action fans and fans of people hunting other people for sport.

Eddie Pasa @ DC Filmdom

The Prince

James Wegg @

  • Excerpt: Life on the inside

Promising Young Woman

Kyle Anderson @ Nerdist

Proximity

Jared Mobarak @ The Film Stage

  • Excerpt: [The sci-fi elements] demand the time to be more than enigmatic and pretty. The script is sadly too shallow to bring everything together.

The Quarry

Herman Dhaliwal @ Cinema Sanctum

  • Excerpt: I’m not convinced it’s quite as profound as the filmmakers may have intended, but it a satisfying enough experience that was more than worth it just to see Shea Whigham give a terrific performance.

Jared Mobarak @ The Film Stage

  • Excerpt: What makes The Quarry compelling is that we know from the start that Whigham isn’t a monster. His performance is too full of heartbreak and remorse for that to be true.

Quezon’s Game

MaryAnn Johanson @ FlickFilosopher.com

  • Excerpt: An untold Holocaust story, of Philippine president Manuel Quezon’s fight to take in Jewish refugees, feels like it remains untold: this sluggish, overlong film cannot overcome its low-budget roots.

Raat Akeli Hai

Herman Dhaliwal @ Cinema Sanctum

  • Excerpt: The film risks overstaying its welcome, but the story, the characters, and the craftsmanship makes for a very riveting Indian whodunit.

Random Acts of Violence

Jared Mobarak @ The Film Stage

  • Excerpt: My disappointment is therefore made worse because the capacity to be great is present. In [the filmmakers’] quest to expose [a necessary] truth, they’ve also unwittingly perpetuated it.

Rebuilding Paradise

Mary Ann and Frederic Brussat @ Spirituality & Practice

  • Excerpt: Poignant documentary about how the California community nearly destroyed by fire bands together.

Jared Mobarak @ The Film Stage

  • Excerpt: It’s the type of human-interest story that touches upon the surface of what occurred in a way that hits audiences emotionally without actually saying much.

Red Penguins

Laura Clifford @ Reeling Reviews

  • Excerpt: Gabe Polsky, the writer/director of “Red Army,” returns with a new Russian hockey documentary that may begin amusingly enough, but actually has more in common with Alex Gibney’s “Citizen K” than his own prior film.

Rent-A-Pal

James Jay Edwards @ The Big Smoke America
Mike McGranaghan @ The Aisle Seat

  • Excerpt: A sharp, unsettling portrait of the psychological damage extended periods of loneliness and isolation can inflict on a person.

Eddie Pasa @ DC Filmdom

The Rescue

MaryAnn Johanson @ FlickFilosopher.com

  • Excerpt: This Michael Bay–esque love letter to China Rescue & Salvage may be propaganda, but its enjoyably bonkers melodrama and grippingly engaging action are a lot less obnoxious than any film Bay has made.

Residue

Rich Cline @ Shadows on the Wall

  • Excerpt: First-time writer-director Merawi Gerima takes a kaleidoscopic approach that’s more experimental than narrative, offering a storm of emotions that only occasionally connect with the audience

Shelagh Rowan-Legg @ ScreenAnarchy

  • Excerpt: Residue frames how a place of beauty and family and friendship, one where people looked out for each other, has become strained, slowly being stripped apart.

Resistance

Chris Barsanti @

  • Excerpt: The film is an old-fashioned and straightforward tale of brave opposition to the Nazi occupation of France.

Frederic and Mary Ann Brussat @ SpiritualityandPractice.com

  • Excerpt: True story of the beloved mime Marcel Marceau’s activism to save Jewish children during World War II.

Jared Mobarak @ The Film Stage

  • Excerpt: That the man at the center is Marcel Marceau ultimately becomes a trivial matter once the story cements itself as being about so much more than his not-yet-realized celebrity.

Rewind

Jared Mobarak @ The Film Stage

  • Excerpt: Rewind is as much an advertisement for the Child Advocacy Centers created to better protect victims as it is a cathartic look at [his] arduous fight [for] justice.

Andrew Wyatt @ The Lens

The Roads Not Taken

Candice Frederick @ The Wrap
Jared Mobarak @ JaredMobarak.com

  • Excerpt: Our interest is kept by the stunning wealth of melancholic beauty behind every decision made.

Robert the Bruce

Frederic and Mary Ann Brussat @ SpiritualityandPractice.com

  • Excerpt: Melancholy drama about a Scottish king’s period of discernment.

Robin’s Wish

Mike McGranaghan @ The Aisle Seat

  • Excerpt: A heartbreaking “setting the record straight” documentary about the death of Robin Williams..

Rogue

Dennis Schwartz @ Dennis Schwartz Reviews

  • Excerpt: A low-budget action B pic, armed with explosions and concern for animal abuse in wildlife.

Runner

Beverly Questad @ It’s Just Movies

  • Excerpt: The power of Guor’s story is that we have a choice. We can let that oppression, trauma, and pain consume us or we can let it propel us to something positive.

Saint Frances

Herman Dhaliwal @ Cinema Sanctum

  • Excerpt: It’s a thoroughly delightful watch, full of charming performances from the entire cast, especially from little Ramona Edith Williams. Kelly O’Sullivan makes a strong impression, not only as a lead, but also as a writer.

MaryAnn Johanson @ FlickFilosopher.com

  • Excerpt: Taboo-busting laugh-until-you-cry tale dares to speak of oft-unspoken matters of women’s lives. So very necessary to open up the range of women’s experiences seen as baseline. I love this movie.

Jared Mobarak @ JaredMobarak.com

  • Excerpt: [The film reveals] the one [absolute] we do need: a certainty in our collective uncertainty. Happiness demands wiggle room.

Samurai Marathon

Herman Dhaliwal @ Cinema Sanctum

  • Excerpt: It’s a solid period film that features some engaging characters, a great score from Philip Glass, and some satisfyingly gruesome bloodshed.

Sanditon

Frederic and Mary Ann Brussat @ Spirituality & Practice

  • Excerpt: An eight-part version of Jane Austen’s last novel, a love story and women’s lib tale set in a seaside resort.

Scheme Birds

Ronald wilkinson @ ItsJustMovies.com

  • Excerpt: A solar black hole of infinite social gravity. Without films like this, not even light can escape.

Schwarz Weiss Bunt

Bradley Gibson @ Film Threat

  • Excerpt: Schwarz Weiss Bunt (Black White Color) is a gentle Austrian tale of the perfect time in a young woman’s life. Matilda (Clara Diemling )is finishing college and her world is a continuum from familiar, familial comforts of the past, to the absolute perfection of her untested future.

Scoob!

Herman Dhaliwal @ Cinema Sanctum

  • Excerpt: Scoob! is a perfectly harmless and serviceable distraction, especially for young kids. However, as someone who has always had an affinity for this series, and its characters, I didn’t find a whole lot to like about this film.

MaryAnn Johanson @ FlickFilosopher.com

  • Excerpt: A spectacularly scattershot, pandering mess of pulp junk, cheap-looking animation, and poisonous gender dynamics. A charmless cash-grab that can’t be bothered with the slightest stab at originality.

Scream, Queen!

Rick Aragon @ Rick’s Texan Reviews
Glenn Dunks @ The Film Experience

  • Excerpt: How great it is then to see two new documentaries Scream, Queen! My Nightmare on Elm Street and Horror Noire: A History of Black Horror focusing on these elements and offering glimpses into the complicated realm of what it is like to be a viewer and a creator in these spaces…

Sea Fever

Laura Clifford @ Reeling Reviews

  • Excerpt: a taut little thriller which, while very reminiscent of “Alien,” is steeped in its own world aboard a small trawler. It also couldn’t be more timely, its themes of sacrifice for the common good especially resonant during the COVID-19 pandemic.

Herman Dhaliwal @ Cinema Sanctum

  • Excerpt: The film doesn’t explore a ton of new territory when it comes to stories about monsters, parasitic infections, and mysteries of the unknown, but it still does a solid job at creating tension and thrills with a sense of warmth for the characters.

Seahorse: The Dad Who Gave Birth

MaryAnn Johanson @ FlickFilosopher.com

  • Excerpt: This vital documentary about a trans man’s pregnancy shatters stereotypes along all sorts of vectors, and underscores the fact that however atypical our lives may be, we have more in common than not.

Seberg

Marco Albanese @ Stanze di Cinema [Italian]
Laura Clifford @ Reeling Reviews

  • Excerpt: Screenwriters Joe Shrapnel & Anna Waterhouse turn poetic license into dubious fictionalization told with leaden dialogue frequently guilty of speechifying…weighing down Kristen Stewart’s delicate performance.

MaryAnn Johanson @ FlickFilosopher.com

  • Excerpt: French New Wave icon Jean Seberg plays an unwitting game of cat-and-mouse with the FBI in a strangled blend of biopic and paranoid thriller. Not even always fascinating Kristen Stewart can save this.

Frank Ochieng @ Flick Feast

  • Excerpt: …ambitious but thoroughly disjointed psychological thriller biopic . Both Stewart and her vulnerable inspiration Jean Seberg deserved a better deep dive than this tiptoe through the surfacing waves of despair and disillusionment.

The Secret Garden

MaryAnn Johanson @ FlickFilosopher.com

  • Excerpt: Pointless adaptation of the beloved children’s novel soaked in a gothic spookiness that seems to deliberately misunderstand the story. Neither literal enough nor magical enough. My heart was unmoved.

The Secret: Dare to Dream

MaryAnn Johanson @ FlickFilosopher.com

  • Excerpt: Nice Guy garbage man Josh Lucas negs sad sack Katie Holmes. Based on the pernicious self-help philosophy that insists that everything wrong with your life is your fault. You know: feel-good romance!

Mike McGranaghan @ The Aisle Seat

  • Excerpt: A genial, if increasingly absurd romantic drama.

The Secrets We Keep

Laura Clifford @ Reeling Reviews

  • Excerpt: a thriller that keeps us guessing about Maja’s state of mind as well as the concept of vigilantism. While the film’s trailer emphasizes the more lurid aspects of the film (kidnapping, torture, war crimes), Adler’s execution is far more thoughtful

Mike McGranaghan @ The Aisle Seat

  • Excerpt: A first-rate adult thriller.

Selah and the Spades

Laura Clifford @ Reeling Reviews

  • Excerpt: Poe’s film exhibits far more originality than we normally see in the genre … But it is Lovie Simone’s cool intensity and Celeste O’Connor’s initial smitten bewilderment that turns into her own brand of confidence that ignite “Selah and the Spades.”

Charlie Juhl @ Citizen Charlie

  • Excerpt: Selah and the Spades teases a juicy tale of high school factions and boarding school realpolitik, but it sheds its sharp edge offering forced high school melodrama we can find from any number of YA faucets.

Jared Mobarak @ The Film Stage

  • Excerpt: [Think Election meets Brick] and you can begin to approach the tone Poe provides her film’s power struggle between today’s youth and their own future.

Josh Taylor @ www.forgetfulfilmcritic.com

  • Excerpt: The issues I had with Selah and the Spades were with the writing. The film wants to say too much about the modern high school experience, and as a result, it lands on an issue for no more than a scene before moving on to the next one.

Sergio

Dragan Antulov @ Draxblog VI [Croatian]
Betty Jo Tucker @ ReelTalk Movie Reviews

  • Excerpt: A tribute to a great hero, a man called simply SERGIO. It’s a true story that needs told. We lack heroes in this man’s mold.

The Shadow of Violence

Herman Dhaliwal @ Cinema Sanctum

  • Excerpt: While it may not transcend the genre, the craftsmanship and strong performances manage to resonate because the filmmakers have a firm understanding of what makes crime dramas like these so compelling and emotionally involving in the first place.

Shakuntala Devi

Kathy Gibson @ Access Bollywood

The Sharks

Jared Mobarak @ JaredMobarak.com

  • Excerpt: With the male gaze removed, everything can unfold naturally with relatable awkwardness and appetite.

A Shaun the Sheep Movie: Farmageddon

Herman Dhaliwal @ Cinema Sanctum

  • Excerpt: It’s just a delight from beginning to end, and it provides a refreshingly earnest and old fashioned counterbalance to the kind of noisy, snarky, and quip heavy animated films that tend to come out these days.

Mark Hobin @ Fast Film Reviews

  • Excerpt: Aardman Animations is one of those hallowed traditions in the grand cinema of the UK that includes Michael Caine, Maggie Smith, kitchen sink realism, James Bond, Monty Python, and Agatha Christie adaptations.

She’s Allergic to Cats

Gregory Smalley @ 366 Weird Movies

  • Excerpt: It’s an absurd, nightmarishly funny evocation of the life of a creative schlub trying to grind out a living in an indifferent L.A, and the comic scenes are like catching a spastic case of the giggles just as a panic attack is coming on.

She’s in Portland

Dennis Schwartz @ Dennis Schwartz Reviews

  • Excerpt: It’s too bumpy to enjoy the ride.

Shimla Mirchi

Kathy Gibson @ Access Bollywood

Shiva Baby

Allyson Johnson @ TheYoungFolks.com

Shoot to Marry

Laura Clifford @ Reeling Reviews

  • Excerpt: The film is often amusing, always interesting and admirable in showing women in a very wide spectrum of careers, but that unsettling issue of Markle’s approach, pitching his documentary as one ‘about women,’ while trying to find a mate, nags.

Shubh Mangal Zyada Saavdhan

Tusshar Sasi @ Filmy Sasi

  • Excerpt: The mega responsibility on its shoulders notwithstanding, ‘Shubh Mangal Zyada Saavdhan’ barely makes the cut as a coherent feature film. It is truthful towards LGBTQIA but the film, without doubt, is Ayushmann Khurrana’s weakest in years.

The Silencing

Herman Dhaliwal @ Cinema Sanctum

  • Excerpt: While it may have some missed opportunities, the bleak atmosphere and strong performances, especially from Nikolaj Coster-Waldau, gives you just enough to be engrossed in the story.

El Silencio del pantano

João Pinto @ Portal Cinema [Portuguese and English]

A Simple Wedding

MaryAnn Johanson @ FlickFilosopher.com

  • Excerpt: Charming culture-clash rom-com is full of life, celebrating human universals of family and love, and embracing differences that make the world so interesting. Smart and spritely, feminist and funny.

Skin: A History of Nudity in the Movies

Mike McGranaghan @ The Aisle Seat

  • Excerpt: Always entertaining, thanks to extensive use of clips and some great anecdotes from the various interview subjects.

The Social Dilemma

Mark Hobin @ Fast Film Reviews

  • Excerpt: ** Spoiler Alert ** Social media is addictive.

Someone, Somewhere

Frederic and Mary Ann Brussat @ SpiritualityandPractice.com

  • Excerpt: An enchanting French romantic drama about synchronicity.

Sometimes Always Never

MaryAnn Johanson @ FlickFilosopher.com

  • Excerpt: Gentle kook and visual frolicking bury emotion in this tale of a man mired in grief. Little of its head-scratching whimsy makes a melancholy landing; most just floats away on wisps of insignificance.

Soundwave

Jared Mobarak @ JaredMobarak.com

  • Excerpt: Enough does thankfully come across, however, so we can appreciate what Narang is doing and saying regardless [of the film’s shortcomings].

South Mountain

Laura Clifford @ Reeling Reviews

  • Excerpt: …everything about this small, intimate film feels so natural, lived in and true, Balsam’s performance empathetic and generous.

Ron Wilkinson @ ItsJustMovies.com

  • Excerpt: The bucolic setting of the summer place contrasts with life moving on in uncharted directions.

Spaceship Earth

Laura Clifford @ Reeling Reviews

  • Excerpt: The documentary is an awe-inspiring account of what can be accomplished when humans cooperate on a common cause… an incredible, decades long journey taken by an impressive and unique cast of characters. Go along for the ride.

MaryAnn Johanson @ FlickFilosopher.com

  • Excerpt: Was Biosphere 2 scientific adventure or eco-entertainment? This is a gripping portrait of the billionaire’s folly/performance-art project, a hippie SF soap opera with unsettling resonance for today.

Jared Mobarak @ JaredMobarak.com

  • Excerpt: Wolf renders [those bigger and more crucial] truths as bit players in the background of a puff piece about John Allen and the Synergia Ranch.

Josh Taylor @ www.forgetfulfilmcritic.com

  • Excerpt: Filmmaker Matt Wolf paints in a sympathetic light the oddball collective who made the 1991 Biosphere 2 project a reality, but he also digs deeper into their unique approach to life. Spaceship Earth is a fascinating study of both recent history and the most eclectic group of people you’re likely ever to meet.

Spenser Confidential

Frank Ochieng @ The Critical Movie Critics

  • Excerpt: …[a] witless cop caper…this charmless action-comedy suspense piece will result in yet another disposable salt-and-pepper buddy flick aiming for low rent chuckles.

Spinster

Eddie Pasa @ DC Filmdom
Shelagh Rowan-Legg @ ScreenAnarchy

Spiral

Karl Delossantos @ Smash Cut

  • Excerpt: Spiral is a mysterious act of dread and atmosphere that also taps into the inherent horror of being different in a world that isn’t ready to accept that.

C.H. Newell @ Father Son Holy Gore

  • Excerpt: A tense, terrifying ride, as well as a compelling look at intersectional queer fear(s) via a horror lens.

Spree

Herman Dhaliwal @ Cinema Sanctum

  • Excerpt: Though the film occasionally stumbles in trying to make a point, its an energetic and entertaining ride. Joe Keery delivers a starmaking performance that allows him to showcase the kind of range he never had the chance to explore before.

Dennis Schwartz @ Dennis Schwartz Reviews

  • Excerpt: A baseless thriller critiquing the social-media craze for being an addiction.

Stage Mother

Rich Cline @ Shadows on the Wall

  • Excerpt: There’s plenty of colourful drag queen energy in this comedy-drama, but director Thom Fitzgerald keeps the tone introspective, adding thoughtful undercurrents and a big beating heart

Standing Up, Falling Down

Jared Mobarak @ The Film Stage

  • Excerpt: The plot’s obviousness melts away because we’re having a genuinely great time as these flawed men grow ever so slightly with each passing minute. They feel real.

Betty Jo Tucker @ ReelTalk Movie Reviews

  • Excerpt: This dramedy falters by presenting too many awkward scenes that don’t seem real. But Billy Crystal’s fine lived-in performance makes the movie a must-see for his fans.

Starting at Zero: Reimagining Education in America

MaryAnn Johanson @ FlickFilosopher.com

  • Excerpt: Is this a documentary about quality day care for the smallest kids, or a slick PowerPoint presentation for policy wonks about the economic need to churn out cooperative corporate cogs from babyhood?

State Funeral

Glenn Dunks @ glenn-dunks.com

  • Excerpt: Sergei Loznitsa’s 135-minute triumph is a beast of a film and one with its roots firmly in Soviet documentary (it was, after all, resurrected out of scraps of a different film). A herculean effort of archival dumpster diving that is something of a prequel to Loznitsa’s potent fall-of-the-USSR doc The Event (which I listed as the 7th best documentary of the decade) from 2015…

Stray

Dennis Schwartz @ Dennis Schwartz Reviews

  • Excerpt: It’s the kind of indie art-house film that lets you love it for itself.

Stray Dolls

Frank Ochieng @ Flick Feast

  • Excerpt: Sinha, in addition to emphasizing the harried bond of her feminine tag team drenched in decadent turmoil, shines a revealing spotlight on blue-collar working class drudgery in all its puddles of purgatory.

Street Dancer 3D

Kathy Gibson @ Access Bollywood

Streetlight Harmonies

Frederic and Mary Ann Brussat @ SpiritualityandPractice.com

  • Excerpt: A rollicking and revealing documentary about the birth and evolution of Doo-Wop music.

Suk Suk

Richard Gray @ The Reel Bits

  • Excerpt: An important bit of commentary that explores both ageism and homophobia in Hong Kong via some solid central performances.

The Sunlit Night

Andrea Chase @ KillerMovieReviews.com

  • Excerpt: Rich in gorgeous cinematography that makes a grey landscape as dazzling as primary colors, and quietly complex performances that reveal unspoken volumes

MaryAnn Johanson @ FlickFilosopher.com

  • Excerpt: A ramble with appealingly messy people rethinking their priorities that is perhaps more charming and touching than it might have been if this pandemic summer didn’t have so many of us doing the same.

Jared Mobarak @ The Film Stage

  • Excerpt: [Slate’s] ability to be hilarious despite a quiet role like Frances lends an indelible charm that ensures we’re in her corner from the beginning.

The Surrogate

Mary Ann and Frederic Brussat @ Spirituality & Practice

  • Excerpt: An ethically rich drama about the complicated choices involved in pregnancy and parenting.

Jared Mobarak @ The Film Stage

  • Excerpt: The result can be frustratingly militant in its desire to show all angles of its central conflict, but the questions it makes us ask ourselves are worth it.

Dennis Schwartz @ Dennis Schwartz Movie Reviews

  • Excerpt: Smart but talky indie drama of liberal New Yorkers concerned with a surrogate pregnancy and Down syndrome, as well as morality issues over abortion.

Synchronic

Jared Mobarak @ The Film Stage

  • Excerpt: Where I could forget the genre element in [previous films] to latch onto the people therein, the opposite proves true here. While still objectively enough, I [did want] more.

System Crasher

Frank Ochieng @ Flick Feast

  • Excerpt: …startling and grippingly raw portrait of childhood monstrosity. Zengel’s furious face is resourcefully inspired as her walking wounded minor is a major firecracker with atom bomb-like capabilities.

Tanhaji: The Unsung Hero

Tusshar Sasi @ Filmy Sasi

  • Excerpt: When life gives you lemons, make lemonade. Likewise, when Bollywood gives you historicals, subtract the history out of it. So yes, Ajay Devgn ‘s ‘Tanhaji’ works solely and adequately as a well-shot fantasy fare.

Tape

MaryAnn Johanson @ FlickFilosopher.com

  • Excerpt: Messy, furious, sometimes at odds with itself, this tale of documenting a powerful man’s sexual intimidation of a vulnerable woman is absolutely necessary, full of a rage that is absolutely vital.

The Tax Collector

Herman Dhaliwal @ Cinema Sanctum

  • Excerpt: The Tax Collector doesn’t add up to all that much, especially compared to David Ayer’s more successful attempts at exploring similar themes. But if you are a fan of David Ayer’s particular brand of slime and grime, it will offer some trashy entertainment.

Jared Mobarak @ JaredMobarak.com

  • Excerpt: A lot of The Tax Collector does [work] before it’s bogged down by misjudged sentimentality.

Ten Minutes to Midnight

C.H. Newell @ Father Son Holy Gore

  • Excerpt: Beneath the blood and teeth are timely issues about women in the entertainment industry.

The Tent

Eddie Pasa @ DC Filmdom

Thappad

Tusshar Sasi @ Thappad

  • Excerpt: Helmed by Anubhav Sinha, ‘Thappad’ neither makes compromises nor treads side roads to reach its destination. It knows where to go & how to get there. This Taapsee Pannu-starrer is the most accomplished Hindi language film in a long time.

Think Like a Dog

João Pinto @ Portal Cinema [Portuguese]

Tiger King: Murder, Mayhem and Madness

Glenn Dunks @ The Film Experience

  • Excerpt: Scratch beneath the veneer of its sneering Christopher-Guest-goes-to-the-trailer-park milieu and Tiger King proves to be lazy at best, morally corrupt at worst.

Tigertail

Herman Dhaliwal @ Cinema Sanctum

  • Excerpt: The film leaves so many blanks and loose threads for its audience to mentally fill in, but Alan Yang still showcases an empathetic eye and a knack for lush visual storytelling that, over time, can really flourish into something special.

Time To Hunt

Herman Dhaliwal @ Cinema Sanctum

  • Excerpt: The filmmaking is stellar, making wonderful use of color, space, and sound. Filmmaker, Yoon Sung-hyun, handles the tension incredibly well.

Time Warp: The Greatest Cult Films of All Time, Vol. 1: Midnight Madness

Gregory Smalley @ 366 Weird Movies

  • Excerpt: At bottom, it’s just a bunch of knowledgeable film fans sitting around yakking about some of their favorite films, which just also happen to be some of the wildest, weirdest, and most unique visions ever committed to celluloid.

The Times of Bill Cunningham

Jonathan Richards @ www.santafenewmexican.com

  • Excerpt: This hour and a quarter in the company of the late photographer (he died after a stroke in 2016, at 87, still riding his bicycle to the end) is never less than engaging, even when he tears up on camera when discussing the AIDS epidemic and lost friends.

Josh Taylor @ www.forgetfulfilmcritic.com

  • Excerpt: What’s the next step up from cotton candy when comparing entertainment to food? Pop rocks? Gummy bears? I’m asking because Netflix’s release To All the Boys: P.S. I Still Love You is that. It’s not as ephemeral as cotton candy; it feels more substantial.

Betty Jo Tucker @ ReelTalk Movie Reviews

  • Excerpt: Although not as entertaining as the original film, this sequel includes moments of sheer delight. Happily, the two main characters are just as watchable as before.

To the Stars

MaryAnn Johanson @ FlickFilosopher.com

  • Excerpt: Coming-of-age melodrama about misfit girls is at first passingly diverting, but it whips up mystery and suspense where it shouldn’t be, diminishing and minimizing an already neglected kind of story.

Jared Mobarak @ JaredMobarak.com

  • Excerpt: [The filmmakers] know that a physical makeover might turn heads, but the character’s already established personality is what has to keep those people looking.

Tommaso

Eddie Pasa @ DC Filmdom
Beverly Questad @ It’s Just Movies

  • Excerpt: At center, there is a feeling that Ferrara believes that love is what gives a person meaning, worth, and value. So, his greatest fear is that he is unlovable.

Train to Busan Presents: Peninsula

Laura Clifford @ Reeling Reviews

  • Excerpt: …this zombie adventure tale by way of “Mad Max Beyond Thunderdome,” AMC’s ‘The Walking Dead’ and countless videogames is entertaining enough, but its pretentious U.S. title of “Train to Busan Presents: Peninsula” promises more than it delivers.

Richard Gray @ The Reel Bits

  • Excerpt: The highly-anticipated sequel to zombie Train to Busan delivers the goods, even if the tone and pace are completely different to its predecessor.

Mike McGranaghan @ The Aisle Seat

  • Excerpt: The film has its own brand of cleverness that makes it an enjoyable watch.

Eddie Pasa @ DC Filmdom

The Traitor

Laura Clifford @ Reeling Reviews

  • Excerpt: Marco Bellocchio’s (“Vincere”) epic tale of the man who brought down the Italian mob (Italy’s submission for the International Film Oscar) is probably easier to dive into in its home country where one presumes Buscetta’s story is as well known as Whitey Bulger’s is in Boston.

Charlie Juhl @

  • Excerpt: Was the man who brought down the Sicilian mob a rat or a defender of the true mafia? Director Marco Bellocchio has a strong opinion, but The Traitor may be too nebulous for an audience uninitiated in the subject matter.

Ron Wilkinson @ itsjustmovies.com

  • Excerpt: A powerful story well told presages a cloudy future with no silver lining.

Trance

Tusshar Sasi @ Filmy Sasi

  • Excerpt: Anwar Rasheed makes his comeback film richly fulfilling as far as his craft is concerned. That aside, ‘Trance’, fuelled by a zestful lead act by Fahadh Faasil, deserved a firmer screenplay to have become truly path-breaking.

The Trip to Greece

Laura Clifford @ Reeling Reviews

  • Excerpt: After Winterbottom took his lads to Spain this formulaic foodie franchise felt like it had run out of gas, yet despite the fourth film following exactly the same beats as the three previous entries, Greece turns out to be a much more worthy sendoff.

Herman Dhaliwal @ Cinema Sanctum

  • Excerpt: Sitting down to watch these movies have felt like catching up with old friends while luxuriating in stunning vistas and amazing food, and as bittersweet as it is for this to be the final film, it ends on a strong note.

James Jay Edwards @ The Big Smoke America
Charlie Juhl @ Citizen Charlie

  • Excerpt: The schtick and tête-à-tête between the pair as they poke at one another is the exact same routine they pulled off nearly 10 years ago, only the balcony views have changed. Winterbottom and company are coasting, but the humor remains top shelf.

Trolls World Tour

Mark Hobin @ Fast Film Reviews

  • Excerpt: It’s like eating Pixy Stix laced with Pop Rocks paired with a shot of Mountain Dew.

Eddie Pasa @
Betty Jo Tucker @ ReelTalk Movie Reviews

  • Excerpt: Marvelous singing and dancing take over the screen in this creative sequel, which makes me very happy because I’m the world’s most avid movie musical fan.

Trolls: World Tour

MaryAnn Johanson @ FlickFilosopher.com

  • Excerpt: As pastel and glittery as its predecessor, with a silliness more glorious and less forced. Sweet, smart, sincere… but it doesn’t deserve to be carrying the future of movies on its little shoulders.

Troop Zero

Betty Jo Tucker @ ReelTalk Movie Reviews

  • Excerpt: Some things like bullying are not funny in life or in TROOP ZERO. But talented child star Mckenna Grace’s impressive portrayal of a spunky little underdog back in 1977 rural Georgia makes this youthful comedy worth seeing.

The Trouble with Being Born

Chris Barsanti @ Slant Magazine

  • Excerpt: In the end, the film suffers from the same issue as its moody androids: enervation borne out of repetition.

The Truth

Andrea Chase @ KillerMovieReviews.com

  • Excerpt: As the often wildly funny drama plays out, lies are told to convey the truth of feelings, truths are unspoken for the same reasons.

Laura Clifford @ Reeling Reviews

  • Excerpt: We’ve all seen the tale of an aging actress chafing against younger competition, but Kore-eda’s found a new twist using his old tricks.

The Turning

Herman Dhaliwal @ Cinema Sanctum

  • Excerpt: Some effectively creepy moments and decent performances are not enough to make up for a lackluster adaptation.

Courtney Howard @ Variety

  • Excerpt: Lacking spine-tingling dread, taut tension, and the deservingly provocative ending needed to make its modern sentiments land, this re-imagining is less than a classic.

MaryAnn Johanson @ FlickFilosopher.com

  • Excerpt: Strips away the ambiguity of the source story to leave us with lazy jump scares, visual gloom, and a cheap cheat of an ending. Gaslights its protagonist and, incredibly enragingly, the viewer, too.

Tuscaloosa

James Jay Edwards @ The Big Smoke America

Tyler Perry’s A Fall From Grace

Frank Ochieng @ Flick Feast

  • Excerpt: …transparent and turgid. A Fall From Grace is so much of a mockery that this cinematic cyst may have the moviemaker returning back to wearing Madea’s saggy panties.

Uncle Peckerhead

James Jay Edwards @ The Big Smoke America
James Jay Edwards @ The Big Smoke America

Uncorked

Mark Hobin @ Fast Film Reviews

  • Excerpt: Did you know that Jay-Z = chardonnay, Kanye West = pinot grigio, and Drake = riesling. That info alone is enough for me to recommend this film.

Betty Jo Tucker @ ReelTalk Movie Reviews

  • Excerpt: Niecy Nash almost steals this movie as a proud mother who just wants her son to be happy. Her scenes with Mamoudou Athie are pure joy!

Under the Open

Allyson Johnson @ TheYoungFolks.com

Until the Birds Return

Beverly Questad @ It’s Just Movies

  • Excerpt: How responsible are we when we see an injustice happen and we do nothing? Karim Moussaoui, an Algerian writer/director, presents three perspectives on this in his masterpiece.

Vampire Burt’s Serenade

Gregory J. Smalley @ 366 Weird Movies

  • Excerpt: Who would have guessed that someday Kevin Richardson would be working with even weaker material than he did when he was in the Backstreet Boys?

Verotika

Mike McGranaghan @ The Aisle Seat

  • Excerpt: Verotika is a thoroughly baffling work that has to be seen to be believed. And aficionados of movies that are crazy-town banana-pants absolutely should see it.

Villain

Laura Clifford @ Reeling Reviews

  • Excerpt: a gritty English gangster film that, while covering no new ground, is steeped in local atmosphere and a sympathetic performance from Fairbrass, who embodies Bob Hoskins’ tough-yet-soft demeanor mixed with the brute physicality of Vinny Jones…

Herman Dhaliwal @ Cinema Sanctum

  • Excerpt: Despite the familiarity of numerous elements in Villain, it’s still comes together as a rock solid gangster film that efficiently puts its focus on dramatizing the complicated and largely internal journey of our lead character, which is well performed by Craig Fairbrass.

Ron Wilkinson @ ItsJustMovies.com

  • Excerpt: A predictable gangster family revenge film makes good.

Vitalina Varela

Laura Clifford @ Reeling Reviews

  • Excerpt: The film, shot almost entirely at night by cinematographer Leonardo Simões, is breathtakingly beautiful…In one beautiful bit of alchemy, clothespins appear as raised praying hands over black cloaks which dance as Vitalina edges past them.

Jared Mobarak @ JaredMobarak.com

  • Excerpt: Vitalina Varela isn’t going to be for everyone as a result. It might be slow moving, but it’s emotionally profound.

Ronald wilkinson @ itsjustmovies.com

  • Excerpt: Masterful cinema and a no holds barred lesson about people who are counted out and find hope in themselves.

Vitch

Dennis Schwartz @ Dennis Schwartz Reviews

  • Excerpt: It took some three years to make this well-executed and uniquely personal investigative journalism film.

Voices in the Wind

Scott Phillips @ www.themovieisle.com

Volition

Herman Dhaliwal @ Cinema Sanctum

  • Excerpt: I spent much of it admiring how creative it was, and how confident the filmmaking is. It also shows the potential of exploring complex ideas through simple yet effective storytelling.

James Wegg @

  • Excerpt: “Our choices don’t matter”

Waiting for the Barbarians

Sarah Boslaugh @ TheArtsSTL

  • Excerpt: The lack of specificity serves the film’s key argument, that colonialism itself is corrupting, independent of any details about how it is executed in this or that location or time period.

Bavner Donaldo @ Cinejour [Indonesian]
Jared Mobarak @ The Film Stage

  • Excerpt: [It contains] a lesson perfectly suited to this moment in our global history because it demands that we reflect upon our respective privilege and [its inherent] hypocrisies.

The Wanting Mare

Jared Mobarak @ JaredMobarak.com

  • Excerpt: As the years turn Anmaere ever darker [we’re reminded] that paradise isn’t something to chase, but something to build.

Wasp Network

Chris Barsanti @ Slant

  • Excerpt: The final product feels like more of an interesting and beautifully filmed anecdote than compelling political and human drama.

The Wave

Brent McKnight @ The Last Thing I See

  • Excerpt: It feels tailor made to spark shallow philosophical musings from stoners sitting on couches rather than offering any real insight. Still, it’s fun enough, uses, but doesn’t overuse, keen psychedelic visuals, and as a debut feature, shows off Klabin’s inventive and peculiar eye.

Jared Mobarak @ The Film Stage

  • Excerpt: I’m not completely sure [the filmmakers] hoped for “deepness” anyway. This is a comedy of the stoner variety despite its philosophical quandaries and sci-fi underpinnings.

Gregory J. Smalley @ 366 Weird Movies

  • Excerpt: Rough patches aside, the crisp acting, inventive visuals, and speedy pace make it a trip you probably won’t regret taking.

The Way I See It

Andrea Chase @ KillerMovieReviews.com

  • Excerpt: bittersweet nostalgia for the Obama years tempered with barely suppressed rage at who is now leading this country.

Allyson Johnson @ TheYoungFolks.com
Mike McGranaghan @ The Aisle Seat

  • Excerpt: A massively entertaining documentary about a guy whose job gave him a front row seat to history.

We Are Little Zombies

Eddie Pasa @ DC Filmdom
GregoryJ. Smalley @ 366 Weird Movies

  • Excerpt: It wrings a surprising amount of depth from its short attention span style, and a surprising amount of empathy from its tale of children whose defining characteristic is that they have no emotions.

We Have Boots

Bev Questad @ itsjustmovies.com

  • Excerpt: n 2020, the year of BLM, we now know the reason for the umbrellas – to protect the protestors from the tear gas and pepper spray used by the police to debilitate them. The boots are for walking for as long as it takes.

James Wegg @

  • Excerpt: “No freedom for their homeland”

Welcome to Chechnya

Mary Ann and Frederic Brussat @ Spirituality & Practice

  • Excerpt: A gripping documentary about LGBTQ genocide and a brave band of human rights activists trying to rescue those affected.

Laura Clifford @ Reeling Reviews

  • Excerpt: : as pure an example of ‘sophomore slump’ as I have seen, a muddled reimagining of the J.M. Barrie tale as gritty, retro magical realism with a Peter Pan (newcomer Yashua Mack) more giggling tyrant than free-spirited leader.

Dan Lybarger @ Arkansas Democrat-Gazette

  • Excerpt: You can find components of Peter Pan in Wendy, but locating the spirit is far more difficult. Peter had an easier time locating his shadow.

Jared Mobarak @ JaredMobarak.com

  • Excerpt: [Wendy] is our eyes and ears to experience this bewitching land of infinite possibilities and to see beyond the metaphor of “Mother’s” monstrous beauty.

What She Said: The Art of Pauline Kael

Laura Clifford @ Reeling Reviews

  • Excerpt: presents a wide ranging overview of the influential critic – one just wishes it were a little more analytical itself.

Josh Taylor @ www.forgetfulfilmcritic.com

  • Excerpt: What She Said is a consistently entertaining and enlightening look at Kael. Every person – this writer most certainly included – wrestling with their movie obsession, as well as the movies themselves, owes her a great debt.

Whirlybird

Kyle Anderson @ Nerdist

The Whistlers

Laura Clifford @ Reeling Reviews

  • Excerpt: Ten years later [after “Police, Adjective”], Porumboiu’s subverting language with music, both with a cheeky soundtrack featuring Iggy Pop and opera and the whistling that allows our protagonist to communicate while escaping detection.

Herman Dhaliwal @ Cinema Sanctum

  • Excerpt: It’s style is minimal, but clear and effective. And while I didn’t love it, it was an engaging watch.

Jared Mobarak @ JaredMobarak.com

  • Excerpt: The Whistlers lives up to its comedy billing with a bone-dry humor floating just below the surface [of the plot’s dramatic severity].

Aaron Neuwirth @ We Live Entertainment

  • Excerpt: The Whistlers provides a level of satisfaction anyone with a desire to screw around with genre would want.

A White, White Day

Frederic and Mary Ann Brussat @ SpiritualityandPractice.com

  • Excerpt: A powerfully realized psychological drama about grief and other imponderables.

Widow of Silence

Mary Ann and Frederic Brussat @ Spirituality & Practice

  • Excerpt: An ethically charged and mesmerizing movie about the unusual and yet predictable challenges faced by a half-widow in Kashmir.

The Wild Goose Lake

Laura Clifford @ Reeling Reviews

  • Excerpt: …a thing of great beauty, a hotel room conflict cast in fuchsia, cinematographer Dong Jingsong flipping noir’s canted window blind lighting on its head and punching up nighttime exteriors with modern neon practicals, playing with his frame like a Lite Brite.

Ron Wilkinson @ itsjustmovies.com

  • Excerpt: The energy is not there to grab and hold western audiences. Just as well, we will always have Bogie.

The Willoughbys

Herman Dhaliwal @ Cinema Sanctum

  • Excerpt: It’s a delight, and while it doesn’t necessarily stray too far from conventions, it is rich with humor, energy, and dazzling animation from start to finish.

Mark Hobin @ Fast Film Reviews

  • Excerpt: The frenetic narrative rarely stops to take a pause. However, I did slowly warm up to the film’s wacky approach

Brent McKnight @ Giant Freakin’ Robot

  • Excerpt: By turns, ‘The Willoughbys’ is harrowing and joyous, fun and chaotic, and while earnest and giddy, it’s messy and jumbled.

Wira

Herman Dhaliwal @ Cinema Sanctum

  • Excerpt: Wira offers some satisfying action that is brutal, but not gruesome, and it is anchored by a story that, while not the most unpredictable, is filled with characters that are easy to root for.

A Witness Out of the Blue

Brent McKnight @ The Last Thing I See

  • Excerpt: A Witness Out of the Blue has all the earmarks of a classic Hong Kong crime saga. There’s murder, slick production values, a twisting plot, shades of moral ambiguity, standoffs, shootouts, and a parrot. Wait, what?

Brent McKnight @ The Last Thing I See

  • Excerpt: A Witness Out of the Blue has all the earmarks of a classic Hong Kong crime saga. There’s murder, slick production values, a twisting plot, shades of moral ambiguity, standoffs, shootouts, and a parrot. Wait, what?

The Wolf House

Laura Clifford @ Reeling Reviews

  • Excerpt: Simply put, this mind blowing, multi media stop motion animation is like nothing you have ever seen before… With their first feature length film, Cociña and León have broken new ground, combining the tale of the Three Little Pigs with psychological breakdown within the little known history of Colonia Dignidad.

Wolfwalkers

Allyson Johnson @ TheYoungFolks.com
Jared Mobarak @ The Film Stage

  • Excerpt: A gorgeous journey towards compassionate enlightenment on behalf of a people seeking the same for themselves.

The Woman Who Loves Giraffes

Frederic and Mary Ann Brussat @ Spirituality & Practice

  • Excerpt: A profile of a researcher whose studies of giraffes in the wild put her in the same league as Jane Goodall and Dian Fossey.

Laura Clifford @ Reeling Reviews

  • Excerpt: …an 83 minute film which feels like it would be better served as a one hour PBS offering.

The Woman Who Ran

Dennis Schwartz @ Dennis Schwartz Reviews

  • Excerpt: Playful, breezy and uneventful drama.

Work It

Betty Jo Tucker @ ReelTalk Movie Reviews

  • Excerpt: WORK IT boasts a passion for dance plus a touch of teenage romance. It ends up as a fun dance flick; great dancing here the winning trick.

Working Man

Beverly Questad @ It’s Just Movies

  • Excerpt: Written by Robert Jury, this is a gifted presentation that gently probes the human psyche and its response to sadness and tragedy. How we can still rise, despite the encumbrance of events not our fault, is the guts of Jury’s investigation.

The Wrong Missy

Joao Pinto @ Portal Cinema [Portuguese]

You Cannot Kill David Arquette

Mike McGranaghan @ The Aisle Seat

  • Excerpt: A poignant redemption tale.

You Don’t Nomi

Mark Hobin @ Fast Film Reviews

  • Excerpt: An enjoyable and informative documentary about Paul Verhoeven’s “Showgirls”.

You Don’t Nomi

Rick Aragon @ Rick’s Texan Reviews
Laura Clifford @ Reeling Reviews

  • Excerpt: Like “Room 237,” “You Don’t Nomi” may not convince with some of its outrageous claims, but it is an entertaining look back at a notorious cinema flop that was bad in all the right ways.

Brent McKnight @ The Last Thing I See

  • Excerpt: In the first ten minutes, people remark, “Showgirls is about two men, who maybe did a lot of cocaine, drunk with power in Hollywood,” “You can’t look away from Showgirls or you’ll miss something huge, like a car crash or a vomit,” and “A type of comedy I don’t think you can make on purpose.” Needless to say, ‘You Don’t Nomi’ is a damn fine time.

You Should Have Left

Laura Clifford @ Reeling Reviews

  • Excerpt: This is all pretty freaky stuff, but as Theo writes in his journal while his reflection in the window isn’t always doing the same, we begin to get a sense of déjà vu (just as we did when Stephen King began to repeat himself with “Secret Window,” also adapted by Koepp).

Herman Dhaliwal @ Cinema Sanctum

  • Excerpt: The film is perfectly watchable, mostly due to Kevin Bacon’s performance, but it’s simplistic story leads into a mediocre and forgettable experience.

Federico Furzan @ Cinelipsis [Spanish]

Young Ahmed

Frederic and Mary Ann Brussat @ Spirituality & Practice

  • Excerpt: An intense and sobering portrait of both sides of the spiritual practice of zeal.

Z

C.H. Newell @ Father Son Holy Gore

  • Excerpt: The lasting effect of the film is in its allegory of how mental illness attaches itself to us, to the point we sometimes find comfort in it.

Ze Pedro Rock’n’roll

Paulo Portugal @ insider.pt [Portuguese]

Zola

Dennis Schwartz @ Dennis Schwartz Reviews

  • Excerpt: Some are hooked more than others to her wild story.

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