Classics and Other Films on DVD (Nov. 4, 2013)

Here are our latest reviews of films on DVD from 2011 and earlier.

El Barón del Terror

Roderick Heath @ This Island Rod

  • Excerpt: The black sense of humour here feels again anticipatory of the bolder bent of many later horror filmmakers…

Barricade

Dennis Schwartz @ Dennis Schwartz Movie Reviews

  • Excerpt: Absurd prestige western, whose muddled story doesn’t make sense.

Black Sunday

Tim Brayton @ Antagony & Ecstasy

  • Excerpt: A tremendous start to what would end up being one of the most brilliant careers in all of horror.

Blood from the Mummy’s Tomb

Tim Brayton @ Antagony & Ecstasy

  • Excerpt: Turns out that the only thing keeping mummy films from reaching their full potential as troubling stories of murder and psychosis were the mummies.

Child’s Play

Simon Miraudo @ Quickflix

Confessions of an Opium Eater

Peter Nellhaus @ Coffee Coffee and more Coffee

Creepshow 2

M. Enois Duarte @ High-Def Digest.com

Dois de Brisseau

Victor Bruno @ O Caminho Alternativo [Brazilian Portuguese]

  • Excerpt: Brief notes on Céline and De bruite et de fureur, two films by French filmmaker Jean-Claude Brisseau

The Exorcist

Roderick Heath @ Ferdy on Films

  • Excerpt: Whilst its reputation as a classic of the horror genre has only grown stronger in the intervening 40 years, the impact it had in its day seems practically unreproducible now, as it’s hard to imagine a modern horror movie driving as deep into the secret anxieties and wrenching such phobic reactions from such a large audience.

The Fast and the Furious (1955)

Dennis Schwartz @ Dennis Schwartz Movie Reviews

  • Excerpt: Uninvolving minor crime drama.

Godzilla (1954)

Tim Brayton @ Antagony & Ecstasy

  • Excerpt: A masterpiece: even in its most generic elements, it’s never just a monster movie, but a fantastic depiction of how humans survive and struggle.”

Halloweentown (1998)

Benjamin Kramer @ The Voracious Filmgoer

  • Excerpt: …charmingly aimed directly at a child’s point of view.

The Horrible Dr. Hichcock

Tim Brayton @ Antagony & Ecstasy

  • Excerpt: While there’s a lot to like about the film as pure Gothic horror, it’s at its very best when it’s asking unresolved, uncomfortable questions about sexual behavior.

A Lizard in a Woman’s Skin

Tim Brayton @ Antagony & Ecstasy

  • Excerpt: The second of [Lucio Fulci’s] gialli, and perhaps the most exemplary among the four.

Mr. Nobody (2009)

Dennis Schwartz @ Dennis Schwartz Movie Reviews

  • Excerpt: Messy but intriguing science-fiction film.

My Neighbor Totoro

Gregory J. Smalley @ 366 Weird Movies

  • Excerpt: Totoro doesn’t have bad guys or moments of serious jeopardy because its ultimate message to kids is that they don’t have to be scared by life’s challenges and changes; the unknown isn’t a threat, it’s an opportunity.

A Place of One’s Own

Dennis Schwartz @ Dennis Schwartz Movie Reviews

  • Excerpt: An enchanting atmospheric supernatural mystery thriller that was overlooked upon its release.

Red-Haird Sunset

Victor Bruno @ Peephole Journal

  • Excerpt: A piece on the use of light in John Ford’s She Wore a Yellow Ribbon

The Seventh Victim

Roderick Heath @ Ferdy on Films

  • Excerpt: Not the most popular or famous of Val Lewton’s epochal series of low-budget horror films made for RKO Studios, The Seventh Victim is the deepest, the most original, perhaps the darkest, a film that tends to weave a powerful spell on those who tune into its peculiar wavelength.

Slaughter Trail

Dennis Schwartz @ Dennis Schwartz Movie Reviews

  • Excerpt: Routine western with an unconvincing redemption scene at the end.

Somewhere

Marty Mapes @ Movie Habit

  • Excerpt: Don’t cry for the movie star, even if they don’t have the glamorous life you imagine

The Uninvited (1944)

M. Enois Duarte @ High-Def Digest.com

Winter in Wartime

Marty Mapes @ Movie Habit

  • Excerpt: A child-witness-to-war movie gets lost in a convention-driven screenplay

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