Classics and Other Films on DVD (Jul. 28, 2014)

Here are our latest reviews of films on DVD.

Reviews of Classic Films

Atlantic City

Cole Smithey @ ColeSmithey.com

  • Excerpt: “Atlantic City” is full of compact social editorializing that elevates its seemingly run-of-the-mill trappings into something sublime by way of its emotionally dependent characters. The depth of this drama lies in how deeply you feel for these individuals.

Jane Eyre (1944)

M. Enois Duarte @ High-Def Digest.com

Lola

Jamie S. Rich @ Criterion Confessions

  • Excerpt: Demy sees his heroine as more than just a pretty object for men to desire, but an example of what that desire forces women to do in order to survive. Lola pushes and pulls as necessary to maintain control, accepting the male gaze and bending it as it suits her.

Mr. Smith Goes to Washington

Kristen Lopez @ Journeys in Classic Film

  • Excerpt: Mr. Smith Goes to Washington is a classic which lives up to the reputation around it.

Picnic at Hanging Rock

Tony Dayoub @ Cinema Viewfinder

  • Excerpt: HANGING ROCK is a subtler and kinder expression of burgeoning womanhood than the darker, more overt THE BEGUILED in which Clint Eastwood’s introduction into a similar environment causes the all-female staff and students to lose their heads over his presence.

Pink Flamingos

Cole Smithey @ ColeSmithey.com

  • Excerpt: John Waters’s second movie not only set the low bar for just how gross a midnight movie could be in 1972, “Pink Flamingos” remains to this day the most cogently transgressive and anarchic film ever made.

Red River

Tony Dayoub @ Cinema Viewfinder

  • Excerpt: Intentional or not, consider RED RIVER the first shot across the bow of traditional, personality-driven Hollywood acting by the New York-based Actors Studio proponents of the Method.

Wild Strawberries

Cole Smithey @ ColeSmithey.com

  • Excerpt: “Wild Strawberries” is a thematically abundant film that fluidly condenses a lifetime’s worth of experience into succinct cinematic fragments under Ingmar Bergman’s complex construction of abstract corollaries.

Recent Home Video Releases

Bethlehem

Peter Nellhaus @ Coffee Coffee and more Coffee

The End of Time

Gregory J. Smalley @ 366 Weird Movies

  • Excerpt: The overall result—abstract and meandering, sometimes deep, sometimes pretentious, beautiful but frequently slow as molasses—is definitely not for all tastes.

A Fantastic Fear of Everything

Gregory J. Smalley @ 366 Weird Movies

  • Excerpt: The movie has bursts of creativity, but never develops the consistently crazy energy it needs.

Home Video Hovel: We’re in the Movies: Palace of Silents & Itinerant Filmmaking

Aaron Pinkston @ Battleship Pretension

The Scalphunters

Jamie S. Rich @ DVD Talk

  • Excerpt: Though the action doesn’t quite match up to the progressive ideas, 1968’s The Scalphunters makes for an interesting entry in the revisionist Western genre. Sydney Pollack directs Burt Lancaster and Ossie Davis as a cowboy and an escaped slave who clash over ideas about where they each rank in society, but who end up realizing that their individual survival generally hinges on many of the same things.

Sympathy for Mr. Vengeance

Peter Nellhaus @ Coffee Coffee and more Coffee

Transcendence

M. Enois Duarte @ High-Def Digest.com

Transcendence

M. Enois Duarte @ High-Def Digest.com

Other Reviews from 2012 and earlier

Dead Kids

M. Enois Duarte @ High-Def Digest.com

Doctor Dolittle (1967)

Rick Aragon @ Rick’s Cafe Texan

  • Excerpt: Somehow, I find it fitting that Doctor Dolittle is about animals, given that the film is a gigantic turkey.

The Final Terror

M. Enois Duarte @ High-Def Digest.com

Flatliners

M. Enois Duarte @ High-Def Digest.com

Frightmare

M. Enois Duarte @ High-Def Digest.com

The housemaid (1960)

Dennis Schwartz @ Dennis Schwartz Movie Reviews

Judex (1916)

Dennis Schwartz @ Dennis Schwartz Movie Reviews

Kiki

Dennis Schwartz @ Dennis Schwartz Movie Reviews

Many Wars Ago

M. Enois Duarte @ High-Def Digest.com

Othello

Rick Aragon @ Rick’s Cafe Texan

  • Excerpt: … it is clear that it is a filmed play, which in itself is not a bad thing given the caliber of the performances.

Phone Call From a Stranger

Kristen Lopez @ Journeys in Classic Film

Rise of the Planet of the Apes

Blake Howard @ Graffiti With Punctuation

The Shanghai Gesture

Roderick Heath @ Ferdy on Films

  • Excerpt: Sternberg’s time and place is not the real Shanghai of the 1930s, but his imagination’s conjured nexus of mystique and depravity.

Son of the Bride

Carlos del Río @ El rincón de Carlos del Río [Spanish]

  • Excerpt: El hijo de la novia es una película preciosa, divertida y encantadora.

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