Classics and Other Films on DVD

Here are our latest reviews of films on DVD from 2010 and earlier.

Anne of the Indies

Dennis Schwartz @ Dennis Schwartz Movie Reviews

L’ Argent (1928)

Dennis Schwartz @ Dennis Schwartz Movie Reviews

Bedeveilled

Peter Nellhaus @ Coffee Coffee and more Coffee

Before Sunset

Tim Brayton @ Antagony & Ecstasy

  • Excerpt: A stone-cold masterpiece.

Bird of Paradise

Jamie S. Rich @ DVD Talk

  • Excerpt: Bird of Paradise is a product of its time (as opposed to being timeless), and though much of King Vidor’s island romance seems passé now, the movie still works as an action/adventure love story if you can get in the right mindset and look past its stereotypes and naiveté.

Black Sunday

Jamie S. Rich @ DVD Talk

The Bloodthirsty Doll

Peter Nellhaus @ Coffee Coffee and more Coffee

  • Excerpt: The Bloodthirsty Doll should be of interest in the transfer of the vampire genre to Japan.

Brick

Jean-François Vandeuren @ Panorama-cinema.com [French]

The Brothers Bloom

Jean-François Vandeuren @ Panorama-cinema.com [French]

Casablanca

Rick Aragon @ Rick’s Cafe Texan

  • Excerpt: Casablanca has achieved such a legendary status as this Icon of Film one sometimes is afraid to approach it as just good entertainment. However, one can easily forget “The Legend” and enjoy a film that has romance, drama, some action, and even a bit of comedy.

The Chosen (1981)

Dennis Schwartz @ Dennis Schwartz Movie Reviews

Cinderella

Luke Bonanno @ DVDizzy.com

  • Excerpt: It doesn’t offer the innovation and experimentation of Fantasia, the artistry of Pinocchio and Sleeping Beauty, the emotion of Bambi and Dumbo, the fun of The Jungle Book and The Little Mermaid. What Cinderella does offer is a signature Disney fairy tale: a straight, simple narrative padded with animal antics and music.

Jamie S. Rich @ DVD Talk

Die Another Day

Rick Aragon @ Rick’s Cafe Texan

  • Excerpt: Poor Madge. Poor sweet delusional Madge. She thought she was going to WIN the Best Original Song Oscar for her robotic, auto-tuned rendition of the title theme.

Eating Raoul

Jamie S. Rich @ Criterion Confessions

For Criterion Consideration: Don’t Look Now

Joshua Brunsting @ CriterionCast

GoldenEye

Tim Brayton @ Antagony & Ecstasy

  • Excerpt: A smash hit that brought Bond back to life in a great big enjoyable way.

He Knows You’re Alone

A.J. Hakari @ CineSlice

The House of Clocks

A.J. Hakari @ CineSlice

Lawrence of Arabia

Jim Dixon @ Examiner.com

  • Excerpt: It isn’t just that you appreciate the epic scale and physical grandeur better on the big screen, though you do. But the subtle nuances of this four hour epic are all but completely lost on the big screen.

Monkey Shines

A.J. Hakari @ CineSlice

Mother (1996)

Dennis Schwartz @ Dennis Schwartz Movie Reviews

Mystery Men

Betty Jo Tucker @ ReelTalk Movie Reviews

Native Son

Donald Levit @ ReelTalk Movie Reviews

Pocahontas II: Journey to a New World

Tim Brayton @ Antagony & Ecstasy

  • Excerpt: The film’s history lesson is too ludicrous to view as anything but comedy.

Spookies

A.J. Hakari @ CineSlice

Star Trek

Stephen Carty @ Flix Capacitor

Sweet Movie

Gregory J. Smalley @ 366 Weird Movies

  • Excerpt: The most likely effect of the movie on an audience is to reaffirm their bourgeois proprieties: yeah, those taboos against coprophagia, the sexualization of children, and the random insertion of pointless, pretentious political musings into movies are pretty valid after all, aren’t they?

Three Days Of The Condor

Stephen Carty @ Flix Capacitor

Time After Time

Simon Miraudo @ Quickflix

Tristana

Dennis Schwartz @ Dennis Schwartz Movie Reviews

Twilight

Stephen Carty @ Flix Capacitor

Two Orphan Vampires

Gregory J. Smalley @ 366 Weird Movies

  • Excerpt: Two Orphan Vampires is slow, cheap, badly dubbed, and the vampire-vision blue filters get old, true, but there is an almost endearing strangeness and obsessiveness to the movie’s eccentric conceptions. Unfortunately, it goes on too long and wears out its welcome even for those who are attuned to this director’s plodding style, making it yet another of Rollin’s noble failures.

Women of the Night

Jamie S. Rich @ Criterion Confessions

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