Category Archives: Uncategorized

Reviews: The Invisible Man (2020)

Here are review links for this film submitted by our members:

  • Rick Aragon @ Rick’s Texan Reviews
    • Excerpt: The newest adaptation of the H.G. Wells’ novel works on nearly all levels but does not quite land the ending.
  • Laura Clifford @ Reeling Reviews
    • Excerpt: Leigh Whannell aces adapting H.G. Wells’ nineteenth century novel for the modern #MeToo age as a paranoid thriller, low budget effects à la “Paranormal Activity” effecting big chills, Elizabeth Moss excelling as a woman with only herself to turn to.
  • Karl Delossantos @ Smash Cut Reviews
  • Herman Dhaliwal @ Cinema Sanctum
    • Excerpt: Even when the film reaches certian places that feels contrived or silly, you’re still invested in the characters, you’re still compelled by the narrative, and you’re still thrilled by the set pieces. It’s thoughtful, slick, fun, and delivers everything you’d want in a crowd-pleaser horror film.
  • M Enois Duarte @ High-Def Digest.com
    • Excerpt: Leigh Whannell’s psychological thriller The Invisible Man is a modernized retelling of H.G. Wells’s 1897 sci-fi classic, a parable for the #MeToo movement featuring a remarkably powerful performance by Elisabeth Moss.
  • James Jay Edwards @ The Big Smoke America
  • Sarah Gopaul @ Digital Journal
    • Excerpt: ‘The Invisible Man’ is a terrifying update to the classic Universal horror narrative, creating an intense atmosphere that keeps viewers on the edge of their seats as they search for what can’t be seen.
  • Mark Hobin @ Fast Film Reviews
    • Excerpt: It has been a while since such a well crafted crafted opening scene grabbed my attention so quickly.
  • Brent McKnight @ Giant Freakin’ Robot
    • Excerpt: Harrowing and resourceful, using ingenuity and imagination rather than unlimited funds, Leigh Whannell skillfully constructs a tight, terrifying horror film.
  • Simon Miraudo @ Student Edge
    • Excerpt: Wanna see a magic trick? Because writer-director Leigh Whannell, screenwriter of Saw, has evolved into a proper illusionist with his old school yet radical retelling of The Invisible Man.
  • Jared Mobarak @ JaredMobarak.com
    • Excerpt: The fight choreography and special effects are flawless, but they’re nothing but aesthetic bells and whistles without Moss giving them substantive purpose via her performance.
  • Aaron Neuwirth @ We Live Entertainment
    • Excerpt: The Invisible Man has done well to reveal some positive light on this dark universe.
  • Eddie Pasa @ Gunaxin
    • Excerpt: An unexpected masterpiece from writer/director Leigh Whannell.
  • Joao Pinto @ Portal Cinema [Portuguese]
    • Excerpt: Elsabeth Moss is Amazing!
  • Shelagh Rowan-Legg @ ScreenAnarchy
    • Excerpt: Whannell keeps the audience on the seat’s edge in fear and anticipation, desperately searching for the monster that hides in plain sight.
  • [New] | Amir Siregar @ Amir at the Movies [Indonesian]
    • Excerpt: With fantastic lead performance from Elisabeth Moss, Leigh Whannell’s ‘The Invisible Man’ is a smartly-crafted thriller that delivers knockout and will leave you absolutely breathless.
  • Andrew Wyatt @ The Lens

Reviews: VFW (2020)

Here are review links for this film submitted by our members:

  • [New] | Herman Dhaliwal @ Cinema Sanctum
    • Excerpt: What you want from a film like VFW – the kills, the gore, the style, it totally delivers without wasting an ounce of your time, but but one element the film surprisingly nails is the dynamic between the characters, and how they connect with us.
  • Mike McGranaghan @ The Aisle Seat
    • Excerpt: Satisfyingly bloody and wickedly funny.
  • Brent McKnight @ The Last Thing I See
    • Excerpt: Joe Begos’ VFW feels like it crawled out of a grimy, urine-soaked 1980s gutter. And I mean that in the best possible way.
  • Jared Mobarak @ The Film Stage
    • Excerpt: Marry that carnage with performances hinged upon authenticity specifically because of what kind of film this is rather than despite it and you’re in for an entertaining treat.
  • [New] | Dennis Schwartz @ Dennis Schwartz Reviews
    • Excerpt: The gory retro exploitation film is just plain moronic.

Reviews: The Call of the Wild (2020)

Here are review links for this film submitted by our members:

  • Rick Aragon @ Rick’s Texan Reviews
    • Excerpt: The most I can say about The Call of the Wild is that it is “acceptable”. I found it neither thrilling or terrible but pleasant enough.
  • Frederic and Mary Ann Brussat @ Spirituality & Practice
    • Excerpt: A rousing adaptation of Jack London’s exciting tale of a man and a dog’s search for a true home in the Yukon.
  • Laura Clifford @ Reeling Reviews
    • Excerpt: It is telling that an animation director…was attached to this property as its star, Buck, rarely fools the eye into believing that one is watching a real dog… this “The Call of the Wild” works well enough as the kid-friendly version.
  • Herman Dhaliwal @ Cinema Sanctum
    • Excerpt: Despite some occasionaly strange and jarring choices, the film proves itself to be quite endearing, especially with Harrison Ford’s performance.
  • MaryAnn Johanson @ FlickFilosopher.com
    • Excerpt: An old-fashioned kiddie adventure, sweetly earnest, equal parts scary, funny, exciting, sad, and happy, with only a bit of uncanny valley in its CGI doggo star. Definitely had something in my eye.
  • Dan Lybarger @ Arkansas Democrat-Gazette
    • Excerpt: When Buck makes leaps that make one wonder if he’s really from Krypton instead of California, it requires a suspension of disbelief that might challenge Clark Kent.
  • Nell Minow @ rogerebert.com
    • Excerpt: The problem is less the technology, which is very impressive, than it is the uneven storyline, which zigzags from slapstick to poignance to action.
  • Eddie Pasa @ Gunaxin
    • Excerpt: By not making Buck – a computer-animated dog – a cutesy ham with a celebrity voiceover, the film pushes us out of our Disneyfied comfort zone and forces us to accept that it is truly Buck’s story. It is in this endeavor that The Call of the Wild deserves to be lauded.
  • [New] | Amir Siregar @ Amir at the Movies [Indonesian]
    • Excerpt: With its epic scale, beautiful cinematography and the presence of Harrison Ford, Chris Sanders’ ‘The Call of the Wild’ is a heartwarming, competent new take on the classic tale.

Reviews: The Assistant (2020)

Here are review links for this film submitted by our members:

  • Sarah Boslaugh @ TheArtsSTL
    • Excerpt: It takes a village to protect a predator.
  • Laura Clifford @ Reeling Reviews
    • Excerpt: One of the smart things about Green’s screenplay and direction is its quiet subtlety. There is no one big moment here, nor an outright smoking gun, instead a steady build of small injustices…
  • Candice Frederick @ The Wrap
  • Sarah Gopaul @ Digital Journal
    • Excerpt: ‘The Assistant’ is a real-life horror docudrama portraying a young woman made to feel helpless to stop the daily abuses of power she witnesses.
  • MaryAnn Johanson @ FlickFilosopher.com
    • Excerpt: A quietly brutal film that shows the dark underbelly of an industry — of a world — dominated by often predatory straight white men. Could be an eye-opener on a larger scale… if only we listen.
  • Charlie Juhl @
    • Excerpt: The Assistant stares at a recent college grad’s first real-world moral dilemma – what will you do when your black and white ethics lessons confront the gray areas of innuendo, the behavior of powerful men, and the inevitability of personal consequences should you challenge the system.
  • Jared Mobarak @ JaredMobarak.com
    • Excerpt: Green wants us to experience the silent prison of knowing the truth and being helpless against it. A palpable, tense drama exists beyond the mundane day-to-day of all victims.
  • Frank Ochieng @ The Critical Movie Critics
    • Excerpt: Solidly telling in its methodical truth, Green’s film is unassumingly dazzling in its low-key observations. The Assistant is impressively potent without the overstated exclamation of acrimony.
  • Rene Sanchez @ Cine Sin Fronteras [Spanish]
    • Excerpt: The Assistant es todo lo que Bombshell pretendía ser, pero sin la necesidad de recurrir a un gran reparto, a la magia del maquillaje o a un tono ligero para abordar una temática sumamente oportuna y sensible. Una mirada aséptica a la cultura tóxica que afecta al mundo laboral, y que encubre los abusos y las conductas inapropiadas de quienes se encuentran en una posición de poder.
  • [New] | Josh Taylor @ www.forgetfulfilmcritic.com
    • Excerpt: The film can work as a sort of litmus test. For a viewer who isn’t paying close attention, for one who doesn’t understand how a toxic work culture operates, one could think nothing that happens in the movie is all that disturbing. That’s the real horror of Green’s picture and what makes it so effective.

Reviews: The Lodge (2020)

Here are review links for this film submitted by our members:

  • Marco Albanese @ Stanze di Cinema [Italian]
  • Laura Clifford @ Reeling Reviews
    • Excerpt: …the film’s themes of Christian guilt don’t amount to much in the end, its climax more of a been-there, done-that deflation. “The Lodge” gets more mileage out of a creepy bowl of sea monkeys in a clear case of style over substance.
  • Karl Delossantos @
  • Herman Dhaliwal @ Cinema Sanctum
    • Excerpt: The filmmakers know how to set a mood, and while the story is engaging in the moment, especially with Riley Keough’s performance, it doesn’t have much lasting impact.
  • Sarah Gopaul @ Digital Journal
    • Excerpt: ‘The Lodge’ is a chilling thriller that tests a family’s sanity when they’re stranded in a snowstorm with no supplies and someone with malicious intent.
  • [New] | Mark Hobin @ Fast Film Reviews
    • Excerpt: When horror movies appeal to our psychological fears, they can be fascinating.
  • MaryAnn Johanson @ FlickFilosopher.com
    • Excerpt: This exasperating movie is so obnoxious it could be deliberately trolling us. Wants to have its ambiguous cake and eat it, too, smothered in a gloomy frosting. *extremely pinches nose in despair*
  • Mike McGranaghan @ The Aisle Seat
    • Excerpt: See this movie and prepare for it to mess you up.
  • Brent McKnight @ The Last Thing I See
    • Excerpt: I imagine becoming a stepparent is difficult. Especially when the kids hate you, you’re snowed in alone at a remote cabin, and you’re the lone survivor of a doomsday cult.
  • Jared Mobarak @ JaredMobarak.com
    • Excerpt: It’s less about leading us down one road to pull the rug and expose a second than carefully traversing multiple forks in tandem to show how they can all be true simultaneously.
  • Aaron Neuwirth @ We Live Entertainment
    • Excerpt: It’s a shame the film ultimately has little else to offer beyond its slow-burn eeriness and psychological chills.
  • Matt Oakes @
    • Excerpt: Led by a strikingly gloomy performance from Riley Keough, ‘The Lodge’ uses the power of psychological warfare and brutal natural elements to spook up a dark cabin fever horror story that refuses to let up.

Reviews: Downhill (2020)

Here are review links for this film submitted by our members:

  • Kyle Anderson @ Nerdist
  • Laura Clifford @ Reeling Reviews
    • Excerpt: What was left ambiguous and threatening in the original here is flatly stated or weakly joked upon, like this film’s literal dumping of its ending.
  • Herman Dhaliwal @ Cinema Sanctum
    • Excerpt: Downhill is a perfectly serviceable film, especially due to the performances from Will Ferrell and Julia Louis-Dreyfus, but you are ultimately better off watching the original.
  • [New] | Mark Hobin @ Fast Film Reviews
    • Excerpt: A defense of this much maligned movie.
  • Frank Ochieng @ Flick Feast
    • Excerpt: The aptly entitled Downhill is a lackluster effort that dilutes the organic impishness of gifted comic performers in both Louis Dreyfus and Ferrell…an uninspired piece of snowbound sludge.
  • Rene Sanchez @ Cine Sin Fronteras [Spanish]
    • Excerpt: Downhill es una comedia blanda e irregular que a pesar de contar con actuaciones admirables y de llevarnos por nuevos territorios que la original Force Majeure no exploró, termina por sentirse incompleta e inconsecuente.

Reviews: The Photograph (2020)

Here are review links for this film submitted by our members:

  • Laura Clifford @ Reeling Reviews
    • Excerpt: …quiet and pensive with an undertow of melancholic regret and a light topping of comic relief all set to Robert Glasper’s elegant jazz score. Issa Rae and Lakeith Stanfield create a tentative romance, its unspoken emotions simmering into a full boil.
  • Candice Frederick @ The Wrap
  • [New] | Mark Hobin @ Fast Film Reviews
    • Excerpt: A romance built upon a foundation of wistful stares and longing looks.
  • MaryAnn Johanson @ FlickFilosopher.com
    • Excerpt: It’s meet-melancholy in an elegant, female-gazey romantic drama audaciously mingling past and present. A swanky celebration of confident, complex women and the bittersweetness of adult relationships.

Reviews: Sonic the Hedgehog (2020)

Here are review links for this film submitted by our members:

Reviews: Birds of Prey (2020)

Here are review links for this film submitted by our members:

Reviews: 2020 Oscar Nominated Shorts (2020)

Here are review links for this film submitted by our members:

  • [New] | Rick Aragon @ Rick’s Texan Reviews [Animated]
    • Excerpt: Of the five nominated Animated Short Film there really isn’t a bad one in the bunch in terms of animation.
  • [New] | Rick Aragon @ Rick’s Texan Reviews [Documentary]
    • Excerpt: Unlike last year, the Best Documentary Short Film nominees are not a collection of misery with only one having any sense of hope. Each of them is an exception film, well-crafted and I think worthy of recognition.
  • [New] | Rick Aragon @ Rick’s Texan Reviews [Live Action]
    • Excerpt: The five nominated Live Action Short Films are all quite good, with Saria being the weakest of the bunch.
  • Laura Clifford @ Reeling Reviews [Animated]
    • Excerpt: The Czech Republic’s Daria Kashcheeva’s stop motion puppet animation is the first of three stop motion animations to be nominated, each using a different medium… This is my pick for the Oscar.
  • Laura Clifford @ Reeling Reviews [Documentary]
    • Excerpt: Dysinger’s uplifting look at how women are finding poor young girls in Kabul and giving them…courage and confidence by teaching them how to skateboard, Is an infectious and uplifting work which I’m betting will take the Oscar.
  • Laura Clifford @ Reeling Reviews [Live Action]
    • Excerpt: Tunisia is the setting for two of this year’s Live Action shorts in film, one a searing drama beneath the shadow of ISIS, the other a comedy involving a mule listening to the wrong music…
  • Mark Hobin @ Fast Film Reviews [Documentary]
    • Excerpt: Features Oscar winner “Learning to Skateboard in a Warzone (If You’re a Girl).”
  • Mark Hobin @ Fast Film Reviews [Live Action]
    • Excerpt: Let’s hear it for Tunisia! The North African country actually figures in two out of the five films nominated in 2020.
  • Mark Hobin @ Fast Film Reviews [Animation]
    • Excerpt: This year’s animated shorts are about the connections that form a family.
  • MaryAnn Johanson @ FlickFilosopher.com [Animated]
    • Excerpt: My pick: I haven’t seen a short film this year that is as full of pure joy as “Hair Love.” I’d like to think that its sweet positivity will be the thing that, at this awful moment, gives it an edge.
  • MaryAnn Johanson @ FlickFilosopher.com [Documentary]
    • Excerpt: My pick: “Learning to Skateboard in a Warzone (If You’re a Girl),” a tremendous ode to the power of sports to boost girls’ self-esteem and set them free from the shackles of the limited expectations.
  • MaryAnn Johanson @ FlickFilosopher.com [Live Action]
    • Excerpt: My pick: The gorgeous “Brotherhood” opens up reductive notions of Middle Eastern cultures in the Western imagination while telling a moving story of family and forgiveness that is quite universal.
  • Charlie Juhl @
    • Excerpt: This year’s Doc Short nominees share common themes even though they range from skateboarding girls in Afghanistan to the South Korean ferry disaster and even a Ferguson, Missouri state legislator.
  • Wesley Lovell @ Cinema Sight
  • Michael Ward @ Should I See It [Animation]
    • Excerpt: All masterfully made, this year’s Oscar nominated Animated Short Films address emotional topics and issues that bridge the gap between fantasy and reality.
  • Michael Ward @ Should I See It [Documentary]
    • Excerpt: Tissues at the ready, this year’s slate of Oscar nominated Documentary Short Subject films are important, topical works of impassioned conviction that are hard to shake and ride a rollercoaster of emotions.
  • Michael Ward @ Should I See It [Live Action]
    • Excerpt: This year’s Oscar nominees for Best Live Action Short Film represent stories told from around the world, but all unify around the power of human interaction, no matter your age or where you come from.