Category Archives: 2021 Films

Reviews: Wrath of Man (2021)

Here are review links for this film submitted by our members:

  • [New] | Charlie Juhl @ Citizen Charlie
    • Excerpt: Guy Ritchie may have found a special connection to the material and dreamed up an innovative way to bring it to life, but the world needs him on The Gentlemen, it needs him on Snatch. Let a lesser talent pick the lower-hanging fruit.
  • [New] | Brent McKnight @ The Last Thing I See
    • Excerpt: It’s dumb and empty and mean, and not particularly memorable, except for the odd flourishes that make moments stand out.
  • [New] | Eddie Pasa @ DC Filmdom

Reviews: Barb and Star Go to Vista Del Mar (2021)

Here are review links for this film submitted by our members:

  • Mark Hobin @ Fast Film Reviews
    • Excerpt: A stoner comedy that has nothing to do with drugs. These gals are high on life. My review:
  • Lee Jutton @ Film Inquiry
    • Excerpt: A wild and wacky comedy with bold splashes of the fantastical — including a murder plot involving mosquitos — Barb and Star Go to Vista Del Mar is the vacation from reality we all need and deserve.
  • Sarah Marrs @ LaineyGossip.com
    • Excerpt: An instant comedy classic.
  • [New] | Josh Taylor @ The Forgetful Film Critic
    • Excerpt: Barb and Star is a silly and hilarious breath of fresh air. It’s the number one “forget your troubles for two hours” movie of 2021.
  • Matthew Turner @ Nerdly.co.uk
    • Excerpt: This isn’t going to appeal to everyone, but if you’re prepared to surrender to the silliness, you’ll find yourself goofily grinning from ear to ear, even if it’s against your better judgment.

Reviews: In the Earth (2021)

Here are review links for this film submitted by our members:

  • Kyle Anderson @ Nerdist
  • Laura Clifford @ Reeling Reviews
    • Excerpt: …Ben Wheatley gets back to his literal roots with a trippy horror outing that suggests the psychedelia of of both “Mandy” and his own “A Field in England” with the urban legend of the Blair Witch and the folkloric horrors of “Midsommer.”
  • Jared Mobarak @ JaredMobarak.com
    • Excerpt: We find our own interpretations in a fluid state of metamorphosis much like the imagery on-screen courtesy of Wheatley’s hallucinogenic editing & Clint Mansell’s synth score.
  • Matt Oakes @
    • Excerpt: Ben Wheatley’s return to horror uses the backdrop of a global pandemic to spin a folksy yarn about woodland killers and pagan worship that employs militant audio-visual hallucinogenic effects to entertain and disorient. A real return to form for Wheatley and the first movie to effectively tackle the virus and its effect on our collective sanity.
  • [New] | Gregory J. Smalley @ 366 Weird Movies
    • Excerpt: In the Earth’ isn’t entirely new ground for Ben Wheatley, but it taps into the zeitgeist and delivers its payload of cosmic/folk/body/WTF horror with spiffy efficiency.

Reviews: Jakob’s Wife (2021)

Here are review links for this film submitted by our members:

  • Herman Dhaliwal @ Cinema Sanctum
    • Excerpt: Travis Stevens explores vampirism in a refreshing way thanks to clever writing and a committed performance from Barbara Crampton.
  • Mike McGranaghan @ The Aisle Seat
    • Excerpt: Jakob’s Wife is freaky, gory, darkly funny, and, best of all, substantive.
  • Brent McKnight @ The Last Thing I See
    • Excerpt: Jakob’s Wife has it all. Barbara Crampton. Larry Fessenden. Priests. Vampires. Rats. Splatter. The line, “I’m going to tongue fuck a hole in your neck until I puke blood.” Concrete Blonde.
  • [New] | Jared Mobarak @ The Film Stage
    • Excerpt: What we get is therefore fun, but rarely as deep as was possible. And fun is enough as long as you know that’s all you’re getting.
  • C.H. Newell @ Father Son Holy Gore
    • Excerpt: Jakob’s Wife is all about power: who has it, who wants it, and what they do with it when they get it.
  • Matt Oakes @
    • Excerpt: ‘JAKOB’S WIFE’ is a total vamp-camp gas with a laugh-out-loud script that’s executed to soul-sucking perfection by the combination of Barbara Crampton and Larry Fessenden. Bloody, fun, and shamelessly ridiculous, Travis Stevens has made a gleeful tribute to vampire’s enduring legacy in the horror genre and highlighted why they make for sure good comedy.

Reviews: Mortal Kombat (2021)

Here are review links for this film submitted by our members:

  • [New] | Andrea Chase @ KillerMovieReviews.com
    • Excerpt: Alas, this entrails-spilling excursion does little beyond warning us about the long-term dangers of sending a vengeful someone to Hell (or Netherrealm) and not trusting one’s instincts about someone who is so obviously awful.
  • Herman Dhaliwal @ Cinema Sanctum
    • Excerpt: There is some fun to be had. However, it seems far more interested in delivering fan service than telling a cohesive and engaging story.
  • [New] | Mark Hobin @ Fast Film Reviews
    • Excerpt: No surprise that fans have warmly embraced this picture with enthusiasm and glee.
  • Charlie Juhl @ Citizen Charlie
    • Excerpt: This would be a kick-ass franchise if any studio ever stopped to take it seriously for once
  • Eddie Pasa @ DC Filmdom
    • Excerpt: This iteration of Mortal Kombat finally features the gore its fans have been clamoring for since the early ’90s, but like the 1995 film, there’s not much in between the fight scenes.
  • Sebastian Zavala @ MasGamers [Spanish]
    • Excerpt: A workmanlike adaptation. Bloodily entertaining, but sometimes klumsy and bland. After 25 years of accumulated prospects, I expected a little more.

Reviews: Together Together (2021)

Here are review links for this film submitted by our members:

  • Laura Clifford @ Reeling Reviews
    • Excerpt: [Beckwith]’s written some amusing dialogue and cast charismatic leads (along with one killer supporting performance from Sufe Bradshaw of HBO’s ‘Veep’), but once she introduces her plot obstacle, the film gets mired in formula.
  • [New] | Jared Mobarak @ JaredMobarak.com
    • Excerpt: Together Together’s ultimate achievement is thus not to flip gender roles, but to erase them altogether [in order to create] a love that lasts.

Reviews: Honeydew (2021)

Here are review links for this film submitted by our members:

  • Herman Dhaliwal @ Cinema Sanctum
    • Excerpt: Devereux Milburn brings enough interesting stylistic touches and off-kilter vibes to keep an otherwise familiar setup engaging and creepy.
  • Brent McKnight @ The Last Thing I See
    • Excerpt: No movie about backwoods cannibals should be this dull.
  • [New] | Jared Mobarak @ The Film Stage
    • Excerpt: Milburn writes so much foreplay that the script’s eventual release is but a whimper.
  • C.H. Newell @ Father Son Holy Gore
    • Excerpt: Honeydew digs into serious subject matter like the horrifying effects of religious patriarchy, as well as the existential and bodily terror of heteronormativity.
  • Matt Oakes @
    • Excerpt: Old farm people are supposedly scary as sin in Devereux Milburn’s hostage-horror film ‘Honeydew’, a debut handicapped by lacking performances and an unjustifiably elongated runtime that fails to offer much novelty to the subgenre of young city folk kidnapped by malevolent bumpkins.
  • Gregory J. Smalley @
    • Excerpt: When ‘Honeydew’ is on, it’s creepy as hell. But when it’s off, it’s a case of ‘yeah, I totally saw that coming.’

Reviews: 2020 Oscar Nominated Shorts (2021)

Here are review links for this film submitted by our members:

  • Laura Clifford @ Reeling Reviews [Animated]
    • Excerpt: The Oscar nominated short animations comprise the most diverse program of the three featuring the obligatory Disney selection, a charming lesson for kids, to an experimental rumination of city life from France, off-beat humor from Iceland, a damning expression of grief and a mind-blowing history of the entire world told in nine minutes.
  • Laura Clifford @ Reeling Reviews [Documentary]
    • Excerpt: The short subject documentaries cover a wide range of subjects this year, three reaching into the past while addressing contemporary issues.
  • Laura Clifford @ Reeling Reviews [Live Action]
    • Excerpt: The nominated short Live Action films all find a unique perspective to explore their themes. It is of note that the only two films not from the U.S. happen to be from Israel and Palestine.
  • Mark Hobin @ Fast Film Reviews [Animated]
    • Excerpt: With one notable exception, this animation program is not for kids.
  • Mark Hobin @ Fast Film Reviews [Documentary]
    • Excerpt: I appreciated these all more or less equally, so my ranking is somewhat arbitrary.
  • Mark Hobin @ Fast Film Reviews [Live Action]
    • Excerpt: Cops or prejudice or a combination of the two are the connective themes that unite the majority of this year’s nominees.
  • [New] | MaryAnn Johanson @ FlickFilosopher.com [Documentary]
    • Excerpt: “Hunger Ward,” an unvarnished vérité look at starving Yemeni children and the medics trying to save them, best encapsulates the human experience of pain and resilience that all the nominees embody.
  • [New] | MaryAnn Johanson @ FlickFilosopher.com [Animated]
    • Excerpt: The brilliantly unsettling “Two Distant Strangers” is not only the most important of the nominees but one of the movies of the year, of any length. Its surprises are more brutal than mere plot twists.
  • MaryAnn Johanson @ FlickFilosopher.com [Animated]
    • Excerpt: I don’t see how the astonishing “Opera,” by Erick Oh, doesn’t win the Oscar for Best Animated Short. This is a stupendous achievement, a cartoon clockwork depicting life, the universe, and everything.
  • Wesley Lovell @ Cinema Sight [All]

Reviews: Voyagers (2021)

Here are review links for this film submitted by our members:

  • [New] | Rick Aragon @ Rick’s Texan Reviews
    • Excerpt: Voyagers is passable fare but a bit frustrating in how it could have been more.
  • Andrea Chase @ KillerMovieReviews.com
    • Excerpt: at best, a moribund Kubrick redux meets The Lord of the Flies. It confuses slow pacing with gravitas, and whispered dialogue with profundity.
  • [New] | Matt Oakes @
    • Excerpt: A teenaged crew of astronauts grows up on a mission to a new Earth in ‘Voyagers’ but the journey can be a rocky one. There’s philosophical intrigue about the ethics of control but it’s left by the wayside to focus on middling teenage angst and murderous power struggles. As a purely commercial vehicle though, ‘Voyagers’ remains a competent vessel for flighty entertainment.

Reviews: The Unholy (2021)

Here are review links for this film submitted by our members: