All posts by Governing Committee

Classics & More on DVD (Nov. 10, 2020)

Here are our latest reviews of films on DVD.

Pre-2018 Film Reviews

Fleshpot on 42nd Street

Dennis Schwartz @ Dennis Schwartz Reviews (1973)

  • Excerpt: Not a mainstream Hollywood film that comes with a happy ending.

Her

Wesley Lovell @ Cinema Sight (2013)

From Our Members’ Desks (Nov. 9, 2020)

OFCS members don’t just write film reviews. Here are several articles you might find interesting.

Best of Lists

5 Favorites #52: Favorite Horror Films, Part 3

Wesley Lovell @ Cinema Sight

5 Favorites Redux #53: Focus Features Films

Wesley Lovell @ Cinema Sight

Festivals: Individual Reviews

Festival du nouveau cinéma – Apples / Undine

C.H. Newell @ Father Son Holy Gore

  • Excerpt: Apples and Undine are two painfully relevant films in 2020: one about a pandemic, the other about a woman’s struggle against patriarchal myth.

I am Greta

Peter Nellhaus @ Coffee, Coffee and more Coffee

  • Excerpt: Setting aside the issues regarding climate change and any kind of agenda, I am Greta is also about the weight of celebrity.

NewFest 2020: Report 9

Sarah Boslaugh @ TheArtsSTL

  • Excerpt: Ben Anthony’s documentary Keith Haring: Street Art Boy offers a fresh and well-rounded look at Haring’s life and art, aided by unparalleled access to materials held by the Keith Haring Foundation.

Once Upon a Time in Venezuela

Peter Nellhaus @ Coffee, Coffee and more Coffee

Shiva Baby

Peter Nellhaus @ Coffee, Coffee and more Coffee

Spring Blossom

Peter Nellhaus @ Coffee, Coffee and more Coffee

Under the Open Sky

Peter Nellhaus @ Coffee, Coffee and more Coffee

  • Excerpt: Under the Open Sky is notable for the tour-de-force performance by Koji Yakusho. Even if the name is not immediately familiar, even those not following Japanese cinema would have seen Yakusho in Babel or Memoirs of a Geisha.

Undine

Peter Nellhaus @ Coffee, Coffee and more Coffee

  • Excerpt: The film stars Paula Beer and Franz Rogowski, the two main actors in Petzold’s Transit. For myself, Undine is more successful than the previous film, where I think the filmmaker’s imagined updating worked against the realities of the source novel.

Awards Coverage

Continue reading From Our Members’ Desks (Nov. 9, 2020)

This Week at the Movies (Nov. 6, 2020)

Here are some reviews of films coming out at the theater this week as well as others that may be in theaters or newly on home video.

Opening: Nov. 6, 2020

Wide (United States)

Let Him Go

For member reviews of this film, follow this link

Limited (United States)

The Dark and the Wicked

Laura Clifford @ Reeling Reviews

  • Excerpt: I’d go so far as to say Bertino’s is the better film [than “Relic”]…if it were not for his literal last second indulgence in a jump scare which undermines his theme of the bravery called upon by love.

The Dark and the Wicked

Herman Dhaliwal @ Cinema Sanctum

  • Excerpt: Despite some derivative theming, the film has enough unsettling imagery and oppresively atmospheric filmmaking to leave an impression.

The Dark and the Wicked

Brent McKnight @ The Last Thing I See

  • Excerpt: A creepy, visceral horror tale that sticks around in a deep, hidden place.

Kindred

Mike McGranaghan @ The Aisle Seat

  • Excerpt: Kindred is an uncommonly effective horror movie because 99% of the things that happen in it are completely realistic.

Koko-Di Koko-Da

Brent McKnight @ The Last Thing I See

  • Excerpt: Think ‘Groundhog Day’ but twisted, vicious, and heartbreaking.

2020 Films In Theaters Now In Select Areas

Continue reading This Week at the Movies (Nov. 6, 2020)

Reviews: Let Him Go (2020)

Here are review links for this film submitted by our members:

  • [New] | Rick Aragon @ Rick’s Texan Reviews
    • Excerpt: Grief, loss and bonds of family good and bad are the themes in Let Him Go, a sparse, quiet, moving film with three dynamic performances that push the film even higher.
  • Laura Clifford @ Reeling Reviews
    • Excerpt: …part old-fashioned Western, and, at its best, a slow burn senior relationship movie before it goes all “Devil’s Rejects” in a Dakota motel room at the beginning of its third act, its new fangled violent extremes at odds with its classicism.
  • Mike McGranaghan @ The Aisle Seat
    • Excerpt: I haven’t seen a more gripping movie in 2020.
  • [New] | Jared Mobarak @ JaredMobarak.com
    • Excerpt: This is western white hat versus black from start to finish, but also a bloody revenge thriller that’s unafraid of putting its heart front and center.

Classics & More on DVD (Nov. 3, 2020)

Here are our latest reviews of films on DVD.

Pre-2018 Film Reviews

From Hell It Came

Mark Leeper @ Mark Leeper’s Reviews (1957)

  • Excerpt: The idea of a tribal folklore monster coming to life would not be a bad one, but that is about the only thing that is good about this often genuinely incompetent film.

Nationtime

Sarah Boslaugh @ (1972)

  • Excerpt: Cinematographically, Nationtime is a fairly conventional television documentary, shot in black and white and featuring a voice of God narration read by Sidney Poitier, and mixing footage of featured speakers with shots of the sea of delegates gathered for the convention. It is innovative, however, in the way Greaves mixes poetry by Langston Hughes and Amiri Baraka, read by Harry Belafonte, just as the convention itself combined musical performances with speeches and political discussions.

The Tower

Wesley Lovell @ Cinema Sight (2013)

From Our Members’ Desks (Nov. 2, 2020)

OFCS members don’t just write film reviews. Here are several articles you might find interesting.

Interviews

Director Maïmouna Doucouré Was Inspired by Her Own Adolescence to Create Cuties

Candice Frederick @

Tony Todd on the Joy of ‘Candyman,’ and the Role of Black Horror

Candice Frederick @ New York Times

Festivals: General Coverage

NewFest 2020: Report 1

Sarah Boslaugh @

NewFest 2020: Report 2

Sarah Boslaugh @

NewFest 2020: Report 3

Sarah Boslaugh @

NewFest 2020: Report 4

Sarah Boslaugh @

NewFest 2020: Report 5

Sarah Boslaugh @

NewFest 2020: Report 6

Sarah Boslaugh @

NewFest 2020: Report 7

Sarah Boslaugh @

NewFest 2020: Report 8

Sarah Boslaugh @

Festivals: Individual Reviews

Ema

Peter Nellhaus @ Coffee, Coffee and more Coffee

  • Excerpt: Ema is basically a showcase for actress Mariana Di Girolamo. Ema is a force of nature who refuses to deal with anyone else other than her own terms.

Minari

Peter Nellhaus @ Coffee, Coffee and more Coffee

  • Excerpt: What is unexpected is that Chung’s film does not have the cliches one might expect in a story about Asian immigrants in America, especially in a region one might perceive of as less hospitable.

Thou Shalt Not Hate

Peter Nellhaus @ Coffee, Coffee and more Coffee

  • Excerpt: While (Mauro) Mancini admirably keeps any messaging from being heavy handed, he also errs in being a bit too cautious.

Wet Season

Peter Nellhaus @ Coffee, Coffee and more Coffee

Awards Coverage

Continue reading From Our Members’ Desks (Nov. 2, 2020)

This Week at the Movies (Oct. 30, 2020)

Here are some reviews of films coming out at the theater this week as well as others that may be in theaters or newly on home video.

Opening: Oct. 30, 2020

Wide (United States)

None

Limited (United States)

None

2020 Films In Theaters Now In Select Areas

Continue reading This Week at the Movies (Oct. 30, 2020)

Reviews: Borat Subsequent Moviefilm (2020)

Here are review links for this film submitted by our members:

  • Andrea Chase @ KillerMovieReviews.com
    • Excerpt: A Rabelaisian excursion into the absurd.
  • Laura Clifford @ Reeling Reviews
    • Excerpt: …while Mikael Pence is never reached, plenty of CPAC attendees barely glance at Cohen beneath his full KKK regalia and Rudy Giuliani, who thought he’d escaped being made a mockery of, is now being investigated for his (really disgusting) behavior…
  • Herman Dhaliwal @ Cinema Sanctum
    • Excerpt: Not as impactful as the first, but still incredibly funny. Maria Bakalova steals the show, delivering a brilliant and committed performance that led to some of the funniest moments.
  • [New] | James Jay Edwards @ The Big Smoke America
  • Mark Hobin @ Fast Film Reviews
    • Excerpt: A lot has changed since the first movie. More of the same isn’t enough.
  • MaryAnn Johanson @ FlickFilosopher.com
    • Excerpt: A work of breathtaking audacity. This is as perilous as comedy gets, and it’s very, very funny, often shockingly so. Sacha Baron Cohen’s scathing cultural strikes land like extinction-level asteroids.
  • Simon Miraudo @ Student Edge
    • Excerpt: Bad news: there’s a pandemic on. Good news: Borat’s back. It’s the trade no one would make, but it’s the one we’re living with.
  • Matt Oakes @
    • Excerpt: Sacha Baron Cohen brings Borat back from the grave to confront 2020 America in ‘Borat Subsequent Moviefilm’. The result is decidedly less iconic (and relies too heavily on scripted rather than unscripted material) but succeeds in delivering gut-busting laughs and Cohen’s brand of shock and awe comedy, while also moving the dial on what Cohen’s particular style of shockumentary is able to offer. Newcomer Maria Bakalova is a treasure.

Reviews: Love and Monsters (2020)

Here are review links for this film submitted by our members:

  • Herman Dhaliwal @ Cinema Sanctum
    • Excerpt: There’s a lot of fun to be had with this, from its humor to its engaging action sequences to the very charming and vulnerable lead performance from Dylan O’Brien.
  • MaryAnn Johanson @ FlickFilosopher.com
    • Excerpt: This pleasantly silly-sad apocalypse, melancholy with a dash of optimism, smashes clichés and finds fresh angles on the familiar. Dylan O’Brien has a self-deprecating charm; there’s a great dog, too.
  • Mike McGranaghan @ The Aisle Seat
    • Excerpt: Love and Monsters is the perfect movie if you can’t decide whether you want a romantic-comedy or a horror flick.
  • Jared Mobarak @ The Film Stage
    • Excerpt: Love and Monsters proves itself a pretty well rounded adventure for both its target audience and those older looking for a bit of escape that’s still firmly rooted in reality.
  • [New] | Dennis Schwartz @ Dennis Schwartz Reviews
    • Excerpt: It’s silly but with some depth thrown in.

Reviews: Synchronic (2020)

Here are review links for this film submitted by our members:

  • Herman Dhaliwal @ Cinema Sanctum
    • Excerpt: I wouldn’t consider it to be one of the better efforts of Justin Benson and Aaron Moorhead, but it still showcases a lot of the skill and creativity that made them such exciting filmmakers in the first place.
  • Brent McKnight @ The Last Thing I See
    • Excerpt: Ambitious and weird and unlike anything you’re likely to encounter anytime soon.
  • Jared Mobarak @ The Film Stage
    • Excerpt: Where I could forget the genre element in [previous films] to latch onto the people therein, the opposite proves true here. While still objectively enough, I [did want] more.
  • [New] | C.H. Newell @ Father Son Holy Gore
    • Excerpt: There could’ve been compelling arguments made in this film about how a Black man can’t escape racism from one era of history to another, but Synchronic never makes a lasting impression in this respect.
  • Matt Oakes @
    • Excerpt: Sci-fi indie filmmakers Justin Benson and Aaron Moorhead have done it again with the trippy, drug-fueled time travel experiment ‘Synchronic’, which benefits from a strong leading man and an arresting balance of body horror and temporal experimentation.
  • Eddi Pasa @ DC Filmdom
    • Excerpt: Synchronic is one of the best films of the year, another corker of a sci-fi thriller from writing/directing duo Aaron Moorhead and Justin Benson.
  • Dennis Schwartz @ Dennis Schwartz Reviews
    • Excerpt: Superficial.
  • Gregory J. Smalley @ 366 Weird Movies
    • Excerpt: The characters are likable, their situations dramatic and relatable, and they’re all set up for a speculative blast that will blow the hinges off. The problem is that when the sci-fi twist arrives, it’s basic and contrived, and not weird enough to compensate for its unbelievability.