Classics & More on DVD (Apr. 21, 2020)

Here are our latest reviews of films on DVD.

Pre-2018 Film Reviews

Anna Karenina

Rick Aragon @ Rick’s Texan Review (1948)

Cleopatra

Rick Aragon @ Rick’s Texan Reviews (1912)

Force Majeure

Rick Aragon @ Rick’s Texan Reviews (2014)

The Invisible Man

Rick Aragon @ Rick’s Texan Reviews (1933)

  • Excerpt: Menace and mirth mix merrily in The Invisible Man, and with a standout vocal performance by Claude Rains in his American film debut, The Invisible Man may not be frightening but moves quickly with special effects that still stand up.

Phantom Thread

Dragan Antulov @ Draxblog VI (2017) [Croatian]

Suffragette

Rick Aragon @ Rick’s Texan Reviews (2015)

Teorema

Roderick Heath @ This Island Rod (1968)

  • Excerpt: Teorema manages the unique trick of seeming both plain-spoken and reticent: it relies heavily on imagery to tell its story, even playing early on as a pastiche of silent cinema in black-and-white absent even title cards. Pasolini conveys his sexual roundelay whilst avoiding any direct depictions of carnality, not that such nimbleness stopped Italian authorities from trying to prosecute him for obscenity.

From Our Members’ Desks (Apr. 20, 2020)

OFCS members don’t just write film reviews. Here are several articles you might find interesting.

Best of Lists

5 Favorites Redux #24: Original Stage Musical Adaptations

Wesley Lovell @ Cinema Sight

Tributes

Luis Rainer: Oscar’s Beloved Outcast

Jerry Roberts @ Over-Thinking Oscar

  • Excerpt: In practical terms, you have to wonder if Rainer’s career would have been remembered so fondly if she hadn’t been such an oddity in Oscar’s scrapbook. To date, she remains the only actress in history to win two back to back Best Actress awards and she was the oldest living Oscar recipient.

Awards Coverage

Poll: Remaking Best Supporting Actres, 2012

Wesley Lovell @ Cinema Sight

Essays

Continue reading From Our Members’ Desks (Apr. 20, 2020)

This Week at the Movies (Apr. 17, 2020)

Here are some reviews of films coming out at the theater this week as well as others that may be in theaters or newly on home video.

Opening: Apr. 17, 2020

2020 Films In Theaters Now In Select Areas

Continue reading This Week at the Movies (Apr. 17, 2020)

Reviews: Butt Boy (2020)

Here are review links for this film submitted by our members:

  • [New] | Herman Dhaliwal @ Cinema Sanctum
    • Excerpt: It just is what it is, and what it is might definitely be a huge turn-off for most people. However, if you’re able to get into its weird wavelength, you will be immensely entertained by its commitment to the bit.
  • James Jay Edwards @ The Big Smoke America
  • Charlie Juhl @ Citizen Charlie
    • Excerpt: For what wants to be farce and satire, the filmmaking is earnest, the characters have depth and emotional conflicts, but you know, there is only so much one can do to avoid the hole…you know, the plot hole. What did you think I meant?
  • Brent McKnight @ The Last Thing I See
    • Excerpt: Yes, this movie is called ‘Butt Boy,’ but it’s not what you think. Okay, it’s kind of what you think.
  • Jared Mobarak @ The Film Stage
    • Excerpt: The final result is far from perfect, but the “you have to see it to believe it aspect” is a powerful enough selling point to render [that truth] inert.
  • Frank Ochieng @ Flick Feast
    • Excerpt: …about as cheeky as a quarantined outhouse. Painfully contrived and methodically doltish, Butt Boy strives for its validation of absurd fanny fun but this comedic crapper definitely needs its behind spanked.
  • Gregory J. Smalley @ 366 Weird Movies
    • Excerpt: …not for the meek. Then again, the meek probably won’t be streaming something titled ‘Butt Boy’ in the first place.

Reviews: Why Don’t You Just Die! (2020)

Here are review links for this film submitted by our members:

  • Laura Clifford @ Reeling Reviews
    • Excerpt: Writer/director/editor Kirill Sokolov’s splashy debut revels in comedic violence that plays like a live action Itchy and Scratchy cartoon with production design (by Viktor Zudin) that seems to have inspired last year’s “Beanpole”
  • Herman Dhaliwal @ Cinema Sanctum
    • Excerpt: Why Don’t You Just Die! is a ton of fun, and the kind of movie that begs to be seen with a bunch of rowdy friends looking to have a good time. It’s a stylishly crafted and ultraviolent splatterfest that keeps you guessing with each swerve that the story takes.
  • Brent McKnight @ The Last Thing I See
    • Excerpt: Mean, nasty, bloody, violent, funny, vicious, unexpected, twisted, vengeful…I don’t know, I’m trying to collect words that will make you want to watch the crazy new Russian action film Why Don’t You Just Die!. That’s my goal here, to get you to watch this damn movie.
  • Jared Mobarak @ The Film Stage
    • Excerpt: The film progresses with a high-octane energy that keeps us on our toes as people are thrown around like ragdolls whenever passion gets the better of thought.
  • [New] | Ronald wilkinson @ itsjustmovies.com
    • Excerpt: Does Tarentino almost better than Tarentino.

Reviews: Sorry We Missed You (2020)

Here are review links for this film submitted by our members:

Classics & More on DVD (Apr. 14, 2020)

Here are our latest reviews of films on DVD.

Pre-2018 Film Reviews

All About My Mother [Todo sobre mi madre]

Bavner Donaldo @ Cinejour (1999) [Indonesian]

Appointment in Bray

Dennis Schwartz @ Dennis Schwartz Reviews (1971)

  • Excerpt: A thought-provoking magical film.

Cat People

Sarah Boslaugh @ TheArtsSTL (1942)

  • Excerpt: Cat People is a psychological horror film, so don’t come expecting to see a woman transform to a CGI cat before your eyes. Instead, come for the subtlety and slow-creeping terror and Lewton’s patented combination of fantasy and psychology grounded in real human experience.

Executive Koala

Gregory J. Smalley @ 366 Weird Movies (2005)

  • Excerpt: There’s just something about casting a cute fuzzy mammal as the lead in your serial killer thriller that lets the audience know not to take anything too seriously, you know?

You Only Live Twice

Roderick Heath @ Film Freedonia (1967)

  • Excerpt: You Only Live Twice was also the first Bond film I ever saw and the one that made me a lifelong if sometimes hesitant aficionado, deeply fascinating me with its vivid, iconographic style, particularly the opening credits with their evocation of dreamlike romanticism and boiling natural force.

From Our Members’ Desks (Apr. 13, 2020)

OFCS members don’t just write film reviews. Here are several articles you might find interesting.

Best of Lists

5 Favorites Redux #23: Favorite Stage Adaptations

Wesley Lovell @ Cinema Sight

The Best Films of 2020 (So Far)

Candice Frederick @ Harper’s Bazaar

Interviews

Advocates for Democracy: Barak Goodman and Chris Durrance on “Slay the Dragon”

Nell Minow @ rogerebert.com

  • Excerpt: In an interview with RogerEbert.com the directors talked about being “advocates for democracy,” the power of social media in pushing back against dark money, and making the arcane, data-heavy story of gerrymandering accessible and cinematic.

After 60 Years in Hollywood, Glynn Turman Is Still Trying New Things

Candice Frederick @ Shondaland

Interview with Eliza Hittman about Never Rarely Sometimes Always

Nell Minow @ Alliance of Women Film Journalists

  • Excerpt: I think stories about teenagers are very universal. They can speak to a young audience, but it’s also very easy for an adult audience to watch them and look back and reflect and identify. So, I think that the films that I make specifically speak to young people, but also to an adult audience.

This Incredible, Unusual, Really Unique Sort of Hook: George Nolfi on The Banker

Nell Minow @ rogerebert.com

  • Excerpt: And we were both so amazed at what these guys accomplished, and we also felt like there was this incredible, unusual, really unique sort of hook where you reverse all the stereotypes and you have these two amazing African-American men, despite all the racism around them, My Fair Lady-ing, as it were, a white guy to be their front.

Awards Coverage

Continue reading From Our Members’ Desks (Apr. 13, 2020)

This Week at the Movies (Apr. 10, 2020)

Here are some reviews of films coming out at the theater this week as well as others that may be in theaters or newly on home video.

Opening: Apr. 10, 2020

Wide (United States)

None.

2020 Films In Theaters Now In Select Areas

Continue reading This Week at the Movies (Apr. 10, 2020)

Reviews: Never Rarely Sometimes Always (2020)

Here are review links for this film submitted by our members:

  • Kyle Anderson @ Nerdist
  • [New] | Frederic and Mary Ann Brussat @ SpiritualityandPractice.com
    • Excerpt: A deeply touching film that illustrates the healing power of empathy.
  • Laura Clifford @ Reeling Reviews
    • Excerpt: With her third film, writer/director Eliza Hittman (“Beach Rats”) has proven herself a real auteur, a filmmaker with the uncanny ability to project the inner turmoil of teenagers unable to voice it for themselves.
  • Herman Dhaliwal @ Cinema Sanctum
    • Excerpt: It’s Eliza Hittman’s most accomplished work yet. Her empathetic eye allows her to tackle a tough subject matter with so much compassion and sensitivity.
  • MaryAnn Johanson @ FlickFilosopher.com
    • Excerpt: Softly savage, exposing the unspoken subtext of the lives of girls and women: the mundane but covert garbage that gets piled upon us, the knotted existence too many of us are just barely surviving.
  • Charlie Juhl @ Citizen Charlie
    • Excerpt: It is all too believable there are thousands of Autumns out there and this is the shadowy world they must navigate due to a cacophony of decisions made by countless figures they will never meet.
  • Jared Mobarak @ JaredMobarak.com
    • Excerpt: It’s a devastating turn of events with potential to fall down much darker pathways than Hittman takes while also [spotlighting] how dark this authentic trail is on its own.
  • Frank Ochieng @ Flick Feast
    • Excerpt: Solidly acted and restrained in its thought-provoking resonance, Hittman’s quiet commentary on young female empowerment is tranquil and engaging in its message of disenchantment.
  • Dennis Schwartz @ Dennis Schwartz Reviews
    • Excerpt: Richly tells us how a teenager from the sticks deals with her unexpected pregnancy in this rewarding indie.
  • Josh Taylor @ www.forgetfulfilmcritic.com
    • Excerpt: In Never Rarely Sometimes Always, director Eliza Hittman focuses on a young girl with few options and little support while dealing with an unwanted pregnancy. The film is filled with grace and compassion; it’s a luminous example of humanism in art.

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