From Our Members’ Desks (Mar. 2, 2020)

OFCS members don’t just write film reviews. Here are several articles you might find interesting.

Best of Lists

5 Favorites Redux #17: The Films of Bill Nighy

Wesley Lovell @ Cinema Sight

Awards Coverage

93rd Oscars: Upcoming Precursors – March

Wesley Lovell @ Cinema Sight

Comments on the 1945 Retro Hugo Nominations in the Dramatic Presentation Category

Mark Leeper @ Mark Leeper’s Reviews

  • Excerpt: An overview of all the films eligible for the 1945 Retrospective Hugo Awards for Science Fiction and Fantasy

The Friday Face Off Round One #28

Wesley Lovell @ Cinema Sight

Oscar Preview: Weekend of Feb. 21-23, 2020

Wesley Lovell @ Cinema Sight

Video Essays, Video Reviews, Vlogs & More

Continue reading From Our Members’ Desks (Mar. 2, 2020)

This Week at the Movies (Feb. 28, 2020)

Here are some reviews of films coming out at the theater this week as well as others that may be in theaters or newly on home video.

Opening: Feb. 28, 2020

Wide (United States)

The Invisible Man

For member reviews of this film, follow this link

Limited (United States)

Blood on Her Name

Shelagh Rowan-Legg @ ScreenAnarchy

  • Excerpt: Blood on Her Name shows not only how most of us could never cope with a terrible crime, but how those already under the thumb of the system can likely never escape it.

Burden

Frederic and Mary Ann Brussat @ Spirituality & Practice

  • Excerpt: True story about a black Christian minister who practices love, forgiveness, and reconciliation by befriending a Ku Klux Klan member.

Burden

Laura Clifford @ Reeling Reviews

  • Excerpt: If only Heckler hadn’t weighted Mike’s attraction to Judy over the Reverend’s hard won influence, he could have made an end run on the oft-lamented ‘white savior movie’ with his black hero, but while the film has its flaws, it works more often than not, buoyed by good performances.

Disappearance at Clifton Hill

Shelagh Rowan-Legg @ ScreenAnarchy

  • Excerpt: Disappearance at Clifton Hill gives us a good thriller that (like most good thrillers) asks more questions that it answers, and shows us characters both stuck in place, going in circles, and struggling to get out.

Disappearance at Clifton Hill

Gregory J. Smalley @ 366 Weird Movies

  • Excerpt: Full of psychological unease rather than jump scares, Clifton Hill plays well within its budget. Superior writing elevates it from merely a ‘modest thriller’ to a ‘modest-but-clever thriller.’

Greed

Chris Barsanti @ Slant

  • Excerpt: The film takes occasional stabs at comic grotesquerie, but it’s brought back to earth by an insistent docudrama seriousness.

Greed

Laura Clifford @ Reeling Reviews

  • Excerpt: Winterbottom encouraged improvisation and Coogan, who has shown a scary affinity for portraying obnoxious gits (albeit highly entertaining one), summons Trump and his ilk… Call it “The Trip to the Roman Empire: The Road to Global Ruin.”

Guns Akimbo

Simon Miraudo @ Student Edge

  • Excerpt: It takes a flick like Guns Akimbo to make you stop and appreciate the craftsmanship and nuance of a motion picture like Crank.

2020 Films In Theaters Now In Select Areas

Continue reading This Week at the Movies (Feb. 28, 2020)

Reviews: The Night Clerk (2020)

Here are review links for this film submitted by our members:

Reviews: The Invisible Man (2020)

Here are review links for this film submitted by our members:

  • [New] | Rick Aragon @ Rick’s Texan Reviews
    • Excerpt: The newest adaptation of the H.G. Wells’ novel works on nearly all levels but does not quite land the ending.
  • Laura Clifford @ Reeling Reviews
    • Excerpt: Leigh Whannell aces adapting H.G. Wells’ nineteenth century novel for the modern #MeToo age as a paranoid thriller, low budget effects à la “Paranormal Activity” effecting big chills, Elizabeth Moss excelling as a woman with only herself to turn to.
  • Karl Delossantos @ Smash Cut Reviews
  • Herman Dhaliwal @ Cinema Sanctum
    • Excerpt: Even when the film reaches certian places that feels contrived or silly, you’re still invested in the characters, you’re still compelled by the narrative, and you’re still thrilled by the set pieces. It’s thoughtful, slick, fun, and delivers everything you’d want in a crowd-pleaser horror film.
  • James Jay Edwards @ The Big Smoke America
  • Sarah Gopaul @ Digital Journal
    • Excerpt: ‘The Invisible Man’ is a terrifying update to the classic Universal horror narrative, creating an intense atmosphere that keeps viewers on the edge of their seats as they search for what can’t be seen.
  • Brent McKnight @ Giant Freakin’ Robot
    • Excerpt: Harrowing and resourceful, using ingenuity and imagination rather than unlimited funds, Leigh Whannell skillfully constructs a tight, terrifying horror film.
  • Simon Miraudo @ Student Edge
    • Excerpt: Wanna see a magic trick? Because writer-director Leigh Whannell, screenwriter of Saw, has evolved into a proper illusionist with his old school yet radical retelling of The Invisible Man.
  • Jared Mobarak @ JaredMobarak.com
    • Excerpt: The fight choreography and special effects are flawless, but they’re nothing but aesthetic bells and whistles without Moss giving them substantive purpose via her performance.
  • Aaron Neuwirth @ We Live Entertainment
    • Excerpt: The Invisible Man has done well to reveal some positive light on this dark universe.
  • Eddie Pasa @ Gunaxin
    • Excerpt: An unexpected masterpiece from writer/director Leigh Whannell.
  • [New] | Joao Pinto @ Portal Cinema [Portuguese]
    • Excerpt: Elsabeth Moss is Amazing!
  • Shelagh Rowan-Legg @ ScreenAnarchy
    • Excerpt: Whannell keeps the audience on the seat’s edge in fear and anticipation, desperately searching for the monster that hides in plain sight.
  • Andrew Wyatt @ The Lens

Classics & More on DVD (Feb. 25, 2020)

Here are our latest reviews of films on DVD.

Pre-2018 Film Reviews

Münchhausen

Sarah Boslaugh @ TheArtsSTL (1943)

  • Excerpt: Báky and his UFA crew… iput their budget up on the screen—Münchhausen is a feast of spectacle and special effects.

From Our Members’ Desks (Feb. 24, 2020)

OFCS members don’t just write film reviews. Here are several articles you might find interesting.

Best of Lists

2019 Odds and Ends

Rick Aragon @ Rick’s Texan Reviews

  • Excerpt: Most Overrated 2019 Film: Blinded By the Light. Most Underrated 2019 Film: Ma

5 Favorites Redux #16: Favorite Harrison Ford Films

Wesley Lovell @ Cinema Sight

The Ten Best 2019 Films I Have Seen So Far

Rick Aragon @ Rick’s Texan Reviews

The Ten Worst 2019 Films I Have Seen So Far

Rick Aragon @ Rick’s Texan Reviews

Interviews

An Interview with Fredrica Bailey and Stefon Bristol On ‘See You Yesterday’

Candice Frederick @ Essence1

Festivals: Individual Reviews

The Father

Karl Delossantos @ Smash Cut Reviews

Awards Coverage

Continue reading From Our Members’ Desks (Feb. 24, 2020)

This Week at the Movies (Feb. 21, 2020)

Here are some reviews of films coming out at the theater this week as well as others that may be in theaters or newly on home video.

Opening: Feb. 21, 2020

Wide (United States)

The Call of the Wild

For member reviews of this film, follow this link

Limited (United States)

Emma.

Laura Clifford @ Reeling Reviews

  • Excerpt: Knightley’s introduction is altogether astonishing, the young man disheveled from a hard gallop stripped down completely before being redressed by his valet to walk to the Woodhouses’, a scene usually reserved for women and with far less nudity.

Emma.

MaryAnn Johanson @ FlickFilosopher.com

  • Excerpt: A sly, penetrating zing and a frisson of Insta-influencer horror — of the oppression of performative perfection against a marzipan backdrop — renders Austen’s fluff and nonsense deadly serious.

The Night Clerk

Rick Aragon @ Rick’s Cafe Texan

The Night Clerk

Herman Dhaliwal @ Cinema Sanctum

  • Excerpt: It’s a fascinating and fairly engaging film that is elevated by two strong lead performances in Tye Sheridan and Ana de Armas.

The Night Clerk

Jared Mobarak @ The Film Stage

  • Excerpt: Sheridan lends his role the necessary nuance it deserves and de Armas imbues hers with a wealth of unspoken pain, but neither effort receives its payoff.

Seberg

Laura Clifford @ Reeling Reviews

  • Excerpt: Screenwriters Joe Shrapnel & Anna Waterhouse turn poetic license into dubious fictionalization told with leaden dialogue frequently guilty of speechifying…weighing down Kristen Stewart’s delicate performance.

Seberg

MaryAnn Johanson @ FlickFilosopher.com

  • Excerpt: French New Wave icon Jean Seberg plays an unwitting game of cat-and-mouse with the FBI in a strangled blend of biopic and paranoid thriller. Not even always fascinating Kristen Stewart can save this.

2020 Films In Theaters Now In Select Areas

Continue reading This Week at the Movies (Feb. 21, 2020)

Reviews: The Cave (2019)

Here are review links for this film submitted by our members:

Reviews: The Two Popes (2019)

Here are review links for this film submitted by our members:

Reviews: VFW (2020)

Here are review links for this film submitted by our members:

  • [New] | Herman Dhaliwal @ Cinema Sanctum
    • Excerpt: What you want from a film like VFW – the kills, the gore, the style, it totally delivers without wasting an ounce of your time, but but one element the film surprisingly nails is the dynamic between the characters, and how they connect with us.
  • Mike McGranaghan @ The Aisle Seat
    • Excerpt: Satisfyingly bloody and wickedly funny.
  • Brent McKnight @ The Last Thing I See
    • Excerpt: Joe Begos’ VFW feels like it crawled out of a grimy, urine-soaked 1980s gutter. And I mean that in the best possible way.
  • Jared Mobarak @ The Film Stage
    • Excerpt: Marry that carnage with performances hinged upon authenticity specifically because of what kind of film this is rather than despite it and you’re in for an entertaining treat.
  • [New] | Dennis Schwartz @ Dennis Schwartz Reviews
    • Excerpt: The gory retro exploitation film is just plain moronic.

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