Reviews: You Were Never Really Here (2018)

Here are review links for this film submitted by our members:

  • [New] | Marco Albanese @ Stanze di Cinema [Italian]
    • Excerpt: È una buona giornata. Per ricominciare. Per rimettersi in cammino. Dopo un incubo nero e allucinato, che ci ha trascinato a fondo. Un grumo di violenza e depravazione, in una New York mai così malata e perduta, che ricorda quella di Taxi Driver.
  • David Bax @ Battleship Pretension
    • Excerpt: This time around, though, Ramsay sadly runs out of runway before ever taking off, coming to rest in a shallow pool of empty cynicism.
  • Francisco Cangiano @ CineXpress [Spanish]
  • [New] | Karl Delossantos @ Smash Cut Reviews
    • Excerpt: You Were Never Really Here is a hypnotic and thrilling crime drama that doesn’t let you go until the credits begin to roll.
  • Herman Dhaliwal @ Cinema Sanctum
    • Excerpt: For the entire runtime, I sank into my seat, completely unnerved, distressed, and unprepared for whatever came next. The power of Ramsay’s craft and Phoenix’s performance, among many other things, leave you completely vulnerable, and at their mercy.
  • James Jay Edwards @ FilmFracture
  • Federico Furzan @ Cinelipsis [Spanish]
  • Roderick Heath @ Film Freedonia
    • Excerpt: Ramsay has so completely coalesced (her) influences, as well as the familiar touchstones of a thriller plot (…) into her own peculiar sensibility that the whole deal emerges not as a compulsive work of suspense and catharsis but as a bad dream from which both the heroes and the viewer are trying to wake.
  • Brent McKnight @ The Last Thing I See
    • Excerpt: A stripped-down portrait of a man wounded in nearly every way imaginable.
  • Simon Miraudo @ Student Edge
  • Jared Mobarak @ JaredMobarak.com
    • Excerpt: An unparalleled exercise in economy, Lynne Ramsay’s You Were Never Really Here cements her status as a cinematic master. This brutalist thriller runs a deliberate yet swift 89-minutes, its central character a man of few words with violence bubbling just beneath a too large heart for the hostile world that’s forced him to retreat within.
  • Darren Mooney @ the m0vie blog
  • C.H. Newell @ Father Son Holy Gore
    • Excerpt: Phoenix’s performance isn’t in the words, rather in the soft looks he flashes to himself in the mirror, the confused anger in his eyes when dealing with violence, the sad memories rolling across his face when he’s alone. The movie examines how someone who’s come from brutal abuse can either sink or swim in their own violence later.