Online Film Critics Society

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Reviews: Steve Jobs (2015)

steve_jobsHere are review links for this film submitted by our members:

  • Marco Albanese @ Stanze di Cinema [Italian]
    • Excerpt: Se non avete mai avuto un ipod o un iphone non vi preoccupate. Non è quello che conta. Steve Jobs ha l’ambizione di andare molto più in profondità, raccontando la storia di un’ossessione.
  • José Arce @ LaButaca.net [Spanish]
    • Excerpt: Atípico biopic estupendamente enfocado, presentado y desarrollado desde el guion de Aaron Sorkin y la genial dirección de orquesta de Danny Boyle. Tres actos trágicos, tres momentos entre bambalinas tan dinámicos como contundentes. Un acierto.
  • Jason Bailey @ Flavorwire
    • Excerpt: Watch Jobs and Woz’s big blow-out fight before the ’98 unveiling, right out in front of a reporter and several employees, which tinges with the electricity of a legitimately awkward public confrontation, while also capturing the specific way two people who actually care about each other will simply let the other have it if they’re pushed hard enough. At its essence, that’s just a scene of two people talking — but it’s more thrilling than any car chase, or superhero battle, or dinosaur rampage.
  • Chris Barsanti @ PopMatters
    • Excerpt: Aaron Sorkin’s aggressively stagey and strangely bullying biopic fails to comprehend either its subject’s cruelty or genius.
  • Nicholas Bell @ Ioncinema
  • Sean Burns @ Spliced Personality
    • Excerpt: I don’t mind that Sorkin’s Christmas Carol structure is brazenly ahistorical so much as I regret he didn’t do anything interesting with it. It’s just the same damn scene three times in a row.
  • Francisco J. Cangiano @ CineXpress [Spanish]
  • Laura Clifford @ Reeling Reviews
    • Excerpt: Screenwriter Aaron Sorkin (“The Social Network”) may have begun with Walter Isaacson’s book, but what he’s created is a kind of technological “A Christmas Carol,” Scrooge’s ghosts visiting during the launches of the Macintosh, the NExT computer and the iMAC
  • David Crow @ Den of Geek
    • Excerpt: If Sorkin’s screenplay for The Social Network turned Mark Zuckerberg into Charles Foster Kane, Steve Jobs morphs its Silicon Valley anti-hero into King Lear. Only this time, the neglected daughter of the passion play is supplanted by three siblings of glass and aluminum.
  • Rob Daniel @ Electric Shadows
    • Excerpt: Perfect example of how biopics should be made
  • Jim Dixon @ Examiner.com
    • Excerpt: The thing is, no matter how much the music swells and no matter how sincere Ms. Winslet’s tears appears to be, sooner or later the audience is going to ask what all the fuss is about. The answer in the context of this movie is that we’re being asked to care about a guy who visionary or not, just isn’t very nice.
  • Mark Dujsik @ Mark Reviews Movies
    • Excerpt: Steve Jobs is effective as an exercise in classical form, highlighted by Sorkin’s biting brand of hyper-aware dialogue.
  • Candice Frederick @ Reel Talk Online
  • John Gilpatrick @ JohnLikesMovies.com
    • Excerpt: Writer Aaron Sorkin and director Danny Boyle paint the life of tech visionary Steve Jobs on a unique canvas that maximizes their film’s urgency and emotional intensity.
  • Panagiotis Pete Gkaris @ Movies Ltd. [Greek]
  • Susan Granger @ www.susangranger.com
    • Excerpt: Kinetic & enigmatic – it’s extraordinary entertainment, eminently suitable for its iconic, yet inscrutable subject.
  • Vadym Grygoriev @ kinoblog.com [Ukrainian]
  • Mark Hobin @ Fast Film Reviews
    • Excerpt: Steve Jobs benefits from a crackerjack screenplay. The lightning fast dialogue, particularly in the first two acts is quite mesmerizing.
  • MaryAnn Johanson @ FlickFilosopher.com
    • Excerpt: You’ve never seen such a compelling, entertaining movie about a genius jerk. As smart and as sleek as a Macbook Pro, and a compulsory bit of modern history.
  • Charlie Juhl @ Citizen Charlie
    • Excerpt: This is pure cinema magic. This is why I go to the movies.
  • Steve Katz @ The Alpha Primitive
    • Excerpt: Sorkin’s protagonists have always taken a sort of Aristotelian view of the world where one’s happiness, worth and moral sense is driven by the desire to perfect one’s “work” or calling in life. He often receives criticism for the manner in which his characters act like producing a SportsCenter-esque highlights show or a cable news program or a new computer is the single most important action in the world, but his characters remain consistently steadfast in that singular brand of Ancient Greek striving for self-worth.
  • Ben Kendrick @ Screen Rant
    • Excerpt: Steve Jobs is a quality portrait of Apple’s co-founder, with a gripping turn from Fassbender – even if the film plays fast and loose with history.
  • Jeremy Kibler @ The Artful Critic
    • Excerpt: Commendably, director Danny Boyle’s “Steve Jobs” reminds more of Charles Dickens’ classic “A Christmas Carol” married with Alejandro González Iñárritu’s “Birdman or (The Unexpected Virtue of Ignorance” than any cradle-to-grave biopic.
  • Benjamin Kramer @ The Voracious Filmgoer
  • Kristin Dreyer Kramer @ NightsAndWeekends.com
  • Joe Lozito @ Big Picture Big Sound
    • Excerpt: An ingenious structure and Aaron Sorkin’s typically sharp dialogue elevate this exploration of the Apple icon beyond the standard biopic.
  • Alan Mattli @ Facing the Bitter Truth [German]
    • Excerpt: There are some stiff moments, and the ending is a disappointment, but Danny Boyle and Aaron Sorkin nevertheless deliver a supremely watchable, brilliantly pared down and condensed take on the phenomenon that was, and is, Steve Jobs.
  • Jason McKiernan @ Next Projection
  • [New – 2/5/16] | Simon Miraudo @ Student Edge
  • Jared Mobarak @ Jared Mobarak Reviews
    • Excerpt: I was literally on the edge of my seat basking in the glory of this man’s hubris, amazed at how right he was despite an attitude making everyone around him hope he wasn’t. That attitude brought us amazing products and while we can sympathize with those who endured his wrath, perhaps their pain was worth it.
  • Pat Mullen @ Cinemablographer
    • Excerpt: Steve Jobs gives the audience a thoroughly objective and ultimately winning portrait of a rotten apple.
  • Stefan Pape @ HeyUGuys
  • Eddie Pasa @ DC Filmdom
    • Excerpt: Steve Jobs makes its mark as one of this generation’s important and great films.
  • João Pinto @ Portal Cinema [Portuguese]
    • Excerpt: Good Drama, Bad Biopic!
  • Jason Pirodsky @ Expats.cz
    • Excerpt: A whirlwind glimpse into the personal and professional life of the Apple founder, competitor, and eventual CEO savoir, Steve Jobs is essentially a three-scene movie but it’s so rat-a-tat compelling that we’re glued to the screen throughout.
  • Jerry Roberts @ Armchair Cinema
    • Excerpt: Danny Boyle’s bio-pic Steve Jobs probably comes as close as anyone is likely to get with a storytelling narrative to who Jobs was personally. If you want a story closer to the bone, watch the documentary Steve Jobs: The Man in the Machine from earlier this year. It intended to break apart Jobs’ cult of personality and find out what made him tick.
  • Cole Smithey @ ColeSmithey.com
    • Excerpt: For a movie that resists the traditional biopic movie formula of career-high-and-low flashbacks (witness Ashton Kutcher’s disastrous “Jobs” — now streaming on Netflix), “Steve Jobs” is a droning tone poem of a character-study.
  • Frank Swietek @ One Guys Opinion
    • Excerpt: Rather than trying to cover everything in Jobs’ life, Sorkin, Boyle and Fassbender have painted an impressionistic portrait rather than a naturalistic one, using their imagination and gift for highly-charged theatricality in a creative fashion Jobs himself might well have appreciated.
  • Andrew Wyatt @ St. Louis Magazine
    • Excerpt: Like the superior The Social Network (also penned by Sorkin), Boyle’s film is not interested in sweeping portraiture or documentary persuasion, but in utilizing real-world figures to dissect notions of talent, ambition, and leadership.
Updated: February 5, 2016 — 7:27 pm
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