Online Film Critics Society

The World's Oldest Organization of Online Film Critics

From Our Members' Desks (Feb. 9, 2016)

OFCS members don’t just write film reviews. Here are several articles you might find interesting.

Best of Lists

List: 20 Underrated & Overlooked 21st Century Horror Movies

Ross Miller @ Thoughts On Film

  • Excerpt: I take a look at some great 21st century horror movies that you may not have seen/heard of.

A Most Violent Year

Diego Salgado @ Miradas de Cine [Spanish]

Sicario

Diego Salgado @ Miradas de Cine [Spanish]

Top 10 Sundance 2016

Nicholas Bell @ Ioncinema

Top Anticipated Sundance 2016

Nicholas Bell @ Ioncinema

Awards Coverage

List: 20 Underrated & Overlooked 21st Century Horror Movies

Ross Miller @ Thoughts On Film

  • Excerpt: I take a look at some great 21st century horror movies that you may not have seen/heard of.

A Most Violent Year

Diego Salgado @ Miradas de Cine [Spanish]

Sicario

Diego Salgado @ Miradas de Cine [Spanish]

Top 10 Sundance 2016

Nicholas Bell @ Ioncinema

Top Anticipated Sundance 2016

Nicholas Bell @ Ioncinema

Interviews

Interruption presents our future stars

Joseph Proimakis @ Popaganda.gr [Greek]

  • Excerpt: Apart from an engulfing cinematic experience, Giorgos Zois’ feature debut also offers a glimps in the country’s next big stars

Jim Whitaker, producer of “The Finest Hours”

Nell Minow @ The Movie Mom

Matt Charman, co-screenwriter of “Bridge of Spies”

Nell Minow @ The Movie Mom

Festivals: General Coverage

The Best and Worst of Sundance 2016, Documentary Edition

Jason Bailey @ Flavorwire

  • Excerpt: 2015 was a banner year for documentaries at the Sundance Film Festival (the slate included Going Clear, Best of Enemies, The Hunting Ground, and Listen to Me Marlon), so it was probably inevitable that this year would feel like a bit of a comedown – and while I wasn’t able to see anywhere near all of them (it’s just not possible!), there weren’t a lot of nonfiction films gathering buzz as knock-your-socks-off great. But those I saw were very good indeed, so here are a few to keep an eye out for in the weeks and months to come.

The Best and Worst of Sundance 2016, Narrative Edition

Jason Bailey @ Flavorwire

  • Excerpt: This year’s Sundance Film Festival seemed to get off to a rocky start; maybe it was programming and maybe it was poor choices, but I came out of the first couple of days wondering if it was just going to be a weird, off year, and nothing I was hearing from my colleagues seemed to indicate otherwise. But then a series of great movies unspooled, and we ended up with an embarrassment of riches.

Urgent Stories: The Africa World Film Festival at the Missouri History Museum

Andrew Wyatt @ St. Louis Magazine

  • Excerpt: The documentary side of African cinema will be the center of attention this weekend when the Missouri History Museum hosts the Ninth Annual Africa World Film Festival (AAWFF), a fitting kick-off for the city’s Black History Month events.

Festivals: Individual Reviews

The Birth of a Nation

Jason Bailey @ Flavorwire

  • Excerpt: The gifted actor, familiar from ‘Beyond the Lights,’ ‘Red Tails,’ and ‘Arbitrage,’ put everything on the line to make this dramatization of the 1831 slave revolt led by Nat Turner; he not only plays Turner, but wrote, directed, and produced the film as well. You can feel his blood pulsing through every frame of Birth of a Nation, a vital, stirring, and powerful film by and about people of color – and which arrives like a hand grenade in the midst of a deafeningly loud discussion about why that’s such a rarity in contemporary Hollywood.

Dustin Jansick @ Way Too Indie

Certain Women

Jason Bailey @ Flavorwire

  • Excerpt: There are no verbose emotional arias or chest-beating screaming matches. It’s a collection of the tiniest moments, which accumulate into a kind of devastation.

The Eagle Huntress

Dustin Jansick @ Way Too Indie

The Intervention

Jason Bailey @ Flavorwire

  • Excerpt: Comedy like this is all about characters, so the opening scenes are a bit on the bumpy side — understandably, as we’re getting to know these people and how they interact. But once these people are established, it’s just pinball; DuVall proves an adroit writer/director, creating durable group dynamics, situating and triangulating these characters off each other.

Joshy

Dustin Jansick @ Way Too Indie

The Land

Jason Bailey @ Flavorwire

Lo and Behold: Reveries of the Connected World

Jason Bailey @ Flavorwire

  • Excerpt: Lo and Behold’ isn’t top-shelf Herzog; it doesn’t have the majesty of ‘Cave of Forgotten Dreams,’ the sorrow of ‘Into the Abyss,’ or the power of ‘Grizzly Man.’ But it’s still Herzog, and that’s certainly worth celebrating.

Love & Friendship

Jason Bailey @ Flavorwire

  • Excerpt: Above all (and surely to the relief of those prone to resist costume drama) it’s just a very playful picture, with Stillman throwing in clever little touches like silent movie-style character intro cards and clever on-screen text to illustrate a letter-reading scene. And it’s a spry movie to boot, running barely over 90 minutes, as Stillman adopts a good, fast, almost proto-screwball style that retains (and even adds to) the various plot machinations and abundance of characters without getting bogged down in them.

Mapplethorpe: Look at the Pictures

Jason Bailey @ Flavorwire

  • Excerpt: If there’s a complaint to be made, it’s that the squareness of the format doesn’t allow much of a deep dive into what made (and makes) Mapplethorpe so interesting; they’re so busy covering the biographical bases that there’s precious little time to get analytical. But taking its confines into account, there’s much to recommend in ‘Mapplethorpe: Look at the Pictures.’

Operation Avalanche

Dustin Jansick @ Way Too Indie

White Girl

Dustin Jansick @ Way Too Indie

Wiener-Dog

Jason Bailey @ Flavorwire

  • Excerpt: And that’s the problem with Solondz these days, in a nutshell; he’s just spinning his wheels, continuing to tell the same stories in the same way, and expecting them to elicit the same response. He’s certainly not the first filmmaker to get stuck in a rut, or, if you’d like to put it more charitably, to stick with a particular style; the catch is that his absurd point-of-view was so specific to its late-‘90s moment that it now seems like a relic, a filmmaker trying his hardest to provoke us with his casual mentions of rape and AIDS, but just coming off desperate.

Essays

2015, a remake year

Diego Salgado @ Diagonal [Spanish]

Destroy All Monsters: Gay Or Straight, Finn/Poe Matters

Matt Brown @ TwitchFilm

Reviews of Short Films

Day One

Jennie Kermode @ Eye For Film

The Present

Paulo Peralta @ CinEuphoria [Portuguese]

  • Excerpt: German Short Animated Film Review

Sanjay’s Super Team

Jennie Kermode @ Eye For Film

We Can’t Live Without Cosmos

Jennie Kermode @ Eye For Film

Xico+Xana

Paulo Peralta @ CinEuphoria [Portuguese]

  • Excerpt: Portuguese-Austrian Short Film Review

Other Articles

China Doll

Robert Cashill @ Popdose.com

  • Excerpt: Al Pacino in David Mamet’s new play.

Film Love Songs, Snow White and Book Giveaway

Betty Jo Tucker @ Movie Addict Headquarters

  • Excerpt: During this fun podcast, A.J. Hakari raves about new Snow White Blu-ray, and Betty Jo Tucker plays film love songs. Giveaway plans for a Kindle E-book romance are also explained.

The Morning After: Feb. 1, 2016

Wesley Lovell @ Cinema Sight

  • Excerpt: Short review of “Kung Fu Panda 3”
Updated: February 9, 2016 — 11:00 am

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