Reviews: Irresistible (2020)

Here are review links for this film submitted by our members:

  • Laura Clifford @ Reeling Reviews
    • Excerpt: Mixing the high stakes, small town politics of “Welcome to Mooseport” with the farmland morals (and sucker punch twist) of …“Promised Land”…“Irresistible” is just too been-there-done-that to have much relevance.
  • [New] | Rob DiCristino @ F This Movie
  • [New] | James Jay Edwards @ The Big Smoke America
  • Charlie Juhl @ Citizen Charlie
    • Excerpt: Jon Stewart wraps a critique of America’s divisive and money-saturated electoral system inside a political comedy…but he forgot the comedy.
  • [New] | Mike McGranaghan @
    • Excerpt: What the film says could not be more timely. In that sense, this is the political comedy we need right now.
  • [New] | Eddie Pasa @ DC Filmdom
    • Excerpt: Irresistible is a moderate call to arms amid a growing chasm of right vs. left. There’s an honest appeal for humanity to which writer/director Jon Stewart wishes to aspire.

Classics & More on DVD (Jun. 30, 2020)

Here are our latest reviews of films on DVD.

Pre-2018 Film Reviews

Gone with the Wind

Emanuel Levy @ EmanuelLevy.com (1939)

  • Excerpt: Gone With the Wind swept the 1939 Oscars, becoming one of the most popular movies ever made. Is the movie racist? kitsch? influential? enjoyable?

Gone with the Wind

Josh Taylor @ www.forgetfulfilmcritic.com (1939)

  • Excerpt: The actual production value of the film is its only saving grace. Gone with the Wind is unquestionably a work of art made with considerable talent and quality, but the film is vile and insidious in how it depicts race, the Civil War, and slavery in the Old South.

How Green Was My Valley

Emanuel Levy @ EmanuelLevy.com (1941)

  • Excerpt: Politics, both within and without determined why John Ford’s How Green Was My Valley won the 1941 Best Picture Oscar and why Orson Welles’ Citizen Kane was snubbed

Pitch Perfect 2

Wesley Lovell @ Cinema Sight (2015)

Rebecca

Emanuel Levy @ EmanuelLevy.com (1940)

  • Excerpt: Rebecca, the Best Picture Oscar of 1940 is the only Hitchcock movie to win the top award and only one of few thrillers to achieve that (the genre not prestigious enough among Academy voters)

From Our Members’ Desks (Jun. 29, 2020)

OFCS members don’t just write film reviews. Here are several articles you might find interesting.

Best of Lists

5 Favorites Redux #33: Favorite Films by Black Directors

Wesley Lovell @ Cinema Sight

Interviews

A Little Bit of Buffer Room for Surprise: Bryce Dallas Howard on “Dads”

Nell Minow @ rogerebert.com

  • Excerpt: So, leave a little bit of buffer room for surprise, for humanity, for unexpected things to come out. I think that that’s the magic of what is possible with filmmaking.

Miss Juneteenth

Candice Frederick @ New York Times

Think Like a Dog Writer/Director Gil Junger on his Family Friendly Canine Comedy

Nell Minow @ The Credits

  • Excerpt: Gil Junger talked about the pleasures of ignoring the show business adage about never working with children or dogs and how the film is a love letter inspired by his own experience of re-connection to his family.

Training the Pups in Think Like a Dog

Nell Minow @ The Credits

  • Excerpt: It’s really important to me that the dog isn’t just staring at its’ trainer the whole time. I told Gabriel he would have to learn to become a trainer as well.

Festivals: General Coverage

Continue reading From Our Members’ Desks (Jun. 29, 2020)

This Week at the Movies (Jun. 26, 2020)

Here are some reviews of films coming out at the theater this week as well as others that may be in theaters or newly on home video.

Opening: Jun. 26, 2020

Wide (United States)

None

Limited (United States)

Beats

Laura Clifford @ Reeling Reviews

  • Excerpt: Brian Welsh’s timely film celebrates civil disobedience through a coming-of-age lens at a time when authoritarianism is on the rise and the youngest generation is at the forefront of the human rights battle… The moving, central heartbeat of “Beats” is how Welsh lets us see Spanner through Johnno’s eyes.

Brent McKnight @ The Last Thing I See

  • Excerpt: Beats captures the highs and lows, the simultaneous hope and desolation, and, most of all, the wild, anarchic freedom of youth and having no idea what you’re doing, but plowing full speed ahead, consequences be damned.

Irresistible

Laura Clifford @ Reeling Reviews

  • Excerpt: Mixing the high stakes, small town politics of “Welcome to Mooseport” with the farmland morals (and sucker punch twist) of …“Promised Land”…“Irresistible” is just too been-there-done-that to have much relevance.

Charlie Juhl @ Citizen Charlie

  • Excerpt: Jon Stewart wraps a critique of America’s divisive and money-saturated electoral system inside a political comedy…but he forgot the comedy.

2020 Films In Theaters Now In Select Areas

Continue reading This Week at the Movies (Jun. 26, 2020)

Reviews: Endings, Beginnings (2020)

Here are review links for this film submitted by our members:

  • [New] | Rick Aragon @ Rick’s Texan Reviews
  • Herman Dhaliwal @ Cinema Sanctum
    • Excerpt: The filmmaking is elegant and gorgeous, but it still can’t help but feel stock and standard. However, Shailene Woodley still manages to shine through.
  • MaryAnn Johanson @ FlickFilosopher.com
    • Excerpt: Love this cast, but, my god, I hate these characters. I hate this miserable take on romance, which mistakes wallowing in self-pity for introspection, and people being awful for philosophical depth.
  • Jared Mobarak @ The Film Stage
    • Excerpt: I have to imagine that a second viewing is where Endings, Beginnings truly shines. I’m just not sure I care enough to confirm it.
  • Beverly Questad @ It’s Just Movies
    • Excerpt: Some sorry millennials will gravitate to this story, but Daphne’s life was too much a thoughtless, self-centered, woe-is-me story of an unemployed, unrealized woman for a mature audience to appreciate.

Reviews: End of Sentence (2020)

Here are review links for this film submitted by our members:

Reviews: And Then We Danced (2020)

Here are review links for this film submitted by our members:

  • [New] | Rick Aragon @ Rick’s Texan Reviews
  • Laura Clifford @ Reeling Reviews
    • Excerpt: In one amazing sequence, the camera follows Merab through room after room of David’s wedding reception toward his heartbreak before doubling back against the irony of dancing guests… His final, rebellious dance for Aleko and Beso is a complete show stopper.
  • Jared Mobarak @ The Film Stage
    • Excerpt: And Then We Danced is a love story, but it’s not merely a sexual awakening. We’re watching as Merab is exposed to a world he’s been conditioned to ignore.
  • Jonathan Richards @ www.santafenewmexican.com
    • Excerpt: Akin doesn’t discover many original wrinkles in this coming out story, but it’s the powerful cultural context, and some terrific dancing and acting by Gelbakhiani, that earn this movie its dancing shoes.
  • Rene Sanchez @ Cine Sin Fronteras [Spanish]
    • Excerpt: And Then We Danced es una vibrante, desafiante y enternecedora semblanza sobre el primer amor, aquel que deja una huella indeleble en nuestros corazones para siempre. Un relato necesario que muestra que el amor es amor, sin etiquetas ni prejuicios.

Reviews: 7500 (2020)

Here are review links for this film submitted by our members:

  • Andrea Chase @ KillerMovieReviews.com
    • Excerpt: By removing any hint of sensationalism from the events, filmmaker Patrick Vollrath focuses on the moment-to-moment uncertainty of people ripped in an instant from the security of their familiar routines, and then forced to face both impossible choices as well as their own mortality.
  • Herman Dhaliwal @ Cinema Sanctum
    • Excerpt: Joseph Gordon-Levitt’s performance and the filmmakers’ effective tension building makes for an engaging watch, even if there is little going on under the surface.
  • Rob DiCristino @ F This Movie
  • [New] | Mark Hobin @ Fast Film Reviews
    • Excerpt: Joseph Gordon-Levitt gives another solid performance in this generic airborne thriller.
  • MaryAnn Johanson @ FlickFilosopher.com
    • Excerpt: Mundanity builds to almost unbearable tension, but this isn’t an action movie. It’s a drama grounded in emotional realism thanks to the Joseph Gordon-Levitt’s intense empathy and vulnerable humanity.
  • Jared Mobarak @ JaredMobarak.com
    • Excerpt: At best it reveals the film to be tone-deaf in its bid to humanize victims of a complex situation by placing them in the exact scenario westerners use to dehumanize them.
  • Eddie Pasa @ Gunaxin

Reviews: The King (2019)

Here are review links for this film submitted by our members:

Classics & More on DVD (Jun. 23, 2020)

Here are our latest reviews of films on DVD.

Pre-2018 Film Reviews

An American in Paris

James Wegg @ JWR (1951)

  • Excerpt: They could have danced all night

Big Man Japan

Gregory J. Smalley @ 366 Weird Movies (2007)

  • Excerpt: If you love cinematic strangeness, Japanese-style, then you’ll be hooked from the moment “the Strangling Monster” flips his head to restore the combover that’s slipped out of place as he tosses the top half of a skyscraper into a nearby river.

The Great Ziegfeld

Emanuel Levy @ emanuellevy.com (1936)

  • Excerpt: Lavishly produced, but dramatically dull, The Great Ziegfeld was the second musical to win the Best Picture Oscar, in 1936.

It Happened One Night

Emanuel Levy @ emanuellevy.com (1934)

  • Excerpt: It Happened One Night. the 1934 Best Picture Oscar winner, was the first film to get awards in all five top categories, including Best Actor and Best Actress for Clark Gable and Claudette Colbert

The Life of Emile Zola

Emanuel Levy @ emanuellevy.com (1937)

  • Excerpt: Directed by William Dieterle, the crusading drama The Life of Emile Zola won the 1937 Best Picture Oscar.

Mutiny on the Bounty

Emanuel Levy @ emanuellevy.com (1935)

  • Excerpt: The first of three big screen versions of The Mutiny on the Bounty, th 1935 Best Picture Oscar, is still the most compelling, largely due to the superb acting of Charles Laughton and Clark Gable

Pitch Perfect

Wesley Lovell @ Cinema Sight (2012)

You Can’t Take It With You (1938)

Emanuel Levy @ emanuellevy.com (1938)

  • Excerpt: Frank Capra became the most acclaimed filmmaker of the Depression era, when You Can’t Take It With You won the 1938 Best Picture Oscar and he received his third Best Director Oscar

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