Reviews: Bad Boys for Life (2020)

Here are review links for this film submitted by our members:

  • Laura Clifford @ Reeling Reviews
    • Excerpt: …a welcome January surprise, Lowrey and Burnett a lot more fun to hang with than Hobbs and Shaw.
  • [New] | Herman Dhaliwal @ Cinema Sanctum
    • Excerpt: Fans of the series will probably be very happy with Bad Boys For Life, and action junkies can be rest assured that the film delivers on the action, which sticks to the gritty practicality of the previous films.
  • [New] | Sarah Gopaul @ Digital Journal
    • Excerpt: While it’s fun seeing old faces still doing the same shtick, the first half of this movie may have viewers wondering if everyone involved made a mistake signing onto this project. But the second half is fully redeeming and worth the wait.
  • Charlie Juhl @ Citizen Charlie
    • Excerpt: If you’ve seen the first two, you’ve already seen 75% of the new installment
  • [New] | Brent McKnight @ Giant Freakin’ Robot
    • Excerpt: It doesn’t blow the doors off the genre, or stray far from the formula, but for viewers nostalgic for an earlier kind of R-rated action movie, and who have missed Will Smith and Martin Lawrence hollering back and forth at each other while driving 100 miles per hour and dodging bullets, it evokes pleasant enough sensations.
  • Simon Miraudo @ Student Edge
    • Excerpt: Aw, hell yeah.
  • [New] | Jared Mobarak @ JaredMobarak.com
    • Excerpt: We finally delve into who these guys are beyond machismo. Is it enough to reinvigorate the entire franchise? Probably not. But it was enough to make this chapter worthwhile.
  • [New] | Eddie Pasa @ Gunaxin
    • Excerpt: The latest entry in the Bad Boys franchise moves into a more easygoing space, distancing itself from what Roger Ebert once called “The Swinging Dick” genre.

Classics & More on DVD (Jan. 14, 2020)

Here are our latest reviews of films on DVD.

Pre-2018 Film Reviews

Aladdin

M Enois Duarte @ High-Def Digest.com (1992)

  • Excerpt: Walt Disney’s Aladdin (1992) remains one of the best from the studio’s Renaissance era and largely thanks to Robin Willaims’s marvelously memorable performance.

Gremlins

M Enois Duarte @ High-Def Digest.com (1984)

  • Excerpt: Joe Dante’s Gremlins is a horror-comedy of pure awesomeness that continues to deliver the scares and laughs with festive cheer.

Hellboy

M Enois Duarte @ High-Def Digest.com (2004)

  • Excerpt: With an indelibly memorable performance by Ron Perlman as the titular character, Guillermo del Toro’s Hellboy continues to entertain fifteen years later with plenty of laughs, whimsically inventive action and freakishly imaginative visuals.

Red Heat

M Enois Duarte @ High-Def Digest.com (1988)

  • Excerpt: Although nothing particularly special about Walter Hill’s buddy-cop Red Heat, the story is an entertaining enough mix of the conventional formula with topical issues, featuring an amusing performance by Arnold Schwarzenegger.

Suspiria

M Enois Duarte @ High-Def Digest.com (1977)

  • Excerpt: Dario Argento’s psychedelic nightmare Suspiria is a highly-stylized experiment in terror, and it remains a cult horror masterpiece.

Universal Soldier

M Enois Duarte @ High-Def Digest.com (1992)

  • Excerpt: Jean-Claude Van Damme and Dolph Lundgren duke it out in Roland Emmerich’s Universal Soldier as genetically-enhanced super-soldiers, making for decently fun escapism.

Zombieland

M Enois Duarte @ High-Def Digest.com (2009)

  • Excerpt: Ruben Fleischer’s Zombieland celebrates its 10th Anniversary with the same hilariously fun, post-apocalyptic thrills and genre-bending smarts.

From Our Members’ Desks (Jan. 13, 2020)

OFCS members don’t just write film reviews. Here are several articles you might find interesting.

Best of Lists

10 reasons why Deadwood is one of the greatest TV shows of the modern era

Blake Howard @

5 Favorites Redux #8: Best of the Decade, Part 1

Wesley Lovell @ Cinema Sight

All Spider-Man movies, ranked from worst to best

Blake Howard @

Festivals: General Coverage

Festival Conversations | A Tale of Two Goodes

Blake Howard @ AACTA

The Inaugural AACTA Shorts + Web Fest Presented by Mini

Blake Howard @ AACTA

Our 8 Most Anticipated Movies At Sundance 2020

Kyle Anderson @ Nerdist

Awards Coverage

2019 Oscar Nominations Predictions: Final

Wesley Lovell @ Cinema Sight

The Friday Face-Off Round One #21

Wesley Lovell @ Cinema Sight

Oscar Morning: The Article

Wesley Lovell @ Cinema Sight

Oscar Preview: Precursor Winners & Losers, Week 7

Wesley Lovell @ Cinema Sight

Essays

Finding Dory,’ Restoring Relationships and Finding a Way to View Mental Illness

Blake Howard @

Is everything connected in the Tarantino universe?

Blake Howard @

Other Types of Articles

7 reasons why the No Time to Die trailer has got us crazy excited

Blake Howard @ Flicks.com.au

Streaming Bloody Murder: Horror VOD Postmortem for December 2019

Andrew Wyatt @ The Lens

Oscar in Box Office History (Week 1, 2020)

Wesley Lovell @ Cinema Sight

Poll: Best of Jan. 2019, Wide

Wesley Lovell @ Cinema Sight

Poll: Now That You’ve Seen “The Grudge”

Wesley Lovell @ Cinema Sight

Poll: Remaking Best Supporting Actress, 1998

Wesley Lovell @ Cinema Sight

Poll: What Are You Watching? (Jan. 10-12, 2020)

Wesley Lovell @ Cinema Sight

Preview: A Quiet Place: Part II, updated

Wesley Lovell @ Cinema Sight

Preview: Burden

Wesley Lovell @ Cinema Sight

Preview: Downhill

Wesley Lovell @ Cinema Sight

Preview: Never Rarely Sometimes Always

Wesley Lovell @ Cinema Sight

Preview: Promising Young Woman

Wesley Lovell @ Cinema Sight

Preview: The Assistant

Wesley Lovell @ Cinema Sight

Preview: The Corrupted

Wesley Lovell @ Cinema Sight

Preview: The Gentlemen, updated

Wesley Lovell @ Cinema Sight

Preview: The Murder of Nicole Brown Simpson

Wesley Lovell @ Cinema Sight

Preview: The Sonata

Wesley Lovell @ Cinema Sight

Preview: The SpongeBob Movie: Sponge on the Run

Wesley Lovell @ Cinema Sight

Preview: The Whistlers

Wesley Lovell @ Cinema Sight

This Day in Oscar History: January 3

Wesley Lovell @ Cinema Sight

This Day in Oscar History: January 4

Wesley Lovell @ Cinema Sight

This Day in Oscar History: January 5

Wesley Lovell @ Cinema Sight

This Day in Oscar History: January 6

Wesley Lovell @ Cinema Sight

This Day in Oscar History: January 7

Wesley Lovell @ Cinema Sight

This Day in Oscar History: January 8

Wesley Lovell @ Cinema Sight

This Day in Oscar History: January 9

Wesley Lovell @ Cinema Sight

This Week at the Movies (Jan. 10, 2020)

Here are some reviews of films coming out at the theater this week as well as others that may be in theaters or newly on home video.

Opening: Jan. 10, 2020

Wide (United States)

Underwater

For member reviews of this film, follow this link

Expanding (United States)

1917

For member reviews of this film, follow this link

Just Mercy

For member reviews of this film, follow this link

Limited (United States)

Inherit the Viper

Herman Dhaliwal @ Cinema Sanctum

  • Excerpt: While the film might not say a whole lot about the opioid crisis, the performances and strong direction keeps the story engaging and the suspense exciting.

Invisible Life

Laura Clifford @ Reeling Reviews

  • Excerpt: The two actresses are both engaging, although the vivacious Stockler has the advantage of a more fully developed character.

Les Misérables

Chris Barsanti @ Slant

  • Excerpt: The film serves as both caustic update to Victor Hugo’s monolithic novel and cautionary tale about the future.

Les Misérables

Laura Clifford @ Reeling Reviews

  • Excerpt: Ly had been filming on his own streets since the age of fifteen, supported by the Kourtrajmé collective, so it is notable that while his feature film debut echoes Hugo’s classic for modern times, it is also a fine example of the French policier procedural.

Three Christs

Laura Clifford @ Reeling Reviews

  • Excerpt: Despite a strong cast, the film is narratively disheveled, introducing subplots only to drop them and coming to no strong conclusions about the success of Stone’s experiment.

2020 Films In Theaters Now In Select Areas

Continue reading This Week at the Movies (Jan. 10, 2020)

Reviews: Underwater (2020)

Here are review links for this film submitted by our members:

  • Herman Dhaliwal @ Cinema Sanctum
    • Excerpt: Underwater is by all accounts a junky b-movie with a studio gloss, but it’s an effective and tense junky b-movie with a studio gloss.
  • [New] | Sarah Gopaul @ Digital Journal
    • Excerpt: The special effects whip audiences into the film in the opening minutes and keep them there for the remainder of the picture.
  • Charlie Juhl @ Citizen Charlie
    • Excerpt: Underwater stands on the shoulders of claustrophobic monster movie giants, liberally helping itself to ideas and themes, but it fails to give back or push the genre anywhere fresh – its major sin being how rote and episodic it all plays out.
  • Mike McGranaghan @
    • Excerpt: Underwater is one of those middling films that’s as hard to hate as it is hard to love.
  • Brent McKnight @ The Last Thing I See
    • Excerpt: Rad B-movie schlock, this feels like an artifact from the late-1980s and delivers exactly what I hoped it would.
  • Eddie Pasa @ Gunaxin

Reviews: Just Mercy (2019)

Here are review links for this film submitted by our members:

  • Laura Clifford @ Reeling Reviews
    • Excerpt: Cretton delivers his most disappointing work to date, a mediocre, cliché ridden, speechifying tale of the fight to free an innocent black man railroaded by racist Southerners.
  • [New] | Mark Hobin @ Fast Film Reviews
    • Excerpt: I’ve seen some pretty simplistic dramas in my day but this screenplay underestimates the moral decency of its audience by fashioning a narrative that’s so obvious it’s condescending.
  • [New] | MaryAnn Johanson @ FlickFilosopher.com
    • Excerpt: This true origin story of a literal social-justice warrior is earnest, passionate… and exhausting. We need to keep telling these stories, yet each is but another tiny drop of water in a rough ocean.
  • [New] | Mike McGranaghan @
    • Excerpt: Just Mercy works beautifully as both an examination of a vital issue and as a gripping legal story.
  • Jared Mobarak @ JaredMobarak.com
    • Excerpt: Moments of hardship and tragedy do land and [the actors are up to exposing] their characters’ pain, but too often these affecting displays arrive with paint-by-number clarity.
  • Betty Jo Tucker @ ReelTalk Movie Reviews
    • Excerpt: This compelling movie boasts a couple of suspenseful courtroom scenes, but most of the drama relates to hard work and a dedication to making sure equal justice prevails regardless of race or class.

Reviews: 6 Underground (2019)

Here are review links for this film submitted by our members:

Reviews: Clemency (2019)

Here are review links for this film submitted by our members:

  • Frederic & Mary Ann Brussat @ Spirituality & Practice
    • Excerpt: An emotionally rich drama that explores the moral and ethical impact of the death penalty on those required to enforce it.
  • [New] | Laura Clifford @ Reeling Reviews
    • Excerpt: In a chilling scene, [Woodward] recites execution day steps to Anthony like an automaton, her voice rising like a customer service rep making a sales pitch whenever he is allowed to choose an option.
  • Herman Dhaliwal @ Cinema Sanctum
    • Excerpt: Anchored by a brilliant Alfre Woodard performance, Clemency is a hard hitting character study that touches on complex themes in an effective way.
  • Candice Frederick @ The Wrap
  • Jared Mobarak @ JaredMobarak.com
    • Excerpt: This isn’t a film for everyone because many can’t have sympathy for people who choose to work [on] death row. [But that] shouldn’t negate the human story Chukwu created.
  • [New] | Bev Questad @ It’s Just Movies
    • Excerpt: A strong, seasoned, ensemble cast inhabit the story by a deeply brilliant writer, Chinonye Chukwu, a Nigerian-born, Alaskan-raised screenwriter, producer, and director.

From Our Members’ Desks (Jan. 7, 2020)

OFCS members don’t just write film reviews. Here are several articles you might find interesting.

Best of Lists

13 of the Most Underrated Music Documentaries of the Decade

Mike McGranaghan @ Ranker

The 20 Best 3D Movies of the Decade

Aaron Neuwirth @ We Live Entertainment

  • Excerpt: Here’s a look at 20 films that stood out when it came to presenting a meaningful use of 3D to a movie’s presentation (with an emphasis on technique over overall film quality), beyond just a surcharge at the box office counter.

The 20 Best Black Films of the Last Decade

Candice Frederick @ Essence

The 50 Most-Anticipated Movies of 2020

Brent McKnight @ The Last Thing I See

  • Excerpt: We may not get flying cars in 2020, but there are a crap ton of movies to look forward to.

Aaron Neuwirth’s 19 Favorite Movie Scenes of 2019

Aaron Neuwirth @ We Live Entertainment

  • Excerpt: Going from knife fights to moon chases to Sondheim, Aaron Neuwirth lists his favorite movie moments from 2019.

Aaron’s Outstanding Top Ten Films of 2019

Aaron Neuwirth @ Why So Blu?

  • Excerpt: Some films were instant favorites, others stuck with me and only managed to grow on me over time. All of that in mind, the following is the list of films that resonated with me most.

Best Films of 2019

Scott Phillips @ www.wrbl.com

The Best Films of 2019

Andrew Wyatt @ The Lens

Brent’s Top Ten Movies of 2019

Brent McKnight @ The Last Thing I See

My Top 10 Movies for 2019

Mark Hobin @ Fast Film Reviews

  • Excerpt: Here are 10 examples of when I left the theater in an emotional state – be it shock, joy, sadness or elation.

My Top Ten Films of 2019

Betty Jo Tucker @ ReelTalk Movie Reviews

Notable documentaries of 2019

Sarah Boslaugh @ theartsstl.com

Notable Feature Films of 2019

Sarah Boslaugh @ theartsstl.com

Notable Feature Films of the Decade

Sarah Boslaugh @ theartsstl.com

  • Excerpt: It’s hard enough to pick ten films out of the many thousands released in the years 2010-2019, and I frankly can’t imagine ranking them as well. So here’s a list of ten notable feature films from the last decade, in alphabetical order, along with a description of why each deserves to be on this list.

The Year in Film–Mysteries of 2019 Edition

Sarah Boslaugh @ theartsstl.com

  • Excerpt: Who thought a live remake of Aladdin was needed? Bonus question: Who ever told Will Smith that he could sing?

Interviews

Continue reading From Our Members’ Desks (Jan. 7, 2020)

OFCS Presents: 23rd Annual Awards for 2019

23RD ONLINE FILM CRITICS SOCIETY AWARDS WINNERS ANNOUNCED

“Parasite” is the film of the year according to the OFCS

January 6, 2020 — Taking home six awards, including Best Picture of the Year, “Parasite” was the clear favorite of the Online Film Critics Society. “Us” and “1917” were the only other films to earn multiple awards.

In their twenty-third year, the Online Film Critics Society (OFCS) continues to recognize the most superlative achievements of the year with no higher honor being presented by a body of film critics whose work appears predominantly online. This marks the second consecutive year that a non-English language film has taken their top prize.

Confirming the overall quality of Bong Joon-ho’s work on “Parasite,” the Korean production also won awards for Best Director, Best Original Screenplay, Best Editing, a special award for its production design, and Best Film Not in the English Language. Bong was co-writer of the screenplay (with Jin Won Han) based on his own idea.

Other feature awards went to Josh Cooley’s “Toy Story 4” for Best Animated Feature and Todd Douglas Miller’s “Apollo 11” for Best Documentary. Director Olivia Wilde won Best Debut Feature with “Booksmart”.

Steven Zaillian won Best Adapted Screenplay for his screenplay for “The Irishman”. This was Zaillian’s second nomination from the OFCS. The previous citation was in 2012 for “Moneyball.” This is his first win.

Seven years after her OFCS victory for “12 Years a Slave,” Lupita Nyong’o won a second award from the OFCS, this time in the lead actress category for her dual role in “Us.” Adam Driver’s third OFCS Awards nomination in four years yielded his first award for Best Lead Actor for his performance in “Marriage Story.” The supporting awards went to Brad Pitt on his second nomination for “Once Upon a Time… in Hollywood” and Jennifer Lopez in “Hustlers,” her first nomination.

“Us” was also the winner of the Best Original Score award while fellow Best Picture nominee “1917” was given the award for Best Cinematography. In addition to these three creative categories and the award to “Parasite” for its production design, five special achievement awards were given for technical achievements.

“John Wick: Chapter 3 – Parabellum” was honored for its stunt coordination, “Ad Astra” for its visual effects, “1917” for its production design, and “Knives Out” for its acting ensemble.

Each year, the OFCS also asks its members to nominate people and organizations for special recognition. These special achievement awards are given to achievements that aren’t directly related to filmmaking or even to the film industry itself. This year, the OFCS has chosen to honor the Agência Nacional de Cinema (the National Cinema Agency of Brazil) for their work supporting art against attacks from their fascist government.

The OFCS also recognizes five individuals each year who have given tremendously to the art of cinema over lengthy careers, representing various aspects of the filmmaking process including this year’s honorees: actors Julie Andrews and Olivia de Havilland, producer Roger Corman, director Martin Scorsese, and multi-hyphenate John Waters.

The OFCS, which represents 284 film critics from around the world, recognizes the global nature of film and encourages international producers to screen their films for U.S. audiences. To that end, the OFCS recognizes ten films each year that have not yet been released in the United States. These films represent a broadly diverse set of nations from Brazil to Russia to Japan.

And Then We Danced (A European co-production)
Bacurau (Brazil)
Bait (United Kingdom)
Beanpole (Russia)
A Good Woman Is Hard To Find (United Kingdom)
A Rainy Day in New York (USA)
The Truth (France-Japan)
Vitalina Varela (Portugal)
The Whistlers (A European co-production)
Zombi Child (France)

In addition to films that haven’t seen release in the United States, they also want to recognize films that are released on digital platforms, but which are not afforded theatrical distribution. This list includes narrative features and documentaries alike.

Between Two Ferns: The Movie
The Body Remembers When the World Broke Open
El Camino: A Breaking Bad Movie
Homecoming: A Film by Beyoncé
Horror Noire: A History of Black Horror
Little Monsters
One Cut of the Dead
The Perfection
See You Yesterday
The Wind

Based on the votes of our members, the following are the year’s top ten films based on their ranked voting during the awards process.
1. Parasite
2. The Irishman
3. Once Upon a Time… in Hollywood
4. Marriage Story
5. Knives Out
6. Portrait of a Lady on Fire
7. Us
8. Uncut Gems
9. 1917
10. Jojo Rabbit

Full List of Nominations and Winners Here

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About the Online Film Critics Society
Established in 1997, the Online Film Critics Society continues to support and champion the best of global online film criticism. With an international membership, work is published in over 15 languages and covers cinema from around the world. More information can be found at www.ofcs.org.

The World's Oldest Organization of Online Film Critics