Classics & More on DVD (Aug. 3, 2015)

Here are our latest reviews of films on DVD.

Reviews of Classic Films

Blu is the New “Black”

Robert Cashill @ Popdose

  • Excerpt: Blu-ray reviews of Criterion titles including The Black Stallion.

A Brighter Summer Day

Marilyn Ferdinand @ Ferdy on Films

  • Excerpt: Edward Yang’s first masterpiece differs from the similarly themed West Side Story is in its broad, intricate consideration of entire families of mainland Chinese uprooted by the ascendency of Mao Tse-tung and its examination of the transition from one set of cultural values—respect for authority and one’s elders—to another—Western individualism, emancipated youth, and possession-oriented consumerism.

Cesar and Rosalie

Nicholas Bell @ Ioncinema

The Fabulous Baker Boys

Nicholas Bell @ Ioncinema

The Gay Divorcee

Kristen Lopez @ Journeys in Classic Film

Max and the Junkmen

Nicholas Bell @ Ioncinema

My Reputation

Kristen Lopez @ Journeys in Classic Film

Ned Kelly

Nicholas Bell @ Ioncinema

Nelly and Monsieur Arnaud

Nicholas Bell @ Ioncinema

Platoon

Rick Aragon @ Rick’s Cafe Texan

  • Excerpt: Platoon is in the end I think not about Vietnam. It is about morality: in war and within ourselves.

Shall We Dance (1937)

Kristen Lopez @ Journeys in Classic Film

The Sting

Rick Aragon @ Rick’s Cafe Texan

  • Excerpt: The Sting is a delight from beginning to end.

Swing Time

Kristen Lopez @ Journeys in Classic Film

Wings

Roderick Heath @ Ferdy on Films

  • Excerpt: Looked at as a monument to the craft and dynamism of Hollywood filmmaking at the cusp of that first great, wrenching change in the industry, the transition to sound, Wings is indeed a stirring, even staggering relic.

Recent Home Video Releases

He Ran All the Way

Peter Nellhaus @ Coffee, Coffee and more Coffee

  • Excerpt: Blacklisted by the studios while being investigated by the House of Un-American Activities Committee, it was fitting that John Garfield was able to make one last film with United Artists, a company that for the most part was home for filmmakers with liberal leanings.

Ida

João Pinto @ Portal Cinema [Portuguese]

Storm Fear

Peter Nellhaus @ Coffee, Coffee and more Coffee

  • Excerpt: Not a exactly a classic, but Storm Fear is worth seeing for some of its counter-intuitive casting.

Other Reviews from 2012 and earlier

Bad Ronald

James Jay Edwards @ FilmFracture

  • Excerpt: Cinema Fearité Presents ‘Bad Ronald’ – As Scary As A Broadcast Television Movie In The Seventies Could Be

Criminal Court

Stacia Kissick Jones @ She Blogged By Night

I, Madman

Nicholas Bell @ Ioncinema

Innerspace

James Plath @ Family Home Theater

  • Excerpt: Innerspace is one of the better, older comedy-adventures and a great candidate for family movie night. Unlike Fantastic Voyage, this one seems to get better with age.

The Interview

Rick Aragon @ Rick’s Cafe Texan

  • Excerpt: Separate from the scandal and misery the film caused Sony in terms of leaked e-mails and hacking from a terrorist regime so paranoid and devoid of humor, The Interview as a film is unfunny, insulting to the audience, crass, immature, and just terrible.In other words, it’s a Seth Rogen production.

Lady in the Dark (1944)

Dennis Schwartz @ Dennis Schwartz Movie Reviews

Showgirls

Jason Bailey @ Flavorwire

  • Excerpt: When you get down to it, ‘Showgirls’’ problem is a simple one: everyone in it is just vile. I’m not one of those dopes who insists you can’t make a movie without “sympathetic characters,” but I do require compelling ones. The thin, terrible people of ‘Showgirls’ are equally loathsome; you don’t have a rooting interest in Nomi or her “dream,” and as a result, ‘Showgirls’ is 131 minutes of watching trashy, vapid people being terrible to each other.

Society

Gregory J. Smalley @ 366 Weird Movies

  • Excerpt: Society”s eccentricities are part of what makes it loveable. A movie whose showstopping moment is a man with a face on his butt should have a few warts—the hairier the better.

The Trip

Gregory J. Smalley @ 366 Weird Movies

  • Excerpt: It’s Roger Corman’s most experimental film—and one of his best.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.